Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Deimos in the 175/8

Expand Messages
  • Mike C
    I ve been watching Mars.. again.. At 396x in a pair of 6mm monocentric eyepieces, I can easily lock on to Deimos and hold it in averted vision, with Mars
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      I've been watching Mars.. again.. At 396x in a pair of 6mm monocentric
      eyepieces, I can easily lock on to Deimos and hold it in averted vision,
      with Mars sitting there lighting up the eyepiece a good bit. If I shift
      Mars just out of the eyepiece, Deimos becomes dead obvious. I can almost
      grab it with direct vision then, but not quite.

      The show changes fast !

      While watching Sinus Sabaeus crawl across Mars, I just knew it had to be a
      martian moon that kept popping in and out of sight off the port bow. In
      order to determine what it was, I noted it's distance from Mars in
      Mars-widths, and what angle it was at relative to Syrtis Major and Sinus
      Sabaeus. Came inside, ID'd it as Deimos using Skytools-2, and then warmed up
      for half an hour. Deimos has obviously moved a bit on return.

      You can see it's pretty well off of Mars as I've seen it tonight (white dot
      to the right:)
      http://makeashorterlink.com/?T2FF1241C

      Phobos really burns up the tires. Its crossing Mars right now, which I think
      takes a bit under an hour. I'm planning on defeating it as well tonight,
      about 120 minutes from now. Unless it's in the birch trees.

      Mike
    • Mike C
      ... OK, so Phobos wins for tonight. Seeing has degraded a bit, and after a couple hours sitting out at 10 degrees F, aluminum parts are starting to hurt the
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        > Phobos really burns up the tires. Its crossing Mars right now, which I
        > think
        > takes a bit under an hour. I'm planning on defeating it as well tonight,
        > about 120 minutes from now. Unless it's in the birch trees.
        >
        > Mike
        >


        OK, so Phobos wins for tonight.

        Seeing has degraded a bit, and after a couple hours sitting out at 10
        degrees F, aluminum parts are starting to hurt the fingers. At some point,
        the work required to bring all the gear back inside is realized to be about
        equal with what's left in you.

        I will have my way with Phobos this apparition I tell you!
        Good night!
      • Tube Tim
        ... Another nice observing report Mike. With all the glare from Mars it s amazing you re able to see Deimios. I gave it up for a lost cause but will try next
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          >--- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Mike C" <mike@s...> wrote:
          >

          Another nice observing report Mike. With all the glare from Mars it's
          amazing you're able to see Deimios. I gave it up for a lost cause
          but will try next time. Your previous post and picture with the
          equipment frosted up put chills down my spin. You'll be happy to know
          it was 70F here last night and clear. I couldn't stay up for Mars
          however.


          Tim

          >
          > I've been watching Mars.. again.. At 396x in a pair of 6mm monocentric
          > eyepieces, I can easily lock on to Deimos and hold it in averted
          vision,
          > with Mars sitting there lighting up the eyepiece a good bit. If I
          shift
          > Mars just out of the eyepiece, Deimos becomes dead obvious. I can
          almost
          > grab it with direct vision then, but not quite.
          >
          > The show changes fast !
          >
          > While watching Sinus Sabaeus crawl across Mars, I just knew it had
          to be a
          > martian moon that kept popping in and out of sight off the port bow. In
          > order to determine what it was, I noted it's distance from Mars in
          > Mars-widths, and what angle it was at relative to Syrtis Major and
          Sinus
          > Sabaeus. Came inside, ID'd it as Deimos using Skytools-2, and then
          warmed up
          > for half an hour. Deimos has obviously moved a bit on return.
          >
          > You can see it's pretty well off of Mars as I've seen it tonight
          (white dot
          > to the right:)
          > http://makeashorterlink.com/?T2FF1241C
          >
          > Phobos really burns up the tires. Its crossing Mars right now, which
          I think
          > takes a bit under an hour. I'm planning on defeating it as well
          tonight,
          > about 120 minutes from now. Unless it's in the birch trees.
          >
          > Mike
          >
        • Mike C
          ... Deimos was so easy to see last night that I was sure I was going to get Phobos. (Phobos is what, 2 times brighter than Deimos?) I still believe I would
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            > Another nice observing report Mike. With all the glare from Mars it's
            > amazing you're able to see Deimios. I gave it up for a lost cause
            > but will try next time. Your previous post and picture with the
            > equipment frosted up put chills down my spin. You'll be happy to know
            > it was 70F here last night and clear. I couldn't stay up for Mars
            > however.
            >
            >
            > Tim


            Deimos was so easy to see last night that I was sure I was going to get
            Phobos. (Phobos is what, 2 times brighter than Deimos?) I still believe I
            would have, if the seeing hadn't dropped off a bit. When I went back out I
            had a hard time re-aquiring Deimos.

