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Re: [tmboptical] Re: First Light

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  • Roy Ramdeen
    Second that Junn, I am the proud owner of #63. This scope sometimes I think is better than my AP Traveler. It is certainly a standard for the 4 class. Roy
    Message 1 of 25 , Aug 21, 2010
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      Second that Junn, I am the proud owner of #63. This scope sometimes I think is better than my AP Traveler. It is certainly a standard for the 4" class.

      Roy
      E=mc²

      On Aug 20, 2010, at 4:07 AM, "Junn Chavez" <dchavezjr@...> wrote:

      > Eric,
      >
      > Your comment about the 105mm f/6.2 scope made my day :) I am also a lucky owner of the late Thomas Back's superb 105mm CNC scope. It's really one of the best 4" scopes out there, or should I say the "perfect" example.
      >
      > Clear skies,
      >
      > Junn
      >
      > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Jamison" <ericjam@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi Rick,
      > >
      > > Thanks for posting your observations with the TMB 130SS. I think our
      > > backgrounds are somewhat similar. I began observing the night sky with the
      > > unaided eye in the 1950's, and purchased my first scope in the early 1970's.
      > > I have owned 28 scopes since then and tried many other at star parties,
      > > however I consider my TMB 175mm f/8, 130mm f/9.25, and 105mm f/6.2 to be the
      > > best optical telescopes of all of them.
      > >
      > > Best,
      > >
      > > Eric Jamison
      > > http://mysite.verizon.net/ericjam/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: "starguy" <starguy@...>
      > > To: <tmboptical@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2010 9:56 AM
      > > Subject: [tmboptical] First Light
      > >
      > >
      > > After what seemed like a small eternity finally had a chance to get the TMB
      > > out - Skies weren't great but at least no clouds or rain -
      > >
      > > Mounted on a CGEM - My first view was Vega - Unbelievable - absolutely no
      > > color dead pinprick of light - My views that evening included some clusters
      > > (M4 - M13 etc) Planetaries(M52 -M27) and so on. I used a variety of
      > > eyepieces which included Radians, orthos, Burgess TMBs, old Research Grade
      > > 20mm and 15.5mm Erfles - Series 4000 and 5000 Meade SWAs - Pretty much the
      > > whole gamut.
      > >
      > > In every case I was totally enthralled with the views. Again, stars were
      > > absolute pinpricks of light, no fringing, no spikes, just points.
      > > The diffraction pattern was "perfect" -
      > >
      > > I waited for Jupiter to clear the trees and that's when I knew I had the
      > > right scope. I had never seen detail like that before. The colors were as
      > > the photo's. Detail within the belts was obvious.
      > >
      > > I have been doing this for over 54 years. Had a lot scopes - Currently I
      > > have the TMB, a C11 (carbon fiber tube, crayford) 8" LX90, 1970's vintage C8
      > > and C5 - Meade AR5 -
      > >
      > > My scope of choice The TMB 130SS - My skies (as with probably most of us)
      > > are horribly light polluted. This scope seems to cut through that better
      > > than any of the other scopes - The images this instrument displays are as
      > > good as it gets - I cannot imagine a more "perfect" set of optics.
      > >
      > > The interferometer pictures of this lens are astounding - Dead parallel
      > > lines -
      > >
      > > I know there is no Nirvana when it comes to scopes but this is as close as I
      > > have ever seen. I look back of the scopes that are gone that were once
      > > "keepers", this one will be with me until I'm gone -
      > >
      > > If I were to look at a downside it would be of course aperture. It cannot
      > > resolve M13 like the C11 however the C11 does not have the purity of image
      > > on Jupiter - Which to I consider the most important - Both, that's why I
      > > have both - All the other socpes will go except my pets, the C8 and C5.
      > > There is a story behind these that has nothing to do with an evaluation.
      > >
      > > Rest assure fellow TMB'rs these are great scopes and hold 2nd place to no
      > > one.
      > >
      > > Rick H
      > >
      > > Same skies, older eyes
      > >
      > > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Looking for a report, when you have had a good look through it.
      > > >
      > > > Roy
      > > > E=mc²
      > > >
      > > > On Jul 24, 2010, at 3:41 PM, "starguy" <starguy@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > Hello everyone - I just acquired a 130ss - I purchased it from a well
      > > known astronomer who had it built for him and hand finished by Thomas Back -
      > > > >
      > > > > Looking forward to seeing what this scope is capable of. All of the
      > > reviews and threads show that this is a world class refractor
      > > > >
      > > > > I have been an amateur for over 54 years, went through a lot of scopes,
      > > and am very excited about this one.
      > > > >
      > > > > Thanks for the group
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • starguy
      Yep, we arguably have the best APO s made. As I mentioned, I was lucky and got mine from a well known astronomer. He was in contact with Thomas Back throughout
      Message 2 of 25 , Aug 21, 2010
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        Yep, we arguably have the best APO's made. As I mentioned, I was lucky and got mine from a well known astronomer. He was in contact with Thomas Back throughout the process.

