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WSP 2006

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  • Louis Marchesi
    I m still recovering from the 1300-mile drive from the Keys to home here in PA, but I thought I d post some highlights of my first Winter Star Party. Thomas,
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 27, 2006
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      I'm still recovering from the 1300-mile drive from the Keys to home
      here in PA, but I thought I'd post some highlights of my first Winter
      Star Party.

      Thomas, dual "thanks" are in order. The TMB152 performed
      magnificently. And, when I needed a portable scope to see around an
      obstacle, my WO Zenithstar Fluorite Doublet 80 stepped up to the plate
      very nicely. I wish you'd been able to attend.

      The WSP was incredible. Sunny, warm, highs in the upper 70s to low
      80s, lows in the upper 60s. The skies were clear most of the time with
      decent transparency and good to excellent seeing. We got more EP time
      in five days that I can log in months up here.

      And so without further adieu ...

      The Top Ten most memorable views I saw at the 2006 Winter Star Party:

      10. Alpha Centauri and companion pulsing with the colors of the
      rainbow, hovering 1-1/2 degrees above the horizon
      9. NGC 2477 and the glory of the Puppis Milky Way
      8. Six stars in the Trapezium while wearing a T-shirt and shorts
      7. Centaurus A
      6. Omega Centauri
      5. The Jewel Box
      4. Eta Carinae
      3. NGC 3532
      2. Sirius B (I used the TMB/BO 4mm for this feat)

      ... and the number one reason to travel 1300 miles to the WSP ...

      1. The Southern Cross shining brightly over the Atlantic Ocean

      Honestly, it was *hard* to whittle the list to ten and ordering them
      even harder. The view of Jupiter rising and shimmering on the ocean,
      Saturn, and the crescent Moon and Venus ... wow. It was an absolutely
      fabulous time.

      Regards,
      Louis Marchesi
      New London Twp, PA
    • Tube Tim
      ... That s a long haul; welcome home. ... I can do that one here (San Diego) ... With the 152? That s huge! Congrats. Thanks for the report. Tim
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 27, 2006
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        >--- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Louis Marchesi" <lmarchesi@...
        > wrote:
        >
        > I'm still recovering from the 1300-mile drive from the Keys to home
        > here in PA, but I thought I'd post some highlights of my first
        > Winter Star Party.
        >

        That's a long haul; welcome home.


        > The Top Ten most memorable views I saw at the 2006 Winter Star
        > Party:
        >

        > 8. Six stars in the Trapezium while wearing a T-shirt and shorts

        I can do that one here (San Diego)


        > 2. Sirius B (I used the TMB/BO 4mm for this feat)

        With the 152? That's huge! Congrats.


        Thanks for the report.


        Tim


        >
        > ... and the number one reason to travel 1300 miles to the WSP ...
        >
        > 1. The Southern Cross shining brightly over the Atlantic Ocean
        >
        > Honestly, it was *hard* to whittle the list to ten and ordering them
        > even harder. The view of Jupiter rising and shimmering on the ocean,
        > Saturn, and the crescent Moon and Venus ... wow. It was an absolutely
        > fabulous time.
        >
        > Regards,
        > Louis Marchesi
        > New London Twp, PA
        >
      • Robert Anderson
        Great Report Louis. Man, just think, the Floridians get to enjoy it year round and your now enjoying temps that are 70 degrees less back home. Talk about shock
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 27, 2006
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          Great Report Louis.

          Man, just think, the Floridians get to enjoy it year round and your
          now enjoying temps that are 70 degrees less back home. Talk about
          shock to the system - both ways!

          All the best and thanks for sharing.