            I think I had a bit of good fortune with Deimos. I wasn't looking for it at
            all. It's location in the eyepiece, due to my orientation at the scope and
            at the binoviewer, placed Deimos right in an averted vision hot spot, so
            when I was really concentrating on seeing details around Sinus Sabaeus,
            Deimos was over there lighting up hard.

            As for glare from Mars, it just so happened before this session I cleaned
            every surface of my binoviewer, prism diagonal and supermonocentrics again.
            I think it helps with reducing glare, a lot. Deimos was so easy though that
            I could even see it with my crappy scratched up eyeglasses on.

            Also last night I switched back and forth between 250x and 396x with Deimos,
            and found it much easier to aquire the moon at the higher power. Flare
            seemed more destructive to the goal in the 10mm supermonos than in the 6mm
            supermonos.

            Mike
          • S. Kent Blackwell
            It s a cinch to make an occulting eyepiece for viewing Deimos, and certain double stars as well. I used layers of black electrical tape (it requires multiple
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              It's a cinch to make an occulting eyepiece for viewing Deimos, and certain
              double stars as well. I used layers of black electrical tape (it requires
              multiple layers) at the field stop. My 8mm Edmund RKE eyepiece was the
              perfect ocular because the field stop is exposed. I'm writing an article on
              the very subject in the next few weeks. If you'd like a copy let me know
              offline.

              Kent Blackwell
              kent@...

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Mike C" <mike@...>
              To: <tmboptical@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 3:42 PM
              Subject: Re: [tmboptical] Re: Deimos in the 175/8


              >
              > > Another nice observing report Mike. With all the glare from Mars it's
              > > amazing you're able to see Deimios. I gave it up for a lost cause
              > > but will try next time. Your previous post and picture with the
              > > equipment frosted up put chills down my spin. You'll be happy to know
              > > it was 70F here last night and clear. I couldn't stay up for Mars
              > > however.
              > >
              > >
              > > Tim
              >
              >
              > Deimos was so easy to see last night that I was sure I was going to get
              > Phobos. (Phobos is what, 2 times brighter than Deimos?) I still believe I
              > would have, if the seeing hadn't dropped off a bit. When I went back out I
              > had a hard time re-aquiring Deimos.
              >
              > I think I had a bit of good fortune with Deimos. I wasn't looking for it
              at
              > all. It's location in the eyepiece, due to my orientation at the scope and
              > at the binoviewer, placed Deimos right in an averted vision hot spot, so
              > when I was really concentrating on seeing details around Sinus Sabaeus,
              > Deimos was over there lighting up hard.
              >
              > As for glare from Mars, it just so happened before this session I cleaned
              > every surface of my binoviewer, prism diagonal and supermonocentrics
              again.
              > I think it helps with reducing glare, a lot. Deimos was so easy though
              that
              > I could even see it with my crappy scratched up eyeglasses on.
              >
              > Also last night I switched back and forth between 250x and 396x with
              Deimos,
              > and found it much easier to aquire the moon at the higher power. Flare
              > seemed more destructive to the goal in the 10mm supermonos than in the 6mm
              > supermonos.
              >
              > Mike
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Mike C
              Here s my artist impression of last nights view of Mars. I was observing for maybe two hours in the TMB175/8 using the Baader bino and dual 6mm TMB
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Here's my "artist" impression of last nights view of Mars. I was observing
                for maybe two hours in the TMB175/8 using the Baader bino and dual 6mm TMB
                supermonocentric eyepieces for about 396x.

                I transferred the most contrasty features from last nights crude sketch to
                Photoshop, and then tried and paint out the more subtle albedo features over
                lunch.

                Deimos is seen outside the glare to the left. I usually dont put glare in my
                drawings but for the purpose of realism with Deimos it's a bit closer to the
                true story -- the actual glare was worse.

                http://www.scopenews.com/tmb175/mars/mars1101_deimos_sm.jpg

                Mike
              • Eric Baumgartner
                Hi, Mike: That s a great sketch! What did you use? Pastels? Could you post a higher-resolution image of the drawing so that we could have a better look at your
                Message 7 of 12 , Nov 2, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi, Mike:

                  That's a great sketch! What did you use? Pastels?

                  Could you post a higher-resolution image of the drawing so that we could
                  have a better look at your artistic handiwork?

                  I sketch at the eyepiece, too, but strictly in grayscale.

