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Horsehead and Flame nebula in Ha featured on Universe Today

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  • Gordon Haynes
    Hi All A couple of nights ago I was able to take a Ha image of the Horsehead and flame nebulae (B33 and NGC 2024) - my first Orion shots of the winter. One of
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 23, 2008
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      Hi All
      A couple of nights ago I was able to take a Ha image of the Horsehead
      and flame nebulae (B33 and NGC 2024) - my first Orion shots of the
      winter. One of my colleagues at work wanted a monochrome picture of this
      framed so I have made her happy as well, it is made up of 15x10 minute
      unguided subframes. I am very pleased with the result but also because
      it has been featured on Universe Today along with a very informative
      article about B33 itself
      Here is the link to the image and the article


      http://www.universetoday.com/2008/10/23/dark-knight-ahead-b33-by-gordon-\
      haynes/#more-19958
      <http://www.universetoday.com/2008/10/23/dark-knight-ahead-b33-by-gordon\
      -haynes/#more-19958>


      I hope you enjoy the image and find the article as interesting as I did
      Best wishes and clear skies
      Gordon




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Wayne G
      ... WG: Dear Gordon, Very nice shot indeed. As good and as generally informative as the writer s article was though, I found the constant references to B33
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 26, 2008
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        Gordon Haynes wrote:
        > Hi All
        > A couple of nights ago I was able to take a Ha image of the Horsehead
        > and flame nebulae (B33 and NGC 2024) - my first Orion shots of the
        > winter. One of my colleagues at work wanted a monochrome picture of this
        > framed so I have made her happy as well, it is made up of 15x10 minute
        > unguided subframes. I am very pleased with the result but also because
        > it has been featured on Universe Today

        WG: Dear Gordon,

        Very nice shot indeed. As good and as generally informative as the
        writer's article was though, I found the constant references to B33 as
        the "Dark Knight" along with three links on the page to "Dark Knight"
        (ie: Batman) merchandise, a little bit incongruous and commercial for my
        own tastes.

        That notwithstanding, I wish she would have focused more, or at least
        some on /how/ the shot was taken, where and using what telescope? You
        photo was very good, and my point in writing is really to say that I
        wished more people would focus (no pun intended) on taking (or at least
        offering) more monochrome work, as:

        1). The vast majority of color work, especially the stuff in narrowband
        these days, seems to focus on too-saturated, too-exaggerated color for
        my eye and tastes. Many color photos seem to me to be almost theatrical
        in appearance anymore, with even photos of the Moon now often being
        taken to show otherwise very subtle or normally not seen colors in stark
        blues, greens and other colors. Maybe my senses are just more subtly
        tuned, but there seems to be a trend towards "Technicolor" imagery these
        days without much sense or concern of what is really /accurate./ So long
        as it just looks good.

        2). The monochrome pictures represent, IMO, a much more realistic
        representation of what the object really /looks/ like, both in the
        eyepiece (I typically observe with scopes up to 30 inches), and in "real
        life", that is, what I believe the object would really look like if you
        were "there" in space, to actually see it first hand.

        The dramatic colors we enjoy so much in most astrophotos these days just
        isn't really there typically even in large scopes (with the exception of
        planetary nebula) or, I suspect and especially, even to an observer
        actually "out there" where one might actually see a view naked eye
        framed much like what our telescopes show.

        I much more enjoyed the subtleties, delicate shadings and nuances of
        your shot presented here, where it is more of a matter of whether there
        is light, or no light present, much like one sees in the eyepiece.

        Regards,

        WayneG
      • Terry Tuggle
        Gordon, A very nice presentation in UT; the image looked flawless! Well done, Terry http://www.geocities.com/tlt284@sbcglobal.net/terryshuntofthemonth/ _____
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 27, 2008
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          Gordon,

          A very nice presentation in UT; the image looked flawless!