          Bob

          --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Louis Marchesi" <lmarchesi@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I'm still recovering from the 1300-mile drive from the Keys to home
          > here in PA, but I thought I'd post some highlights of my first
          Winter
          > Star Party.
          >
          > Thomas, dual "thanks" are in order. The TMB152 performed
          > magnificently. And, when I needed a portable scope to see around an
          > obstacle, my WO Zenithstar Fluorite Doublet 80 stepped up to the
          plate
          > very nicely. I wish you'd been able to attend.
          >
          > The WSP was incredible. Sunny, warm, highs in the upper 70s to low
          > 80s, lows in the upper 60s. The skies were clear most of the time
          with
          > decent transparency and good to excellent seeing. We got more EP
          time
          > in five days that I can log in months up here.
          >
          > And so without further adieu ...
          >
          > The Top Ten most memorable views I saw at the 2006 Winter Star
          Party:
          >
          > 10. Alpha Centauri and companion pulsing with the colors of the
          > rainbow, hovering 1-1/2 degrees above the horizon
          > 9. NGC 2477 and the glory of the Puppis Milky Way
          > 8. Six stars in the Trapezium while wearing a T-shirt and shorts
          > 7. Centaurus A
          > 6. Omega Centauri
          > 5. The Jewel Box
          > 4. Eta Carinae
          > 3. NGC 3532
          > 2. Sirius B (I used the TMB/BO 4mm for this feat)
          >
          > ... and the number one reason to travel 1300 miles to the WSP ...
          >
          > 1. The Southern Cross shining brightly over the Atlantic Ocean
          >
          > Honestly, it was *hard* to whittle the list to ten and ordering them
          > even harder. The view of Jupiter rising and shimmering on the ocean,
          > Saturn, and the crescent Moon and Venus ... wow. It was an
          absolutely
          > fabulous time.
          >
          > Regards,
          > Louis Marchesi
          > New London Twp, PA
          >
        • Eric Baumgartner
          Hi, Louis: Great report! Someday, I¹ll get to WSP. Looking at winter constellations in tee shirt and shorts must be so ³cool² (figuratively speaking, of
          Message 4 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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            Hi, Louis:

            Great report! Someday, I¹ll get to WSP. Looking at winter constellations in
            tee shirt and shorts must be so ³cool² (figuratively speaking, of course).
            Last time I was out, it was 15 degrees with a wind chill in the single
            digits.

            I¹m confused about one thing: I thought that Thomas was at WSP?

            Eric Baumgartner
            Redding, CT USA





            On 02/27/06 9:18 PM, "Louis Marchesi" <lmarchesi@...> wrote:

            > I'm still recovering from the 1300-mile drive from the Keys to home
            > here in PA, but I thought I'd post some highlights of my first Winter
            > Star Party.
            >
            > Thomas, dual "thanks" are in order. The TMB152 performed
            > magnificently. And, when I needed a portable scope to see around an
            > obstacle, my WO Zenithstar Fluorite Doublet 80 stepped up to the plate
            > very nicely. I wish you'd been able to attend.
            >
            > The WSP was incredible. Sunny, warm, highs in the upper 70s to low
            > 80s, lows in the upper 60s. The skies were clear most of the time with
            > decent transparency and good to excellent seeing. We got more EP time
            > in five days that I can log in months up here.
            >
            > And so without further adieu ...
            >
            > The Top Ten most memorable views I saw at the 2006 Winter Star Party:
            >
            > 10. Alpha Centauri and companion pulsing with the colors of the
            > rainbow, hovering 1-1/2 degrees above the horizon
            > 9. NGC 2477 and the glory of the Puppis Milky Way
            > 8. Six stars in the Trapezium while wearing a T-shirt and shorts
            > 7. Centaurus A
            > 6. Omega Centauri
            > 5. The Jewel Box
            > 4. Eta Carinae
            > 3. NGC 3532
            > 2. Sirius B (I used the TMB/BO 4mm for this feat)
            >
            > ... and the number one reason to travel 1300 miles to the WSP ...
            >
            > 1. The Southern Cross shining brightly over the Atlantic Ocean
            >
            > Honestly, it was *hard* to whittle the list to ten and ordering them
            > even harder. The view of Jupiter rising and shimmering on the ocean,
            > Saturn, and the crescent Moon and Venus ... wow. It was an absolutely
            > fabulous time.
            >
            > Regards,
            > Louis Marchesi
            > New London Twp, PA