        I had a chance this week to do some lunar observations and all I can say is WOW! I had this thing pushed way beyond theoretical limit and it still gave an incredible image.

        I have also found it is very forgiving with eyepieces. It seems the less glass the better. I used everything from Panoptics - Orho's -Plossl's - Kellner - Erfle - TMB planetary - pretty much you name it - it all looked good.

        The only thing I can remember that gave this much contrast was a 6" f/10 Newtonian I had years ago, and I may be wrong on that just because of the years.

        In all these years I've had "keepers" come and go - I think this time I'll go before this scope does.

        We have an elite piece of equipment and should be proud to own it. No hype, no sales talk, just performance.

        --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "mrgrytt" <mrgrytt@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Anyone who has an original CNC scope that came through Thomas is a very lucky person. They are as good as it gets.
        >
        > Harvey
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Junn Chavez" <dchavezjr@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Eric,
        > >
        > > Your comment about the 105mm f/6.2 scope made my day :) I am also a lucky owner of the late Thomas Back's superb 105mm CNC scope. It's really one of the best 4" scopes out there, or should I say the "perfect" example.
        > >
        > > Clear skies,
        > >
        > > Junn
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Jamison" <ericjam@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hi Rick,
        > > >
        > > > Thanks for posting your observations with the TMB 130SS. I think our
        > > > backgrounds are somewhat similar. I began observing the night sky with the
        > > > unaided eye in the 1950's, and purchased my first scope in the early 1970's.
        > > > I have owned 28 scopes since then and tried many other at star parties,
        > > > however I consider my TMB 175mm f/8, 130mm f/9.25, and 105mm f/6.2 to be the
        > > > best optical telescopes of all of them.
        > > >
        > > > Best,
        > > >
        > > > Eric Jamison
        > > > http://mysite.verizon.net/ericjam/
        >
      • Terry Tuggle
        You want to make it better; try the FL-D; it works well on Mars and Jupiter, and improves the rings some on Saturn and works better than any other filter I
        Message 3 of 25 , Aug 21, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          You want to make it better; try the FL-D; it works well on Mars and Jupiter,
          and improves the rings some on Saturn and works better than any other filter
          I have tried on the Moon; increases detail!

          http://www.adorama.com/Als/BW46FLD.html

          You will need the step down adapter:

          http://www.adorama.com/Als/FLD4846.html



          And if you want to lower the light some try the B+W polarizing filter;
          you have two choices:

          http://www.adorama.com/Als/BW48CPL.html

          And the Kaesemann filter, which is the highest quality, originally made for
          APO camera lenses:

          http://www.adorama.com/Als/BW48CPLKM.html

          They will provide a better view than ND filters; I have tried both.



