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Re: [Tomy Tutor ] My new website

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  • Cameron Kaiser
    ... I m wondering if the (so far poorly understood) banking logic is to blame. The Tutor has a lot more ROM to worry about and deal with than the TI. Tutti 0.3
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 30, 2002
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      > > ObTutor: Great things are afoot on the GBASIC front -- stay tuned for a
      > > very complete analysis, and the first steps towards a working GBASIC
      > > model in Tutti. I'm still fleshing out the syntax tree (there's a lot of
      >
      > Well, for the third time, I have failed to make an emulator for the
      > Tomy Tutor. I really gave it a good try this last time, too.

      I'm wondering if the (so far poorly understood) banking logic is to blame.
      The Tutor has a lot more ROM to worry about and deal with than the TI.

      Tutti 0.3 is nearly done. I'm not going to put the GBASIC interpreter in it
      yet (I'm not finished figuring out all the quirks), but it will have some
      semblance of a GBASIC mode, and I'll probably enable some sort of file
      access from the MONitor. I fixed all the bugs from before and cleaned up the
      GRAPHICs mode raster flicker, too. It's not perfect but it's cleaner.

      Also working on a comparison architecture between the TI series and the Tomy
      (hey, does anyone know if the 9995 in the 99/2 and 99/8 is also muxed?),
      updating all the old information, and I might work on a Tutor-ial page for
      getting started with the Tutor, GRAPHICs mode, etc.

      --
      ----------------------------- personal page: http://www.armory.com/~spectre/ --
      Cameron Kaiser, Point Loma Nazarene University * ckaiser@...
      -- Well done is better than well said. -- Benjamin Franklin -------------------
    • David S. Brain
      OK, first let me apologize to everyone. The message about the Commie computers was SUPPOSED to go to Swap personally. I had just got out of bed and was
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 30, 2002
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        OK, first let me apologize to everyone. The message about the Commie
        computers was SUPPOSED to go to Swap personally. I had just got out of
        bed and was obviously not fully awake when I wrote and sent that letter.
        I don't mean to start any wars, especially when I'm outnumbered here
        (and most places as there were approximately 6.8 C64s sold for every
        TI-99 sold).

        Second, how did the Panasonic JR200 pop up in the Tomy Tutor group? I'm
        not even sure I knew what group I was in when I got the link to the
        website :/
        --
        Davey Brain
        dsbrain@...
        http://www.neosplice.com/~dsbrain/

        <<--Unfortunately in Win98 today, Netscape 7.0-->>
        <<--AMD Athlon 1700XP+ S3 ProSavageDDR 4X AGP-->>

        emucompboy wrote:
        > The Commodore 64 was superior to the Panasonic JR-200U in every
        > respect except for Commie BASIC lacking sound and graphic commands.
        >
        > If you've been programming the Panasonic JR, you've probably
        > discovered that its BASIC sound commands are nothing to write home
        > about anyway -- and the sound quality (almost-square waves) is not
        > great.
        >
        > But we're discussing this in the wrong group. This thread should be
        > in Home Computers and not in Tomy Tutor.
        >
      • swap_and_shop
        Davey, you have nothing to apologize for. To everybody else; I personally don t mind these types of conversations as long as they are civil,-- And I know all
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 30, 2002
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          Davey, you have nothing to apologize for.


          To everybody else;



          I personally don't mind these types of conversations as long as they
          are civil,-- And I know all of us are old enough and wise enough to
          be civil. :)

          I remember having heated debates when I was 14 yrs old about the
          C=64, (and that was 16 years ago), and I don't need to rehash that
          part of my youth. :)

          Secondly, there has been little to talk about on the Club board, so I
          personally don't mind if we discuss other machines, unless you all
          have a problem with doing so. I don't like to censor people unless
          it is for something entirely inappropiate.

          Thirdly, I consider all of us to be friends who have similiar
          collecting hobbies. If you want to talk about other vintage
          computers, please fill free to do so. Or, as an example, if you own a
          vintage car and want to talk about it, then do so.

          This is a free speech board...


          whew.... . :)

          swap

          Happy New Year!
        • emucompboy
          I want to collect it before you do, but you seem to have a larger supply of $$$ and space than I do, not to mention a quicker finger on the E-Bay Bid button!
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 30, 2002
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            I want to collect it before you do, but you seem to have a larger
            supply of $$$ and space than I do, not to mention a quicker finger on
            the E-Bay Bid button!