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • tmboptical
            ... constellations in ... course). ... single ... Hi Louis, Eric and everyone from the TMB group that was at the WSP, This is very long, so you may fall asleep
            Message 5 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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              --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Eric Baumgartner <malkasten@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Hi, Louis:
              >
              > Great report! Someday, I¹ll get to WSP. Looking at winter
              constellations in
              > tee shirt and shorts must be so ³cool² (figuratively speaking, of
              course).
              > Last time I was out, it was 15 degrees with a wind chill in the
              single
              > digits.
              >
              > I¹m confused about one thing: I thought that Thomas was at WSP?
              >
              > Eric Baumgartner
              > Redding, CT USA

              Hi Louis, Eric and everyone from the TMB group that was at the WSP,

              This is very long, so you may fall asleep if you read the whole
              thing -- just a warning.

              Oh yes, I was going to the Winter Star Party, but what happened,
              was a nightmare.

              I was really looking forward to going to the WSP this year, like
              every year, but this one even more than ever. The weather has
              been terrible (snow, wind, ice and clouds), and it would have been
              great to get away from that all, and to see my friends in my summer
              clothes, at 80 degrees. Plus, from what I hear, the seeing on at
              least 3 to 4 nights, was the best in many years.

              The problems started with my car. I first planned on driving down,
              as I usually do, but a week before the star party, I had a blow
              out on my Michelin MX-4 16" tires. I'm telling you the size of
              the tire, because it was the main reason why I could not drive
              down.

              My tires only have 28,000 miles on them, and all the tires had
              good tread left. I was coming back from my business P.O. Box,
              and this was pure luck, but still very bad news. The driver's
              front side tire had a blow out, just as I was driving into my
              driveway! I was able to just roll the car up to the garage door,
              and turn the engine off. The good luck part was I took the freeway,
              and if this happened at 70 miles an hour on I-480, with all the
              trucks and high volume traffic, I could have got into a serious
              accident. I Googled Michelin, and the MX-4 was a tire that had
              a chronic sidewall problems. They pulled them off the market,
              and after reading that, I was mighty angry about $120.00 tires
              that can't make it to 30,000 miles.

              I called the Michelin headquarters, and they said that my tires
              still had a warranty, but I would have to prove that they were
              put on the car, as original equipment tires. This is how they
              get you, and almost never honor their warranty's. How can you
              prove that? Well, I called my dealer, and they said that they
              had no way of proving that to me, or to Michelin. But the head
              of the service department said there was only one way. He asked
              "Did you keep your window sticker?" And I said I sure did. Well
              he said, you have all the proof you need to get the warranty. He
              also said that almost no one keeps the window sticker, that shows
              every item, price and group upgrade you have on the car. In my
              case, the 16" tires were an upgrade, and the guy at Michelin
              said that my car, according to his reference book, could not
              have come with 16" tires, so no warranty. He conveniently forgot
              to tell me that the window sticker would prove that I had the
              factory put them on. So, keep your window stickers! It could save
              you hundreds, if not thousands of dollars.

              There is a Michelin warranty tire center not more than 2 miles
              from my house. The next closest, was at least 20 miles away. Lucky
              again, I guess. So, I took the tire off, and put the spare on, and
              drove it down to the shop. Then the bad news hit, the replacement
              for the MX-4 in the 16" size was not in stock anywhere in greater
              Cleveland area, because that size was not often put on any vehicle,
              and they would have to special order it. I told the guy at Conrad's
              that I needed the car ready by Tuesday at the very latest, but he
              said no way, it would be Thursday, at best.

              That shot any chance of driving down, so I left the car with them
              and said just go ahead, and do your best to get the new tires
              under warranty, which they did (good luck, again, I suppose). My
              neck has not been well lately, so this may have been a blessing in
              disguise, going through 7 states, and 3,500 miles of total driving.
              At the least, my neck would have been in greater pain for sure, or
              maybe worse. I thought about that a lot after all this, and gave
              up on the idea of renting a car, to get down there.