          All the best,

          Terry



          _____

          From: tmboptical@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tmboptical@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of starguy
          Sent: Saturday, August 21, 2010 11:31 AM
          To: tmboptical@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [tmboptical] Re: First Light





          Yep, we arguably have the best APO's made. As I mentioned, I was lucky and
          got mine from a well known astronomer. He was in contact with Thomas Back
          throughout the process.

          I had a chance this week to do some lunar observations and all I can say is
          WOW! I had this thing pushed way beyond theoretical limit and it still gave
          an incredible image.

          I have also found it is very forgiving with eyepieces. It seems the less
          glass the better. I used everything from Panoptics - Orho's -Plossl's -
          Kellner - Erfle - TMB planetary - pretty much you name it - it all looked
          good.

          The only thing I can remember that gave this much contrast was a 6" f/10
          Newtonian I had years ago, and I may be wrong on that just because of the
          years.

          In all these years I've had "keepers" come and go - I think this time I'll
          go before this scope does.

          We have an elite piece of equipment and should be proud to own it. No hype,
          no sales talk, just performance.

          --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com <mailto:tmboptical%40yahoogroups.com> ,
          "mrgrytt" <mrgrytt@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Anyone who has an original CNC scope that came through Thomas is a very
          lucky person. They are as good as it gets.
          >
          > Harvey
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com <mailto:tmboptical%40yahoogroups.com> ,
          "Junn Chavez" <dchavezjr@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Eric,
          > >
          > > Your comment about the 105mm f/6.2 scope made my day :) I am also a
          lucky owner of the late Thomas Back's superb 105mm CNC scope. It's really
          one of the best 4" scopes out there, or should I say the "perfect" example.
          > >
          > > Clear skies,
          > >
          > > Junn
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com <mailto:tmboptical%40yahoogroups.com>
          , "Eric Jamison" <ericjam@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi Rick,
          > > >
          > > > Thanks for posting your observations with the TMB 130SS. I think our
          > > > backgrounds are somewhat similar. I began observing the night sky with
          the
          > > > unaided eye in the 1950's, and purchased my first scope in the early
          1970's.
          > > > I have owned 28 scopes since then and tried many other at star
          parties,
          > > > however I consider my TMB 175mm f/8, 130mm f/9.25, and 105mm f/6.2 to
          be the
          > > > best optical telescopes of all of them.
          > > >
          > > > Best,
          > > >
          > > > Eric Jamison
          > > > http://mysite.verizon.net/ericjam/
          >





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Junn Chavez
          Roy, When I was based in the US (2004) I had the upportunity of comparing side-by-side an AP Traveler and TMB 105/650. I really can t tell the visual
          Message 4 of 25 , Aug 29, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Roy,

            When I was based in the US (2004) I had the upportunity of comparing side-by-side an AP Traveler and TMB 105/650. I really can't tell the visual difference between the two on Jupiter, Moon and some bright DSOs. Under the city lights of Fremont CA, seeing the Crab Nebula for the first time made me want to own either of the two. Luckily, the owner sold me his TMB because he said it's too heavy. I wrote him a check and the rest is history. I've already spent countless hours with my TMB scope and always remember Thomas Back (RIP) whenever I look up at the stars.

            I was on the Traveler list since July 2001, even if AP will revive the list I won't order one. My TMB scope is a keeper!

            The very first astrophoto I took was the half Moon; I emailed it to Tom and he was delighted. I placed the photo in the album under my name, I just hope it was uploaded properly.

            Clear skies to all.