          Well done,



          Terry

          http://www.geocities.com/tlt284@.../terryshuntofthemonth/

          _____

          From: tmboptical@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tmboptical@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Gordon Haynes
          Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2008 11:53 PM
          To: tmboptical@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [tmboptical] Horsehead and Flame nebula in Ha featured on Universe
          Today




          Hi All
          A couple of nights ago I was able to take a Ha image of the Horsehead
          and flame nebulae (B33 and NGC 2024) - my first Orion shots of the
          winter. One of my colleagues at work wanted a monochrome picture of this
          framed so I have made her happy as well, it is made up of 15x10 minute
          unguided subframes. I am very pleased with the result but also because
          it has been featured on Universe Today along with a very informative
          article about B33 itself
          Here is the link to the image and the article

          http://www.universe
          <http://www.universetoday.com/2008/10/23/dark-knight-ahead-b33-by-gordon-hay
          nes/#more-19958> today.com/2008/10/23/dark-knight-ahead-b33-by-gordon-\
          haynes/#more-19958
          <http://www.universe
          <http://www.universetoday.com/2008/10/23/dark-knight-ahead-b33-by-gordon-hay
          nes/#more-19958> today.com/2008/10/23/dark-knight-ahead-b33-by-gordon\
          -haynes/#more-19958>

          I hope you enjoy the image and find the article as interesting as I did
          Best wishes and clear skies
          Gordon

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Gordon Haynes
          Hi Wayne Thanks for the comments. My assumption about the reference to B33 being the Dark Knight is that it looks like the black chess piece which indeed it
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 30, 2008
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            Hi Wayne

            Thanks for the comments. My assumption about the reference to B33 being
            the "Dark Knight" is that it looks like the black chess piece which
            indeed it does. To be honest with you I didn't see any links in the
            article to Batman merchandising as you mentioned, I have had a quick
            read through the article and couldn't see them.

            I certainly agree with you that it would have been nice if Tammy had
            included information about the equipment, where it was taken, exposures,
            etc. This information is on my website Imaging The Heavens
            <http://www.imagingtheheavens.co.uk/>
            --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Wayne G <fomalhaut@...> wrote:
            >
            > Gordon Haynes wrote:
            > > Hi All
            > > A couple of nights ago I was able to take a Ha image of the
            Horsehead
            > > and flame nebulae (B33 and NGC 2024) - my first Orion shots of the
            > > winter. One of my colleagues at work wanted a monochrome picture of
            this
            > > framed so I have made her happy as well, it is made up of 15x10
            minute
            > > unguided subframes. I am very pleased with the result but also
            because
            > > it has been featured on Universe Today
            >
            > WG: Dear Gordon,
            >
            > Very nice shot indeed. As good and as generally informative as the
            > writer's article was though, I found the constant references to B33 as
            > the "Dark Knight" along with three links on the page to "Dark Knight"
            > (ie: Batman) merchandise, a little bit incongruous and commercial for
            my
            > own tastes.
            >
            > That notwithstanding, I wish she would have focused more, or at least
            > some on /how/ the shot was taken, where and using what telescope? You
            > photo was very good, and my point in writing is really to say that I
            > wished more people would focus (no pun intended) on taking (or at
            least
            > offering) more monochrome work, as:
            >
            > 1). The vast majority of color work, especially the stuff in
            narrowband
            > these days, seems to focus on too-saturated, too-exaggerated color for
            > my eye and tastes. Many color photos seem to me to be almost
            theatrical
            > in appearance anymore, with even photos of the Moon now often being
            > taken to show otherwise very subtle or normally not seen colors in
            stark
            > blues, greens and other colors. Maybe my senses are just more subtly
            > tuned, but there seems to be a trend towards "Technicolor" imagery
            these
            > days without much sense or concern of what is really /accurate./ So
            long
            > as it just looks good.
            >
            > 2). The monochrome pictures represent, IMO, a much more realistic
            > representation of what the object really /looks/ like, both in the
            > eyepiece (I typically observe with scopes up to 30 inches), and in
            "real
            > life", that is, what I believe the object would really look like if
            you
            > were "there" in space, to actually see it first hand.
            >
            > The dramatic colors we enjoy so much in most astrophotos these days
            just
            > isn't really there typically even in large scopes (with the exception
            of
            > planetary nebula) or, I suspect and especially, even to an observer
            > actually "out there" where one might actually see a view naked eye
            > framed much like what our telescopes show.
            >
            > I much more enjoyed the subtleties, delicate shadings and nuances of
            > your shot presented here, where it is more of a matter of whether
            there
            > is light, or no light present, much like one sees in the eyepiece.
            >
            > Regards,
            >
            > WayneG
            >




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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