              So, flying down was my only option. Bill and Tammy Burgess said
              no problem Thomas, that they would find a ticket for me. Tammy
              is very good at fishing for the best flights. Tom Davis and his
              wife Kimberly, also tried to find a flight, but had no luck
              either (a big thanks to them all for helping me). But by the time
              I tried to get a ticket, the only flight left (and I spent two
              days myself, looking for any possible flight), was one with three
              connecting flights, and two stops in between, and the closest I
              could get to the star party was Miami, with a 6:00am flight (I
              go to bed around 4:00am, working two shifts to keep up with all
              my work with TMB Optical) and I would never go to bed that day.

              With a total of 11 hours of flight and layover time, and another
              2 or more hours of driving to get to the motel, that I already
              had reservations at, in the Marathon Key, that would be 13+ hours,
              and that for sure would kill my neck.

              What was a $500.00 flight, with just a total of 5 hours to Key West,
              turned into a $1350.00 flight, with the motel at just over $450.00,
              and a rental Mini-Van at $300.00 (I was bringing down a few scopes, a
              mount, and my new eyepieces), plus cash for food and the money you
              always end up spending at a star party, that would have added up
              to almost $2,500.00, for just three nights, out of the 7 days at
              the Winter Star Party. Add that I just got a big order in from
              Markus on Monday, considerations of my health, and that much money,
              I had to throw in the towel. Yes, $2,500.00 is a lot of money for
              me, too much to spend on a star party, unless you plan on getting
              it back, by setting up a booth, and selling your products, to pay
              for the trip.

              All I can say is that the whole ordeal was depressing, and that I
              am sorry I could not be down there with my friends and customers.
              You can be sure, next year, I will have my flight, ticket, motel,
              new products and a rental van all ready, one month before the star
              party.

              I'll see you all next year, hell or high water.

              Thomas Back

              P.S. That was a great report on the WSP Louis. I would have loved
              to look through your TMB 152mm, with perfect seeing. Someone told
              me you had a chance to use the new TMB 40mm SW Paragon eyepiece.
              What did you think about it? Thanks.


              > On 02/27/06 9:18 PM, "Louis Marchesi" <lmarchesi@...> wrote:
              >
              > > I'm still recovering from the 1300-mile drive from the Keys to
              home
              > > here in PA, but I thought I'd post some highlights of my first
              Winter
              > > Star Party.
              > >
              > > Thomas, dual "thanks" are in order. The TMB152 performed
              > > magnificently. And, when I needed a portable scope to see around
              an
              > > obstacle, my WO Zenithstar Fluorite Doublet 80 stepped up to the
              plate
              > > very nicely. I wish you'd been able to attend.
              > >
              > > The WSP was incredible. Sunny, warm, highs in the upper 70s to low
              > > 80s, lows in the upper 60s. The skies were clear most of the time
              with
              > > decent transparency and good to excellent seeing. We got more EP
              time
              > > in five days that I can log in months up here.
              > >
              > > And so without further adieu ...
              > >
              > > The Top Ten most memorable views I saw at the 2006 Winter Star
              Party:
              > >
              > > 10. Alpha Centauri and companion pulsing with the colors of the
              > > rainbow, hovering 1-1/2 degrees above the horizon
              > > 9. NGC 2477 and the glory of the Puppis Milky Way
              > > 8. Six stars in the Trapezium while wearing a T-shirt and shorts
              > > 7. Centaurus A
              > > 6. Omega Centauri
              > > 5. The Jewel Box
              > > 4. Eta Carinae
              > > 3. NGC 3532
              > > 2. Sirius B (I used the TMB/BO 4mm for this feat)
              > >
              > > ... and the number one reason to travel 1300 miles to the WSP ...
              > >
              > > 1. The Southern Cross shining brightly over the Atlantic Ocean
              > >
              > > Honestly, it was *hard* to whittle the list to ten and ordering
              them
              > > even harder. The view of Jupiter rising and shimmering on the
              ocean,
              > > Saturn, and the crescent Moon and Venus ... wow. It was an
              absolutely
              > > fabulous time.
              > >
              > > Regards,
              > > Louis Marchesi
              > > New London Twp, PA
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • David
              Thomas, I was similarly challenged - 2 days before my flight after packing some heavy items my low back gave up for the first time in my life. I was thinking
              Message 6 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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                Thomas,