            --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@...> wrote:
            >
            > Second that Junn, I am the proud owner of #63. This scope sometimes I think is better than my AP Traveler. It is certainly a standard for the 4" class.
            >
            > Roy
            > E=mc²
            >
            > On Aug 20, 2010, at 4:07 AM, "Junn Chavez" <dchavezjr@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Eric,
            > >
            > > Your comment about the 105mm f/6.2 scope made my day :) I am also a lucky owner of the late Thomas Back's superb 105mm CNC scope. It's really one of the best 4" scopes out there, or should I say the "perfect" example.
            > >
            > > Clear skies,
            > >
            > > Junn
            > >
            > > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Jamison" <ericjam@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hi Rick,
            > > >
            > > > Thanks for posting your observations with the TMB 130SS. I think our
            > > > backgrounds are somewhat similar. I began observing the night sky with the
            > > > unaided eye in the 1950's, and purchased my first scope in the early 1970's.
            > > > I have owned 28 scopes since then and tried many other at star parties,
            > > > however I consider my TMB 175mm f/8, 130mm f/9.25, and 105mm f/6.2 to be the
            > > > best optical telescopes of all of them.
            > > >
            > > > Best,
            > > >
            > > > Eric Jamison
            > > > http://mysite.verizon.net/ericjam/
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > > From: "starguy" <starguy@>
            > > > To: <tmboptical@yahoogroups.com>
            > > > Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2010 9:56 AM
            > > > Subject: [tmboptical] First Light
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > After what seemed like a small eternity finally had a chance to get the TMB
            > > > out - Skies weren't great but at least no clouds or rain -
            > > >
            > > > Mounted on a CGEM - My first view was Vega - Unbelievable - absolutely no
            > > > color dead pinprick of light - My views that evening included some clusters
            > > > (M4 - M13 etc) Planetaries(M52 -M27) and so on. I used a variety of
            > > > eyepieces which included Radians, orthos, Burgess TMBs, old Research Grade
            > > > 20mm and 15.5mm Erfles - Series 4000 and 5000 Meade SWAs - Pretty much the
            > > > whole gamut.
            > > >
            > > > In every case I was totally enthralled with the views. Again, stars were
            > > > absolute pinpricks of light, no fringing, no spikes, just points.
            > > > The diffraction pattern was "perfect" -
            > > >
            > > > I waited for Jupiter to clear the trees and that's when I knew I had the
            > > > right scope. I had never seen detail like that before. The colors were as
            > > > the photo's. Detail within the belts was obvious.
            > > >
            > > > I have been doing this for over 54 years. Had a lot scopes - Currently I
            > > > have the TMB, a C11 (carbon fiber tube, crayford) 8" LX90, 1970's vintage C8
            > > > and C5 - Meade AR5 -
            > > >
            > > > My scope of choice The TMB 130SS - My skies (as with probably most of us)
            > > > are horribly light polluted. This scope seems to cut through that better
            > > > than any of the other scopes - The images this instrument displays are as
            > > > good as it gets - I cannot imagine a more "perfect" set of optics.
            > > >
            > > > The interferometer pictures of this lens are astounding - Dead parallel
            > > > lines -
            > > >
            > > > I know there is no Nirvana when it comes to scopes but this is as close as I
            > > > have ever seen. I look back of the scopes that are gone that were once
            > > > "keepers", this one will be with me until I'm gone -
            > > >
            > > > If I were to look at a downside it would be of course aperture. It cannot
            > > > resolve M13 like the C11 however the C11 does not have the purity of image
            > > > on Jupiter - Which to I consider the most important - Both, that's why I
            > > > have both - All the other socpes will go except my pets, the C8 and C5.
            > > > There is a story behind these that has nothing to do with an evaluation.
            > > >
            > > > Rest assure fellow TMB'rs these are great scopes and hold 2nd place to no
            > > > one.
            > > >
            > > > Rick H
            > > >
            > > > Same skies, older eyes
            > > >
            > > > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Looking for a report, when you have had a good look through it.
            > > > >
            > > > > Roy
            > > > > E=mc²
            > > > >
            > > > > On Jul 24, 2010, at 3:41 PM, "starguy" <starguy@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > > Hello everyone - I just acquired a 130ss - I purchased it from a well
            > > > known astronomer who had it built for him and hand finished by Thomas Back -
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Looking forward to seeing what this scope is capable of. All of the
            > > > reviews and threads show that this is a world class refractor
            > > > > >
            > > > > > I have been an amateur for over 54 years, went through a lot of scopes,
            > > > and am very excited about this one.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Thanks for the group
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ------------------------------------
            > > >
            > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • mrgrytt
            If the small amount of extra weight isn t a problem for you then there s certainly no need to switch scopes. I ve had my 105/650 for almost 9 years now and I
            Message 5 of 25 , Aug 29, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              If the small amount of extra weight isn't a problem for you then there's certainly no need to switch scopes.
              I've had my 105/650 for almost 9 years now and I bought it based on a recommendation from a person who had sold his Traveler after buying a 105/650 and comparing them.
              Not saying anything bad about the Traveler at all because it's a great lightweight package and it does have a size and weight advantage. Optically I don't think there's much difference but I would bet that the TMB has better color correction. I can't say anything for sure because I've never used a Traveler.