            :)



            --- In tomytutor@yahoogroups.com, swap_and_shop <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            >
            > Thirdly, I consider all of us to be friends who have similiar
            > collecting hobbies. If you want to talk about other vintage
            > computers, please fill free to do so. Or, as an example, if you own
            a
            > vintage car and want to talk about it, then do so.
          • Jeff White
            Cameron Kaiser wrote: ... Tomy ... The 9995 muxes the databus always. The 9995 is the indirect descendant of the 9985
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 30, 2002
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              "Cameron Kaiser" <spectre@...> wrote:
              <snip>
              > Also working on a comparison architecture between the TI series and the
              Tomy
              > (hey, does anyone know if the 9995 in the 99/2 and 99/8 is also muxed?),
              > updating all the old information, and I might work on a Tutor-ial page for
              > getting started with the Tutor, GRAPHICs mode, etc.

              The 9995 muxes the databus always. The 9995 is the indirect descendant of
              the 9985 that was supposed to be in the 99/4 -- which instead got a 9900
              kludged to work similarly to the 9985. The 99/8 uses a special version of
              the 9995 that disables most of the on-chip RAM. Not sure about the 99/2.

              Jeff White
              jhwhite@...
            • Cameron Kaiser
              ... Explain this. Is there another $8300 page RAM out there in the 99/8? Is that page connected by the same 16-bit wide path as the 9900 s, or muxed in the
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 30, 2002
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                > The 9995 muxes the databus always. The 9995 is the indirect descendant of
                > the 9985 that was supposed to be in the 99/4 -- which instead got a 9900
                > kludged to work similarly to the 9985. The 99/8 uses a special version of
                > the 9995 that disables most of the on-chip RAM.

                Explain this. Is there another "$8300 page" RAM out there in the 99/8?
                Is that page connected by the same 16-bit wide path as the 9900's, or muxed
                in the same way as the rest of memory access? And what's most of the RAM?

                --
                ----------------------------- personal page: http://www.armory.com/~spectre/ --
                Cameron Kaiser, Point Loma Nazarene University * ckaiser@...
                -- A dean is to faculty as a hydrant is to a dog. -- Alfred Kahn --------------
              • Jeff White
                ... of ... of ... muxed ... The off-the-shelf 9995 has 256 bytes of on-chip RAM at F000-F0F9 and ... on-chip decrementer and FFFC-FFFF is the NMI
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 30, 2002
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                  > > The 9995 muxes the databus always. The 9995 is the indirect descendant
                  of
                  > > the 9985 that was supposed to be in the 99/4 -- which instead got a 9900
                  > > kludged to work similarly to the 9985. The 99/8 uses a special version
                  of
                  > > the 9995 that disables most of the on-chip RAM.
                  >
                  > Explain this. Is there another "$8300 page" RAM out there in the 99/8?
                  > Is that page connected by the same 16-bit wide path as the 9900's, or
                  muxed
                  > in the same way as the rest of memory access? And what's most of the RAM?

                  The off-the-shelf 9995 has 256 bytes of on-chip RAM at >F000-F0F9 and
                  >FFFA-FFFF that is on the 16-bit internal bus. The word at >FFFA is the
                  on-chip decrementer and >FFFC-FFFF is the NMI (non-maskable interrupt, or
                  Load, vector). From what I understand, having never studied the 99/8 in
                  detail, it has the on-chip RAM at >F000-F0F9 disabled. The Myarc Geneve
                  9640 uses a standard 9995 and 8K memory pages. Because the 9995 does not
                  disable the external bus during writes, accessing a page mapped to
                  >E000-FFFF in the areas >F000-F0F9 and >FFFA-FFFF will mess with even bytes
                  in the page. Internally a 16-bit operation is happenning, but only the even
                  data byte shows on the external bus.

                  With regard to the "$8300 page" RAM: This is the CPU PAD of the 99/4A and
                  the only directly accessible CPU RAM in a stock console. The standard 16K
                  RAM of the 99/4A is indirectly accessed via the VDP, the TMS9918A in North
                  American consoles. Much of the console ROM and GROM and peripheral ROM
                  (DSR's) is written such that the CPU PAD can be relocated.

                  E.g., the disk controllers typically report error codes at >8350. In the TI
                  floppy disk controller source code, that error code may have been written
                  with an instruction such as "MOV @ERR12,@>0050(R9)". The workspace register
                  R9 in the case of the 99/4A contains >8300. The 99/8 could have its CPU PAD
                  elsewhere.

                  Jeff White
                  jhwhite@...
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