                I was similarly challenged - 2 days before my flight after packing
                some heavy items my low back gave up for the first time in my life. I
                was thinking on using the flight insurance but then some Advil and
                massage helped.
                Then on Sunday I was too late to check-in the luggage at the airport
                and was sent (after it looked for a while like Tue arrival) on Sun
                midnight flight across the country to NC and to Miami. I got quickly
                out of the city, delayed 12 hours, (oh well, no place on the beach
                berm) and when doing the last shopping in Key Largo I locked the keys
                in the rental van :-( Another hour lost.
                The scope I sent for Mon delivery got lost by DHL until Wednesday and
                to all the trouble, a battery shortcut killed the electronics on my
                scope after just 30 min observing.

                Imagine me hand pushing the Dob observing Saturn at 450x in TMB mono
                on right side of the binoviewer and using the left eye with a 25mm EP
                on the left side for rough guidance. I really wanted to try the
                Paragon but BB's presence was rather inconspicuous.

                Markus gave one of those 80/480 APOs as a door prize and it was
                successfully auctioned for the benefit of the camp upgrade.

                Still, it was a beautiful week and there are photos already appearing
                on people's websites.


                David
              • Louis Marchesi
                ... Well, then, star party at your place :-) ... Yes, with the 152. I saw the companion and then had two others confirm what I was seeing. They aren t double
                Message 7 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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                  --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Tube Tim" <potentate@...> wrote:

                  > > 8. Six stars in the Trapezium while wearing a T-shirt and shorts
                  >
                  > I can do that one here (San Diego)

                  Well, then, star party at your place :-)

                  >
                  > > 2. Sirius B (I used the TMB/BO 4mm for this feat)
                  >
                  > With the 152? That's huge! Congrats.

                  Yes, with the 152. I saw the companion and then had two others confirm
                  what I was seeing. They aren't double star enthusiasts, but I, for
                  one, was tickled pink.

                  Regards,
                  Louis Marchesi
                • Louis Marchesi
                  ... constellations in ... course). ... Eric, Not only do you get to see the winter constellations, but Puppis, Carina, Vela, Centaurus, and Crux are visible.
                  Message 8 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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                    --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, Eric Baumgartner <malkasten@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi, Louis:
                    >
                    > Great report! Someday, I¹ll get to WSP. Looking at winter
                    constellations in
                    > tee shirt and shorts must be so ³cool² (figuratively speaking, of
                    course).
                    > Last time I was out, it was 15 degrees with a wind chill in the single
                    > digits.

                    Eric,

                    Not only do you get to see the winter constellations, but Puppis,
                    Carina, Vela, Centaurus, and Crux are visible.

                    We left PA with the temps in the single digits F and arrived in FL
                    around 3am with the temps in the upper 60s!

                    I can't wait till next year!

                    Regards,
                    Louis Marchesi
                  • Louis Marchesi
                    ... Well, hopefully we ll both be at WSP 2007. Are you planning on being at BFSP this year? About the 40mm ... it is amazing how lightweight it is, especially
                    Message 9 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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                      --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "tmboptical" <TMBoptical@...> wrote:

                      > P.S. That was a great report on the WSP Louis. I would have loved
                      > to look through your TMB 152mm, with perfect seeing. Someone told
                      > me you had a chance to use the new TMB 40mm SW Paragon eyepiece.
                      > What did you think about it? Thanks.

                      Well, hopefully we'll both be at WSP 2007. Are you planning on being
                      at BFSP this year?

                      About the 40mm ... it is amazing how lightweight it is, especially
                      compared to my 41mm Panoptic. I didn't get to see the EP in the
                      daylight, but my observing buddies did and they were amazed at how
                      "black" and invisible the coatings were. The fit and finish looked
                      absolutely first rate (in red light).