              Harvey


              --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Junn Chavez" <dchavezjr@...> wrote:
              >
              > Roy,
              >
              > When I was based in the US (2004) I had the upportunity of comparing side-by-side an AP Traveler and TMB 105/650. I really can't tell the visual difference between the two on Jupiter, Moon and some bright DSOs. Under the city lights of Fremont CA, seeing the Crab Nebula for the first time made me want to own either of the two. Luckily, the owner sold me his TMB because he said it's too heavy. I wrote him a check and the rest is history. I've already spent countless hours with my TMB scope and always remember Thomas Back (RIP) whenever I look up at the stars.
              >
              > I was on the Traveler list since July 2001, even if AP will revive the list I won't order one. My TMB scope is a keeper!
              >
              > The very first astrophoto I took was the half Moon; I emailed it to Tom and he was delighted. I placed the photo in the album under my name, I just hope it was uploaded properly.
              >
              > Clear skies to all.
            • Roy Ramdeen
              The original CNC s are all keepers. If you have one pass it down in your will. Anything after Tomas is so so. I seldom use my TMB s anymore, because it would
              Message 6 of 25 , Sep 2, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                The original CNC's are all keepers. If you have one pass it down in your will. Anything after Tomas is so so. I seldom use my TMB's anymore, because it would be very difficult to get another. A few folks disagree with with that, don't care the prize goes on the mantel. I had both my traveler and the 105 one night on M-57 and the views were almost identical, except for one reason the Traveler had a very slightly better color correction, and if you didn't know what to look for you couldn't tell. I spoke to Tomas about it, and he was most willing to test and give me another, but I was very happy with the one I had.

                As the story goes Tomas was a stickler for very good optics, and wanted the very best in his then German tubes. It got to the point where he was rejecting way too many glass from his supplier lytkarino optical glass (LZOS) from Russia because they weren't meeting his stringent standards. Tomas made great astronomical equipment that even rivaled Astrophysics at the time. I am lucky to own 3 of his early scopes that are treasures. My work horses are my AP scopes.

                Roy
                E=mc²

                On Aug 29, 2010, at 12:19 PM, "Junn Chavez" <dchavezjr@...> wrote:

