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First Light

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  • starguy
    After what seemed like a small eternity finally had a chance to get the TMB out - Skies weren t great but at least no clouds or rain - Mounted on a CGEM - My
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 10, 2010
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      After what seemed like a small eternity finally had a chance to get the TMB out - Skies weren't great but at least no clouds or rain -

      Mounted on a CGEM - My first view was Vega - Unbelievable - absolutely no color dead pinprick of light - My views that evening included some clusters (M4 - M13 etc) Planetaries(M52 -M27) and so on. I used a variety of eyepieces which included Radians, orthos, Burgess TMBs, old Research Grade 20mm and 15.5mm Erfles - Series 4000 and 5000 Meade SWAs - Pretty much the whole gamut.

      In every case I was totally enthralled with the views. Again, stars were absolute pinpricks of light, no fringing, no spikes, just points.
      The diffraction pattern was "perfect" -

      I waited for Jupiter to clear the trees and that's when I knew I had the right scope. I had never seen detail like that before. The colors were as the photo's. Detail within the belts was obvious.

      I have been doing this for over 54 years. Had a lot scopes - Currently I have the TMB, a C11 (carbon fiber tube, crayford) 8" LX90, 1970's vintage C8 and C5 - Meade AR5 -

      My scope of choice The TMB 130SS - My skies (as with probably most of us) are horribly light polluted. This scope seems to cut through that better than any of the other scopes - The images this instrument displays are as good as it gets - I cannot imagine a more "perfect" set of optics.

      The interferometer pictures of this lens are astounding - Dead parallel lines -

      I know there is no Nirvana when it comes to scopes but this is as close as I have ever seen. I look back of the scopes that are gone that were once "keepers", this one will be with me until I'm gone -

      If I were to look at a downside it would be of course aperture. It cannot resolve M13 like the C11 however the C11 does not have the purity of image on Jupiter - Which to I consider the most important - Both, that's why I have both - All the other socpes will go except my pets, the C8 and C5. There is a story behind these that has nothing to do with an evaluation.

      Rest assure fellow TMB'rs these are great scopes and hold 2nd place to no one.

      Rick H

      Same skies, older eyes

      --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@...> wrote:
      >
      > Looking for a report, when you have had a good look through it.
      >
      > Roy
      > E=mc²
      >
      > On Jul 24, 2010, at 3:41 PM, "starguy" <starguy@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Hello everyone - I just acquired a 130ss - I purchased it from a well known astronomer who had it built for him and hand finished by Thomas Back -
      > >
      > > Looking forward to seeing what this scope is capable of. All of the reviews and threads show that this is a world class refractor
      > >
      > > I have been an amateur for over 54 years, went through a lot of scopes, and am very excited about this one.
      > >
      > > Thanks for the group
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Wally Lucas
      Glad to hear that you are pleased with your TMB.  I bought a 152 in 2003 to view Mars...I still enjoy using it and get a special feeling when using it. 
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 10, 2010
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        Glad to hear that you are pleased with your TMB.  I bought a 152 in 2003 to view Mars...I still enjoy using it and get a special feeling when using it.  Also, I have a MS-11 with the CF tube. 
         
        I live in Northern IL and the seeing is never all that good.  On planets the TMB always offers better views of them than does the 11" SCT...and yes, it is well collimated.  I have also found that on many nights stopping down the 152 to 127mm will offer slightly better views on the planets...I did ask Thomas Back about this...he confirmed that he would often use a smaller aperture APO for the same reason. 
         
        Wally

        --- On Tue, 8/10/10, starguy <starguy@...> wrote:


        From: starguy <starguy@...>
        Subject: [tmboptical] First Light
        To: tmboptical@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, August 10, 2010, 8:56 AM


         



        After what seemed like a small eternity finally had a chance to get the TMB out - Skies weren't great but at least no clouds or rain -

        Mounted on a CGEM - My first view was Vega - Unbelievable - absolutely no color dead pinprick of light - My views that evening included some clusters (M4 - M13 etc) Planetaries(M52 -M27) and so on. I used a variety of eyepieces which included Radians, orthos, Burgess TMBs, old Research Grade 20mm and 15.5mm Erfles - Series 4000 and 5000 Meade SWAs - Pretty much the whole gamut.