                      I wish I had more time to do a more critical evaluation but the EP
                      looks excellent and is a good buy at TV prices, but for the price Bill
                      mentioned (249 IIRC?) -- wow. M42 looked awesome in my scope through
                      that EP and the EP was excellent even in my friend's 20-inch f/5
                      Obsession. You're going to have a real winner there for sure.

                      Regards,
                      Louis Marchesi
                    • Tube Tim
                      ... You got an open invitation. ... Amazing! Congratulations on this one. I am still trying. Tim
                      Message 10 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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                        >--- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Louis Marchesi" <lmarchesi@...
                        > wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Well, then, star party at your place :-)

                        You got an open invitation.


                        > Yes, with the 152. I saw the companion and then had two others confirm
                        > what I was seeing. They aren't double star enthusiasts, but I, for
                        > one, was tickled pink.

                        Amazing! Congratulations on this one. I am still trying.

                        Tim

                        > Regards,
                        > Louis Marchesi
                      • tmboptical
                        ... Bill ... Hi Louis, 2007 WSP for sure. I will be there, and I hope you can bring your TMB 152 again -- I m sure you had a lot of people enjoying the views.
                        Message 11 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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                          --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Louis Marchesi" <lmarchesi@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "tmboptical" <TMBoptical@> wrote:
                          >
                          > > P.S. That was a great report on the WSP Louis. I would have loved
                          > > to look through your TMB 152mm, with perfect seeing. Someone told
                          > > me you had a chance to use the new TMB 40mm SW Paragon eyepiece.
                          > > What did you think about it? Thanks.
                          >
                          > Well, hopefully we'll both be at WSP 2007. Are you planning on being
                          > at BFSP this year?
                          >
                          > About the 40mm ... it is amazing how lightweight it is, especially
                          > compared to my 41mm Panoptic. I didn't get to see the EP in the
                          > daylight, but my observing buddies did and they were amazed at how
                          > "black" and invisible the coatings were. The fit and finish looked
                          > absolutely first rate (in red light).
                          >
                          > I wish I had more time to do a more critical evaluation but the EP
                          > looks excellent and is a good buy at TV prices, but for the price
                          Bill
                          > mentioned (249 IIRC?) -- wow. M42 looked awesome in my scope through
                          > that EP and the EP was excellent even in my friend's 20-inch f/5
                          > Obsession. You're going to have a real winner there for sure.
                          >
                          > Regards,
                          > Louis Marchesi

                          Hi Louis,

                          2007 WSP for sure. I will be there, and I hope you can bring your
                          TMB 152 again -- I'm sure you had a lot of people enjoying the
                          views.

                          I never miss the BFSP, and I mean never. I'll see you there! Only
                          6 months to go.

                          I'm glad you got a chance to use the 40mm Paragon, and view M42
                          with it. Thanks for the nice comments on my new eyepiece. On this
                          one, I used the best glass types, design and coatings. I think a
                          lot of people will be surprised when they get a chance to test
                          it, and I am going to guess that some people will say there are
                          no coatings on the eyepiece at first, because the coatings are so
                          dark, they are hard to see. Other 40mm eyepieces use distortion to
                          control astigmatism, but not the Paragon. It has a flat field, and
                          astigmatism control. Now, with a fast f/4 Newtonian, you will see
                          coma, but that is the mirror, not the eyepiece. This gives a true
                          wider field, as some eyepieces that have magnification distortion,
                          may have an AFOV of 68 degrees, but the magnification changes as
                          you get closer to the edge of the field, and the true field size
                          is smaller.

                          Best Regards,

                          Thomas Back
                        • dennis
                          Hey Tom: I m not sure I saw the specs for the 40 paragon but what is the eye relief on it? ... From: tmboptical To: tmboptical@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday,
                          Message 12 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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                            Hey Tom:

                            I'm not sure I saw the specs for the 40 paragon but what is the eye relief
                            on it?