                > Roy,
                >
                > When I was based in the US (2004) I had the upportunity of comparing side-by-side an AP Traveler and TMB 105/650. I really can't tell the visual difference between the two on Jupiter, Moon and some bright DSOs. Under the city lights of Fremont CA, seeing the Crab Nebula for the first time made me want to own either of the two. Luckily, the owner sold me his TMB because he said it's too heavy. I wrote him a check and the rest is history. I've already spent countless hours with my TMB scope and always remember Thomas Back (RIP) whenever I look up at the stars.
                >
                > I was on the Traveler list since July 2001, even if AP will revive the list I won't order one. My TMB scope is a keeper!
                >
                > The very first astrophoto I took was the half Moon; I emailed it to Tom and he was delighted. I placed the photo in the album under my name, I just hope it was uploaded properly.
                >
                > Clear skies to all.
                >
                > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Second that Junn, I am the proud owner of #63. This scope sometimes I think is better than my AP Traveler. It is certainly a standard for the 4" class.
                > >
                > > Roy
                > > E=mc²
                > >
                > > On Aug 20, 2010, at 4:07 AM, "Junn Chavez" <dchavezjr@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > > Eric,
                > > >
                > > > Your comment about the 105mm f/6.2 scope made my day :) I am also a lucky owner of the late Thomas Back's superb 105mm CNC scope. It's really one of the best 4" scopes out there, or should I say the "perfect" example.
                > > >
                > > > Clear skies,
                > > >
                > > > Junn
                > > >
                > > > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Jamison" <ericjam@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Hi Rick,
                > > > >
                > > > > Thanks for posting your observations with the TMB 130SS. I think our
                > > > > backgrounds are somewhat similar. I began observing the night sky with the
                > > > > unaided eye in the 1950's, and purchased my first scope in the early 1970's.
                > > > > I have owned 28 scopes since then and tried many other at star parties,
                > > > > however I consider my TMB 175mm f/8, 130mm f/9.25, and 105mm f/6.2 to be the
                > > > > best optical telescopes of all of them.
                > > > >
                > > > > Best,
                > > > >
                > > > > Eric Jamison
                > > > > http://mysite.verizon.net/ericjam/
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > > > From: "starguy" <starguy@>
                > > > > To: <tmboptical@yahoogroups.com>
                > > > > Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2010 9:56 AM
                > > > > Subject: [tmboptical] First Light
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > After what seemed like a small eternity finally had a chance to get the TMB
                > > > > out - Skies weren't great but at least no clouds or rain -
                > > > >
                > > > > Mounted on a CGEM - My first view was Vega - Unbelievable - absolutely no
                > > > > color dead pinprick of light - My views that evening included some clusters
                > > > > (M4 - M13 etc) Planetaries(M52 -M27) and so on. I used a variety of
                > > > > eyepieces which included Radians, orthos, Burgess TMBs, old Research Grade
                > > > > 20mm and 15.5mm Erfles - Series 4000 and 5000 Meade SWAs - Pretty much the
                > > > > whole gamut.
                > > > >
                > > > > In every case I was totally enthralled with the views. Again, stars were
                > > > > absolute pinpricks of light, no fringing, no spikes, just points.
                > > > > The diffraction pattern was "perfect" -
                > > > >
                > > > > I waited for Jupiter to clear the trees and that's when I knew I had the
                > > > > right scope. I had never seen detail like that before. The colors were as
                > > > > the photo's. Detail within the belts was obvious.
                > > > >
                > > > > I have been doing this for over 54 years. Had a lot scopes - Currently I
                > > > > have the TMB, a C11 (carbon fiber tube, crayford) 8" LX90, 1970's vintage C8
                > > > > and C5 - Meade AR5 -
                > > > >
                > > > > My scope of choice The TMB 130SS - My skies (as with probably most of us)
                > > > > are horribly light polluted. This scope seems to cut through that better
                > > > > than any of the other scopes - The images this instrument displays are as
                > > > > good as it gets - I cannot imagine a more "perfect" set of optics.
                > > > >
                > > > > The interferometer pictures of this lens are astounding - Dead parallel
                > > > > lines -
                > > > >
                > > > > I know there is no Nirvana when it comes to scopes but this is as close as I
                > > > > have ever seen. I look back of the scopes that are gone that were once
                > > > > "keepers", this one will be with me until I'm gone -
                > > > >
                > > > > If I were to look at a downside it would be of course aperture. It cannot
                > > > > resolve M13 like the C11 however the C11 does not have the purity of image
                > > > > on Jupiter - Which to I consider the most important - Both, that's why I
                > > > > have both - All the other socpes will go except my pets, the C8 and C5.
                > > > > There is a story behind these that has nothing to do with an evaluation.
                > > > >
                > > > > Rest assure fellow TMB'rs these are great scopes and hold 2nd place to no
                > > > > one.
                > > > >
                > > > > Rick H
                > > > >
                > > > > Same skies, older eyes
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@> wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Looking for a report, when you have had a good look through it.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Roy
                > > > > > E=mc²
                > > > > >
                > > > > > On Jul 24, 2010, at 3:41 PM, "starguy" <starguy@> wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > > Hello everyone - I just acquired a 130ss - I purchased it from a well
                > > > > known astronomer who had it built for him and hand finished by Thomas Back -
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Looking forward to seeing what this scope is capable of. All of the
                > > > > reviews and threads show that this is a world class refractor
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > I have been an amateur for over 54 years, went through a lot of scopes,
                > > > > and am very excited about this one.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Thanks for the group
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > ------------------------------------
                > > > >
                > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Wally Lucas
                I have a 152 from 2003...very fine instrument...  Thomas mentioned to me that mine had one of the best contrast of any that he had yet tested...at first i
                Message 7 of 25 , Sep 3, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  I have a 152 from 2003...very fine instrument...  Thomas mentioned to me that mine had one of the best contrast of any that he had yet tested...at first i thought it was  abit of salesmanship--later I learned that Thomas had no such aversions. 
                   