        In every case I was totally enthralled with the views. Again, stars were absolute pinpricks of light, no fringing, no spikes, just points.
        The diffraction pattern was "perfect" -

        I waited for Jupiter to clear the trees and that's when I knew I had the right scope. I had never seen detail like that before. The colors were as the photo's. Detail within the belts was obvious.

        I have been doing this for over 54 years. Had a lot scopes - Currently I have the TMB, a C11 (carbon fiber tube, crayford) 8" LX90, 1970's vintage C8 and C5 - Meade AR5 -

        My scope of choice The TMB 130SS - My skies (as with probably most of us) are horribly light polluted. This scope seems to cut through that better than any of the other scopes - The images this instrument displays are as good as it gets - I cannot imagine a more "perfect" set of optics.

        The interferometer pictures of this lens are astounding - Dead parallel lines -

        I know there is no Nirvana when it comes to scopes but this is as close as I have ever seen. I look back of the scopes that are gone that were once "keepers", this one will be with me until I'm gone -

        If I were to look at a downside it would be of course aperture. It cannot resolve M13 like the C11 however the C11 does not have the purity of image on Jupiter - Which to I consider the most important - Both, that's why I have both - All the other socpes will go except my pets, the C8 and C5. There is a story behind these that has nothing to do with an evaluation.

        Rest assure fellow TMB'rs these are great scopes and hold 2nd place to no one.

        Rick H

        Same skies, older eyes

        --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@...> wrote:
        >
        > Looking for a report, when you have had a good look through it.
        >
        > Roy
        > E=mc²
        >
        > On Jul 24, 2010, at 3:41 PM, "starguy" <starguy@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Hello everyone - I just acquired a 130ss - I purchased it from a well known astronomer who had it built for him and hand finished by Thomas Back -
        > >
        > > Looking forward to seeing what this scope is capable of. All of the reviews and threads show that this is a world class refractor
        > >
        > > I have been an amateur for over 54 years, went through a lot of scopes, and am very excited about this one.
        > >
        > > Thanks for the group
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >











        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Roy Ramdeen
        Thanks for the in-depth report Rick, welcome to the TMB family. Roy E=mc² ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 10, 2010
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          Thanks for the in-depth report Rick, welcome to the TMB family.

          Roy
          E=mc²

          On Aug 10, 2010, at 7:56 AM, "starguy" <starguy@...> wrote:

          > After what seemed like a small eternity finally had a chance to get the TMB out - Skies weren't great but at least no clouds or rain -
          >
          > Mounted on a CGEM - My first view was Vega - Unbelievable - absolutely no color dead pinprick of light - My views that evening included some clusters (M4 - M13 etc) Planetaries(M52 -M27) and so on. I used a variety of eyepieces which included Radians, orthos, Burgess TMBs, old Research Grade 20mm and 15.5mm Erfles - Series 4000 and 5000 Meade SWAs - Pretty much the whole gamut.
          >
          > In every case I was totally enthralled with the views. Again, stars were absolute pinpricks of light, no fringing, no spikes, just points.
          > The diffraction pattern was "perfect" -
          >
          > I waited for Jupiter to clear the trees and that's when I knew I had the right scope. I had never seen detail like that before. The colors were as the photo's. Detail within the belts was obvious.
          >
          > I have been doing this for over 54 years. Had a lot scopes - Currently I have the TMB, a C11 (carbon fiber tube, crayford) 8" LX90, 1970's vintage C8 and C5 - Meade AR5 -
          >
          > My scope of choice The TMB 130SS - My skies (as with probably most of us) are horribly light polluted. This scope seems to cut through that better than any of the other scopes - The images this instrument displays are as good as it gets - I cannot imagine a more "perfect" set of optics.
          >
          > The interferometer pictures of this lens are astounding - Dead parallel lines -
          >
          > I know there is no Nirvana when it comes to scopes but this is as close as I have ever seen. I look back of the scopes that are gone that were once "keepers", this one will be with me until I'm gone -
          >
          > If I were to look at a downside it would be of course aperture. It cannot resolve M13 like the C11 however the C11 does not have the purity of image on Jupiter - Which to I consider the most important - Both, that's why I have both - All the other socpes will go except my pets, the C8 and C5. There is a story behind these that has nothing to do with an evaluation.
          >
          > Rest assure fellow TMB'rs these are great scopes and hold 2nd place to no one.
          >
          > Rick H
          >
          > Same skies, older eyes
          >
          > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Looking for a report, when you have had a good look through it.
          > >
          > > Roy
          > > E=mc²
          > >
          > > On Jul 24, 2010, at 3:41 PM, "starguy" <starguy@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > > Hello everyone - I just acquired a 130ss - I purchased it from a well known astronomer who had it built for him and hand finished by Thomas Back -
          > > >
          > > > Looking forward to seeing what this scope is capable of. All of the reviews and threads show that this is a world class refractor
          > > >
          > > > I have been an amateur for over 54 years, went through a lot of scopes, and am very excited about this one.
          > > >
          > > > Thanks for the group
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • stargazer
          hi Rick! thanks for the nice FL-report and congrats on this scope! a person like you with so many years of experince with several scopes - I think this really
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 21, 2010
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            hi Rick!

