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Observation of Palomar 12 with TMB 203 f/7!

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  • rodgerraubach
    I haven t been posting many of my observations on this group recently, but this one was too good to let pass! In early October, before the Moon again became a
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2006
      I haven't been posting many of my observations on this group
      recently, but this one was too good to let pass! In early October,
      before the Moon again became a problem for DSO observation, I was
      finally able to capture Palomar 12, a mag 11.8, Shapley-Sawyer Class
      XII globular cluster in Capricorn using my TMB 203 f/7. I am aware
      of only one other observation of this cluster using an 8" telescope,
      and that was several years ago at the Oregon Star Party in central
      (DARK skies!) Oregon.

      Finding the globular without a go-to was the first real challenge: I
      simply centered 35 Capricornii and turned off the drive for EXACTLY
      19.25 minutes (using stopwatch). The observation was NOT trivial;
      there is a tiny right triangle on mag 12-13 stars, and a line
      through the hypotenuse towards the acute vertex aims at the heart of
      the dim averted vision glow of the globular. Magnification: 142x,
      using a Pentax 10 XW. I also picked up 3 faint twinkles in the area
      of the cluster; there are about 4 stars that are mag 14.6-14.8
      within Palomar 12, and the V(tip) is listed at 14.6.

      Who says that APOs aren't great deep sky telescopes?

      Rodger Raubach Ph.D
      Canyon Vista Ranch Observatory (Roll-Off Roof)
      Douglas (Converse County), WY.
    • dietmar hager
      hi Rodger, You`re absolutels right! TMB Apos are wonderful deepskymachines! not only photografically but visually. I have observed some minor planetary
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 2, 2006
        hi Rodger,

        You`re absolutels right!
        TMB Apos are wonderful deepskymachines!
        not only photografically but visually.
        I have observed some minor planetary nebuilae like

        NGC 6826: the "blinking planetary" is quite a match for the 9" tmb
        apo. It holds only some 0,42` so in order to see details You need
        power! Using the bino with corrector +0,25 I loved to observe this
        wonderful object with cute details under 500 power and up to 730
        power.

        NGC 7009: Saturn-nebula reveald under 500 power to me, why it is
        called like this. It is more compact but still one can see with 500
        power that it is ocal and that there are dark region symmetrical to
        the "equator" of the object.

        NGC 7662: only 12 arc seconds small this one was the hardest object
        of this eveneing. though it is very bright one needs at least 500
        power but better 730 power to see details within. those details are
        only very hard to recognize and 9" is too little for this object to
        be honest.

        M57:
        my 9er revealed the different brightnesses within the ring perfectly
        contrasted ! and this without any deepsky-filter like UHC,...
        I only used the same bino adapter as described above.

        M27:
        7 fronstars werde visible. the "ears" of the nebula just "there".

        I love my 9er TMB Apo and I know everyone else who`s a lucky owner of
        a scope like this feely exactly the same!

        best greets
        Dietmar

        --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "rodgerraubach"
        <rodgerraubach@...> wrote:
        >
        > I haven't been posting many of my observations on this group
        > recently, but this one was too good to let pass! In early October,
        > before the Moon again became a problem for DSO observation, I was
        > finally able to capture Palomar 12, a mag 11.8, Shapley-Sawyer
        Class
        > XII globular cluster in Capricorn using my TMB 203 f/7. I am aware
        > of only one other observation of this cluster using an 8"
        telescope,
        > and that was several years ago at the Oregon Star Party in central
        > (DARK skies!) Oregon.
        >
        > Finding the globular without a go-to was the first real challenge:
        I
        > simply centered 35 Capricornii and turned off the drive for
        EXACTLY
        > 19.25 minutes (using stopwatch). The observation was NOT trivial;
        > there is a tiny right triangle on mag 12-13 stars, and a line
        > through the hypotenuse towards the acute vertex aims at the heart
        of
        > the dim averted vision glow of the globular. Magnification: 142x,
        > using a Pentax 10 XW. I also picked up 3 faint twinkles in the area
        > of the cluster; there are about 4 stars that are mag 14.6-14.8
        > within Palomar 12, and the V(tip) is listed at 14.6.
        >
        > Who says that APOs aren't great deep sky telescopes?
        >
        > Rodger Raubach Ph.D
        > Canyon Vista Ranch Observatory (Roll-Off Roof)
        > Douglas (Converse County), WY.
        >
      • Louis Marchesi
        ... That s excellent! Isn t it satisfying to turn a tiny eye to the sky and see challenging objects such as Pal 12? ... Are you aware of anyone using a
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 2, 2006
          --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "rodgerraubach" <rodgerraubach@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I haven't been posting many of my observations on this group
          > recently, but this one was too good to let pass! In early October,
          > before the Moon again became a problem for DSO observation, I was
          > finally able to capture Palomar 12, a mag 11.8, Shapley-Sawyer Class
          > XII globular cluster in Capricorn using my TMB 203 f/7.

          That's excellent! Isn't it satisfying to turn a "tiny" eye to the sky
          and see challenging objects such as Pal 12?

          > I am aware
          > of only one other observation of this cluster using an 8" telescope,
          > and that was several years ago at the Oregon Star Party in central
          > (DARK skies!) Oregon.

          Are you aware of anyone using a smaller aperture? I'm going to try it
          with my TMB152 as soon as Luna allows.

          > Finding the globular without a go-to was the first real challenge:
          I'm going to limit the challenge to the observation and "cheat" with
          GOTO ;-)

          > Who says that APOs aren't great deep sky telescopes?

          Probably only those who haven't used one for deep sky. Sure, if I'm
          set up next to my observing buddy with the 20-inch Obsession I'm going
          to take a look, but even a small, excellent optic is nothing to disregard.

          Regards,
          Louis Marchesi
          New London Twp, PA
        • Wayne G
          ... WG: Dietmar, have to mention that the local clubs 24 Ritchey-C didn t show that much detail--- WITH an OIII filter! And it was one of their best
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 2, 2006
            dietmar hager wrote:
            > M57:
            > my 9er revealed the different brightnesses within the ring perfectly
            > contrasted ! and this without any deepsky-filter like UHC,...
            >

            WG: Dietmar, have to mention that the local clubs 24" Ritchey-C didn't
            show that much detail--- WITH an OIII filter! And it was one of their
            best nights.

            WayneG
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