                   

                  --- On Thu, 9/2/10, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@...> wrote:


                  From: Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@...>
                  Subject: Re: [tmboptical] Re: First Light
                  To: "tmboptical@yahoogroups.com" <tmboptical@yahoogroups.com>
                  Date: Thursday, September 2, 2010, 5:53 PM


                   



                  The original CNC's are all keepers. If you have one pass it down in your will. Anything after Tomas is so so. I seldom use my TMB's anymore, because it would be very difficult to get another. A few folks disagree with with that, don't care the prize goes on the mantel. I had both my traveler and the 105 one night on M-57 and the views were almost identical, except for one reason the Traveler had a very slightly better color correction, and if you didn't know what to look for you couldn't tell. I spoke to Tomas about it, and he was most willing to test and give me another, but I was very happy with the one I had.

                  As the story goes Tomas was a stickler for very good optics, and wanted the very best in his then German tubes. It got to the point where he was rejecting way too many glass from his supplier lytkarino optical glass (LZOS) from Russia because they weren't meeting his stringent standards. Tomas made great astronomical equipment that even rivaled Astrophysics at the time. I am lucky to own 3 of his early scopes that are treasures. My work horses are my AP scopes.

                  Roy
                  E=mc²

                  On Aug 29, 2010, at 12:19 PM, "Junn Chavez" <dchavezjr@...> wrote:

