Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

The Prius rebound effect vs. hybrid fees

Expand Messages
  • docaaron1
    This is sometimes called the Prius fallacy because of how the statistics are interpreted. It goes something like this, since the Prius gets much better gas
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 2 12:38 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      This is sometimes called the "Prius fallacy "because of how the statistics are interpreted. It goes something like this, since the Prius gets much better gas mileage than the average car, Prius drivers drive more than the average driver so they use more fuel than their average driver counterparts. This argument was presented to show that cars like the Prius actually use more gasoline than non-hybrid cars so they are a waste of money. Of course the counter argument was these statistics were wrong or showed an insignificant difference. My belief is the statistics were right but the interpretation was agenda driven.

      I'm not going to use statistics, I going to use my experience and actions. I didn't buy my Prius to save the planet, sorry. I bought it to save money. I know what a horrible person I am not buying a gas guzzler so I could save some money for myself. It did cost more at first but I read with the gas I saved in the long run the payback would be in about 5 years. Yes the state waived their sales tax on my first Prius which helped me help Toyota and their local dealership.

      One of the implications the "Prius rebound effect" implies is that the increased driving around from hybrid cars are just what we Prius drivers like to do. Not really. First, in my job I visit homes that sometimes can be a real trek. It's an option to visit homes for me and without the Prius I may opt to not do it. Second, when my wife and I go on long distance vacation trips we use the hybrid car instead of not going at all. I imagine a lot of people have put off vacations or chose short distance vacations due to the price of gasoline. Third, my wife commutes to work in the next county and when we bought our last car she wanted a car that gets the best miles per gallon to save money. So we are now a two Prius family. I imagine a good number of people who find they are using a lot of gasoline in their commute to work buy high mpg hybrids such as the Prius. It may mean the difference of getting a better quality job in the next county or no job at all if one looks local.

      I can see there is truth to the "Prius rebound effect". Prius drivers while getting more miles per gallon do tend to drive more and as a result are paying more, not less, in gas taxes than their non-hybrid counterparts.

      So what did I do with that extra money saved on gas? With the money I saved I bought things and you know what the state received a sales tax from those things and the stores paid income tax on the profits they made on those sales.

      Therefore if a state in this country thinks they are gaining money by slapping on a hybrid fee-tax and thus discouraging the sale of high mpg hybrids, they are just wrong. They will lose money.

      IMHO,
      Aaron
      `02 Prius
      137K miles
      Please stay on the Prius topic
    • Jon Wilson
      I agree. Yes, I drive my Prius more than I drove my previous vehicle. BUT now my wife drives her gas guzzler less because she rides with me rather than me
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 2 5:25 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        I agree.
        Yes, I drive my Prius more than I drove my previous vehicle. BUT now my
        wife drives her gas guzzler less because she rides with me rather than
        me riding with her. Our total mileage has been somewhat greater the last
        few years. That is because I now tend to drive rather than fly if my
        travel destination is within a day's drive. I present seminars and short
        courses, so I travel a lot. Still, my 2005 has only just over 105,000
        miles. That is about 13,000 miles per year. My previous vehicle logged
        about 11,000.
        Jon

        On 3/2/2013 1:38 PM, docaaron1 wrote:
        > This is sometimes called the "Prius fallacy "because of how the statistics are interpreted. It goes something like this, since the Prius gets much better gas mileage than the average car, Prius drivers drive more than the average driver so they use more fuel than their average driver counterparts. This argument was presented to show that cars like the Prius actually use more gasoline than non-hybrid cars so they are a waste of money. Of course the counter argument was these statistics were wrong or showed an insignificant difference. My belief is the statistics were right but the interpretation was agenda driven.
        >
        > I'm not going to use statistics, I going to use my experience and actions. I didn't buy my Prius to save the planet, sorry. I bought it to save money. I know what a horrible person I am not buying a gas guzzler so I could save some money for myself. It did cost more at first but I read with the gas I saved in the long run the payback would be in about 5 years. Yes the state waived their sales tax on my first Prius which helped me help Toyota and their local dealership.
        >
        > One of the implications the "Prius rebound effect" implies is that the increased driving around from hybrid cars are just what we Prius drivers like to do. Not really. First, in my job I visit homes that sometimes can be a real trek. It's an option to visit homes for me and without the Prius I may opt to not do it. Second, when my wife and I go on long distance vacation trips we use the hybrid car instead of not going at all. I imagine a lot of people have put off vacations or chose short distance vacations due to the price of gasoline. Third, my wife commutes to work in the next county and when we bought our last car she wanted a car that gets the best miles per gallon to save money. So we are now a two Prius family. I imagine a good number of people who find they are using a lot of gasoline in their commute to work buy high mpg hybrids such as the Prius. It may mean the difference of getting a better quality job in the next county or no job at all if one looks local.
        >
        > I can see there is truth to the "Prius rebound effect". Prius drivers while getting more miles per gallon do tend to drive more and as a result are paying more, not less, in gas taxes than their non-hybrid counterparts.
        >
        > So what did I do with that extra money saved on gas? With the money I saved I bought things and you know what the state received a sales tax from those things and the stores paid income tax on the profits they made on those sales.
        >
        > Therefore if a state in this country thinks they are gaining money by slapping on a hybrid fee-tax and thus discouraging the sale of high mpg hybrids, they are just wrong. They will lose money.
        >
        > IMHO,
        > Aaron
        > `02 Prius
        > 137K miles
        > Please stay on the Prius topic
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.