                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: tmboptical
                            To: tmboptical@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 2:22 AM
                            Subject: [tmboptical] Re: WSP 2006, and Why TMB Wasn't There (very long)


                            --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Louis Marchesi" <lmarchesi@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "tmboptical" <TMBoptical@> wrote:
                            >
                            > > P.S. That was a great report on the WSP Louis. I would have loved
                            > > to look through your TMB 152mm, with perfect seeing. Someone told
                            > > me you had a chance to use the new TMB 40mm SW Paragon eyepiece.
                            > > What did you think about it? Thanks.
                            >
                            > Well, hopefully we'll both be at WSP 2007. Are you planning on being
                            > at BFSP this year?
                            >
                            > About the 40mm ... it is amazing how lightweight it is, especially
                            > compared to my 41mm Panoptic. I didn't get to see the EP in the
                            > daylight, but my observing buddies did and they were amazed at how
                            > "black" and invisible the coatings were. The fit and finish looked
                            > absolutely first rate (in red light).
                            >
                            > I wish I had more time to do a more critical evaluation but the EP
                            > looks excellent and is a good buy at TV prices, but for the price
                            Bill
                            > mentioned (249 IIRC?) -- wow. M42 looked awesome in my scope through
                            > that EP and the EP was excellent even in my friend's 20-inch f/5
                            > Obsession. You're going to have a real winner there for sure.
                            >
                            > Regards,
                            > Louis Marchesi

                            Hi Louis,

                            2007 WSP for sure. I will be there, and I hope you can bring your
                            TMB 152 again -- I'm sure you had a lot of people enjoying the
                            views.

                            I never miss the BFSP, and I mean never. I'll see you there! Only
                            6 months to go.

                            I'm glad you got a chance to use the 40mm Paragon, and view M42
                            with it. Thanks for the nice comments on my new eyepiece. On this
                            one, I used the best glass types, design and coatings. I think a
                            lot of people will be surprised when they get a chance to test
                            it, and I am going to guess that some people will say there are
                            no coatings on the eyepiece at first, because the coatings are so
                            dark, they are hard to see. Other 40mm eyepieces use distortion to
                            control astigmatism, but not the Paragon. It has a flat field, and
                            astigmatism control. Now, with a fast f/4 Newtonian, you will see
                            coma, but that is the mirror, not the eyepiece. This gives a true
                            wider field, as some eyepieces that have magnification distortion,
                            may have an AFOV of 68 degrees, but the magnification changes as
                            you get closer to the edge of the field, and the true field size
                            is smaller.

                            Best Regards,

                            Thomas Back





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                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • tmboptical
                            ... confirm ... Hi Tim, Seeing, seeing Tim. They had 10 seeing down there, and it would be a piece of cake with your 9 , if you were there. Add that the
                            Message 13 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Tube Tim" <potentate@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > >--- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Louis Marchesi" <lmarchesi@
                              > > wrote:
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Well, then, star party at your place :-)
                              >
                              > You got an open invitation.
                              >
                              >
                              > > Yes, with the 152. I saw the companion and then had two others
                              confirm
                              > > what I was seeing. They aren't double star enthusiasts, but I, for
                              > > one, was tickled pink.
                              >
                              > Amazing! Congratulations on this one. I am still trying.
                              >
                              > Tim

                              Hi Tim,

                              Seeing, seeing Tim. They had "10" seeing down there, and it would
                              be a piece of cake with your 9", if you were there. Add that the
                              latitude is ~ 25 north, and that helps too.

                              Thomas
                            • Donald Rosenfield
                              Hi Thomas, Then why was the discovery of Sirius B made with the 18½ Clark refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Evanston? Donald
                              Message 14 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hi Thomas,

                                Then why was the discovery of Sirius B made with the 18½" Clark refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Evanston?

                                Donald


                                <<Hi Tim,

                                Seeing, seeing Tim. They had "10" seeing down there, and it would
                                be a piece of cake with your 9", if you were there. Add that the
                                latitude is ~ 25 north, and that helps too.