                  > Roy,
                  >
                  > When I was based in the US (2004) I had the upportunity of comparing side-by-side an AP Traveler and TMB 105/650. I really can't tell the visual difference between the two on Jupiter, Moon and some bright DSOs. Under the city lights of Fremont CA, seeing the Crab Nebula for the first time made me want to own either of the two. Luckily, the owner sold me his TMB because he said it's too heavy. I wrote him a check and the rest is history. I've already spent countless hours with my TMB scope and always remember Thomas Back (RIP) whenever I look up at the stars.
                  >
                  > I was on the Traveler list since July 2001, even if AP will revive the list I won't order one. My TMB scope is a keeper!
                  >
                  > The very first astrophoto I took was the half Moon; I emailed it to Tom and he was delighted. I placed the photo in the album under my name, I just hope it was uploaded properly.
                  >
                  > Clear skies to all.
                  >
                  > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Second that Junn, I am the proud owner of #63. This scope sometimes I think is better than my AP Traveler. It is certainly a standard for the 4" class.
                  > >
                  > > Roy
                  > > E=mc²
                  > >
                  > > On Aug 20, 2010, at 4:07 AM, "Junn Chavez" <dchavezjr@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Eric,
                  > > >
                  > > > Your comment about the 105mm f/6.2 scope made my day :) I am also a lucky owner of the late Thomas Back's superb 105mm CNC scope. It's really one of the best 4" scopes out there, or should I say the "perfect" example.
                  > > >
                  > > > Clear skies,
                  > > >
                  > > > Junn
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Jamison" <ericjam@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Hi Rick,
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Thanks for posting your observations with the TMB 130SS. I think our
                  > > > > backgrounds are somewhat similar. I began observing the night sky with the
                  > > > > unaided eye in the 1950's, and purchased my first scope in the early 1970's.
                  > > > > I have owned 28 scopes since then and tried many other at star parties,
                  > > > > however I consider my TMB 175mm f/8, 130mm f/9.25, and 105mm f/6.2 to be the
                  > > > > best optical telescopes of all of them.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Best,
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Eric Jamison
                  > > > > http://mysite.verizon.net/ericjam/
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > > > From: "starguy" <starguy@>
                  > > > > To: <tmboptical@yahoogroups.com>
                  > > > > Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2010 9:56 AM
                  > > > > Subject: [tmboptical] First Light
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > After what seemed like a small eternity finally had a chance to get the TMB
                  > > > > out - Skies weren't great but at least no clouds or rain -
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Mounted on a CGEM - My first view was Vega - Unbelievable - absolutely no
                  > > > > color dead pinprick of light - My views that evening included some clusters
                  > > > > (M4 - M13 etc) Planetaries(M52 -M27) and so on. I used a variety of
                  > > > > eyepieces which included Radians, orthos, Burgess TMBs, old Research Grade
                  > > > > 20mm and 15.5mm Erfles - Series 4000 and 5000 Meade SWAs - Pretty much the
                  > > > > whole gamut.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > In every case I was totally enthralled with the views. Again, stars were
                  > > > > absolute pinpricks of light, no fringing, no spikes, just points.
                  > > > > The diffraction pattern was "perfect" -
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I waited for Jupiter to clear the trees and that's when I knew I had the
                  > > > > right scope. I had never seen detail like that before. The colors were as
                  > > > > the photo's. Detail within the belts was obvious.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I have been doing this for over 54 years. Had a lot scopes - Currently I
                  > > > > have the TMB, a C11 (carbon fiber tube, crayford) 8" LX90, 1970's vintage C8
                  > > > > and C5 - Meade AR5 -
                  > > > >
                  > > > > My scope of choice The TMB 130SS - My skies (as with probably most of us)
                  > > > > are horribly light polluted. This scope seems to cut through that better
                  > > > > than any of the other scopes - The images this instrument displays are as
                  > > > > good as it gets - I cannot imagine a more "perfect" set of optics.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > The interferometer pictures of this lens are astounding - Dead parallel
                  > > > > lines -
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I know there is no Nirvana when it comes to scopes but this is as close as I
                  > > > > have ever seen. I look back of the scopes that are gone that were once
                  > > > > "keepers", this one will be with me until I'm gone -
                  > > > >
                  > > > > If I were to look at a downside it would be of course aperture. It cannot
                  > > > > resolve M13 like the C11 however the C11 does not have the purity of image
                  > > > > on Jupiter - Which to I consider the most important - Both, that's why I
                  > > > > have both - All the other socpes will go except my pets, the C8 and C5.
                  > > > > There is a story behind these that has nothing to do with an evaluation.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Rest assure fellow TMB'rs these are great scopes and hold 2nd place to no
                  > > > > one.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Rick H
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Same skies, older eyes
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Looking for a report, when you have had a good look through it.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Roy
                  > > > > > E=mc²
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > On Jul 24, 2010, at 3:41 PM, "starguy" <starguy@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Hello everyone - I just acquired a 130ss - I purchased it from a well
                  > > > > known astronomer who had it built for him and hand finished by Thomas Back -
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Looking forward to seeing what this scope is capable of. All of the
                  > > > > reviews and threads show that this is a world class refractor
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > I have been an amateur for over 54 years, went through a lot of scopes,
                  > > > > and am very excited about this one.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Thanks for the group
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > ------------------------------------
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                  >

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