            thanks for the nice FL-report and congrats on this scope!
            a person like you with so many years of experince with several scopes - I think this really weights a lot when referring to an apo the way you do.
            I am in astronomy for some 25 years and i can truly confirm - refractors (with decent optics like apos) they sure beat every mirror-scope when it comes to resolution power.
            my 9" TMB apo (it is a folded apo: scher-refraktor) reveals much more details on planets and moon than a 20" LOMO cassegrain does from the local club.
            only recently I was lucky enough to gather some gorgeous details when observing at 760 power for a view moments.
            mostly I had to go with "only" 550 power.

            no mirros scope ever can match an even smaller apo.
            maybe a mak-cass could come close - but no more than close...

            have a good time with your scope(s)!

            cheers,
            dietmar
            www.stargazer-observatory.com


            --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "starguy" <starguy@...> wrote:
            >
            > After what seemed like a small eternity finally had a chance to get the TMB out - Skies weren't great but at least no clouds or rain -
            >
            > Mounted on a CGEM - My first view was Vega - Unbelievable - absolutely no color dead pinprick of light - My views that evening included some clusters (M4 - M13 etc) Planetaries(M52 -M27) and so on. I used a variety of eyepieces which included Radians, orthos, Burgess TMBs, old Research Grade 20mm and 15.5mm Erfles - Series 4000 and 5000 Meade SWAs - Pretty much the whole gamut.
            >
            > In every case I was totally enthralled with the views. Again, stars were absolute pinpricks of light, no fringing, no spikes, just points.
            > The diffraction pattern was "perfect" -
            >
            > I waited for Jupiter to clear the trees and that's when I knew I had the right scope. I had never seen detail like that before. The colors were as the photo's. Detail within the belts was obvious.
            >
            > I have been doing this for over 54 years. Had a lot scopes - Currently I have the TMB, a C11 (carbon fiber tube, crayford) 8" LX90, 1970's vintage C8 and C5 - Meade AR5 -
            >
            > My scope of choice The TMB 130SS - My skies (as with probably most of us) are horribly light polluted. This scope seems to cut through that better than any of the other scopes - The images this instrument displays are as good as it gets - I cannot imagine a more "perfect" set of optics.
            >
            > The interferometer pictures of this lens are astounding - Dead parallel lines -
            >
            > I know there is no Nirvana when it comes to scopes but this is as close as I have ever seen. I look back of the scopes that are gone that were once "keepers", this one will be with me until I'm gone -
            >
            > If I were to look at a downside it would be of course aperture. It cannot resolve M13 like the C11 however the C11 does not have the purity of image on Jupiter - Which to I consider the most important - Both, that's why I have both - All the other socpes will go except my pets, the C8 and C5. There is a story behind these that has nothing to do with an evaluation.
            >
            > Rest assure fellow TMB'rs these are great scopes and hold 2nd place to no one.
            >
            > Rick H
            >
            > Same skies, older eyes
            >
            > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Roy Ramdeen <deepsky01@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Looking for a report, when you have had a good look through it.
            > >
            > > Roy
            > > E=mc²
            > >
            > > On Jul 24, 2010, at 3:41 PM, "starguy" <starguy@> wrote:
            > >
            > > > Hello everyone - I just acquired a 130ss - I purchased it from a well known astronomer who had it built for him and hand finished by Thomas Back -
            > > >
            > > > Looking forward to seeing what this scope is capable of. All of the reviews and threads show that this is a world class refractor
            > > >
            > > > I have been an amateur for over 54 years, went through a lot of scopes, and am very excited about this one.
            > > >
            > > > Thanks for the group
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
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