                                Thomas


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Louis Marchesi
                                ... refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Evanston? ... Well, I m not Thomas, but ... AC had a 470mm to my puny 152. I would think that even though a TMB
                                Message 15 of 18 , Mar 1, 2006
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  --- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Donald Rosenfield" <cardar@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Hi Thomas,
                                  >
                                  > Then why was the discovery of Sirius B made with the 18½" Clark
                                  refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Evanston?
                                  >
                                  > Donald

                                  Well, I'm not Thomas, but ...

                                  AC had a 470mm to my "puny" 152. I would think that even though a TMB
                                  would "wipe the floor" with an AC ;-))), the larger aperture overcame
                                  the latitude. The current separation of Sirius A and B is 7".26;
                                  perhaps it was at its widest when AC made his serendipitous observation.

                                  Regards,
                                  Louis Marchesi
                                • Tube Tim
                                  ... but.. but Donald, the Dogan tribe in Africa knew of Sirus B long before Mr. Clark came along. Tim ... refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Evanston?
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Mar 1, 2006
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    >--- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Donald Rosenfield" <cardar@...
                                    > wrote:

                                    but.. but Donald, the Dogan tribe in Africa knew of Sirus B long
                                    before Mr. Clark came along.


                                    Tim

                                    >
                                    > Hi Thomas,
                                    >
                                    > Then why was the discovery of Sirius B made with the 18½" Clark
                                    refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Evanston?
                                    >
                                    > Donald
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > <<Hi Tim,
                                    >
                                    > Seeing, seeing Tim. They had "10" seeing down there, and it would
                                    > be a piece of cake with your 9", if you were there. Add that the
                                    > latitude is ~ 25 north, and that helps too.
                                    >
                                    > Thomas
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    >
                                  • Donald Rosenfield
                                    ... refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Evanston? ... Well, I m not Thomas, but ... AC had a 470mm to my puny 152. I would think that even though a TMB
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Mar 1, 2006
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      > Hi Thomas,
                                      >
                                      > Then why was the discovery of Sirius B made with the 18½" Clark
                                      refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Evanston?
                                      >
                                      > Donald

                                      Well, I'm not Thomas, but ...

                                      AC had a 470mm to my "puny" 152. I would think that even though a TMB
                                      would "wipe the floor" with an AC ;-))), the larger aperture overcame
                                      the latitude. The current separation of Sirius A and B is 7".26;
                                      perhaps it was at its widest when AC made his serendipitous observation.

                                      Regards,
                                      Louis Marchesi
                                      ******************
                                      Thanks, Louis. That makes sense.

                                      I still think in wonder that I had three year's use of an 8" Clark doublet and when it arrives here I'll have the rest of my life use of an 8" BO/TMB fluorite Petzval APO. Of course, when I read stuff like youse guys wrote about what you could see from Key West, I think back that the Clark was on the Tropic of Capricorn so all those Southern Constellations were visible every clear night, depending only on the season.

                                      Regards,
                                      Donald Rosenfield









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                                      Tmb Astronomy software Astronomy magazine




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                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Donald Rosenfield
                                      Hm, Tim, is that Robert Dogan of the High Point Scientific tribe? I guess not as your Dogans came before Mr. Clark. Are you aware, Tim, that you were named
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Mar 2, 2006
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                                        Hm, Tim, is that Robert Dogan of the High Point Scientific tribe? I guess not as your Dogans came before Mr. Clark. Are you aware, Tim, that you were named after the Dogans? And that Thomas was named after Thomas Edison? I was named after Henry Ford.

                                        Are you getting all this, Tim? Henry Ford was born and named and years later I was born and named; therefore, I was named after him. So you can see that you are named after Tycho Brahe. . . .

                                        Donald

                                        <<but.. but Donald, the Dogan tribe in Africa knew of Sirus B long
                                        before Mr. Clark came along.


                                        Tim

                                        >
                                        > Hi Thomas,
                                        >
                                        > Then why was the discovery of Sirius B made with the 18½" Clark
                                        refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Evanston?
                                        >
                                        > Donald


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