                  Clear skies,

                  Eric Baumgartner
                  Redding, CT USA





                  On 11/01/05 6:04 PM, "Mike C" <mike@...> wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  > Here's my "artist" impression of last nights view of Mars. I was observing
                  > for maybe two hours in the TMB175/8 using the Baader bino and dual 6mm TMB
                  > supermonocentric eyepieces for about 396x.
                  >
                  > I transferred the most contrasty features from last nights crude sketch to
                  > Photoshop, and then tried and paint out the more subtle albedo features over
                  > lunch.
                  >
                  > Deimos is seen outside the glare to the left. I usually dont put glare in my
                  > drawings but for the purpose of realism with Deimos it's a bit closer to the
                  > true story -- the actual glare was worse.
                  >
                  > http://www.scopenews.com/tmb175/mars/mars1101_deimos_sm.jpg
                  >
                  > Mike



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Mike C
                  ... Thanks Eric, my eyepiece sketches are awful, I draw the most contrasty regions then re-draw them and paint the coloration when I m warm, using Photoshop.
                  Message 8 of 12 , Nov 2, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > Hi, Mike:
                    >
                    > That's a great sketch! What did you use? Pastels?
                    >
                    > Could you post a higher-resolution image of the drawing so that we could
                    > have a better look at your artistic handiwork?
                    >
                    > I sketch at the eyepiece, too, but strictly in grayscale.
                    >
                    > Clear skies,
                    >
                    > Eric Baumgartner
                    > Redding, CT USA


                    Thanks Eric, my eyepiece sketches are awful, I draw the most contrasty
                    regions then re-draw them and paint the coloration when I'm warm, using
                    Photoshop. So they're pure digital. OK, here's a bigger one:
                    http://www.scopenews.com/tmb175/mars/mars1101_deimos.jpg

                    best wishes
                    Mike
                  • Tube Tim
                    ... I think Herschel used PS when he sketched too, or was it MS Paint? ... Nice image and an interesting technique. Once Jupiter returns, I have a round, white
                    Message 9 of 12 , Nov 2, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      >--- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Mike C" <mike@s...> wrote:
                      >

                      >
                      > Thanks Eric, my eyepiece sketches are awful, I draw the most
                      > contrasty
                      > regions then re-draw them and paint the coloration when I'm warm,
                      > using
                      > Photoshop. So they're pure digital. OK, here's a bigger one:

                      I think Herschel used PS when he sketched too, or was it MS Paint?

                      :-)


                      > http://www.scopenews.com/tmb175/mars/mars1101_deimos.jpg

                      Nice image and an interesting technique.


                      Once Jupiter returns, I have a round, white pebble I found that, with
                      some color pencil marks will make a good rendition of the planet.


                      Tim



                      > best wishes
                      > Mike
                      >
                    • Mike C
                      ... Must of been PS, Herschel was a devout Macintosh user. He would roll over in his grave if he heard his name being bantered about in the same statement as
                      Message 10 of 12 , Nov 2, 2005
                      • 0 Attachment
                        >
                        > I think Herschel used PS when he sketched too, or was it MS Paint?
                        >
                        > :-)


                        Must of been PS, Herschel was a devout Macintosh user. He would roll over in
                        his grave if he heard his name being bantered about in the same statement as
                        "MS".... (pssst.... I use MS XP myself)

                        >
                        >
                        >> http://www.scopenews.com/tmb175/mars/mars1101_deimos.jpg
                        >
                        > Nice image and an interesting technique.
                        >

                        Thanks!

                        I don't like to make the images this big but Eric asked nicely. I paint them
                        big and then shrink them down. Smaller images are more like the eyepiece
                        and hide more of the sins of it being an "impression". For example, the
                        north edge of Sinus Sabaeus in my drawing -- I couldn't see those exact
                        lumps on it, but during best seeing I did see a sharply defined and lumpy
                        edge to it. My drawing tries to communicate the impression of lumps on the
                        north edge, not the exact size and location of the lumps. :) You start
                        making your planetary drawings huge and it gives the viewer a false
                        impression as to accuracy, feature placement, and what the feeling is like
                        at the eyepiece.

                        >
                        > Once Jupiter returns, I have a round, white pebble I found that, with
                        > some color pencil marks will make a good rendition of the planet.
                        >
                        >
                        > Tim
                        >

                        Now that's a cool idea. Must be a big pebble ! If I'm not mistaken,
                        Herschel started with pebble models, but ended up working a pottery wheel at
                        the eyepiece. Try it... :)

                        Mike
                      • Donald Rosenfield
                        We re talking here about Fred Herschel, right? :) Donald Now that s a cool idea. Must be a big pebble ! If I m not mistaken, Herschel started with pebble
                        Message 11 of 12 , Nov 2, 2005
                        • 0 Attachment
                          We're talking here about Fred Herschel, right? :)

                          Donald



                          Now that's a cool idea. Must be a big pebble ! If I'm not mistaken,
                          Herschel started with pebble models, but ended up working a pottery wheel at
                          the eyepiece. Try it... :)

                          Mike

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Tube Tim
                          ... No way, he started with an Altair 8080. Or was that 8800? ... eyepiece ... lumpy ... on the ... is like ... That s a good way to do it. ... It s about
                          Message 12 of 12 , Nov 2, 2005
                          • 0 Attachment
                            >--- In tmboptical@yahoogroups.com, "Mike C" <mike@s...> wrote:
                            >

                            >
                            >
                            > Must of been PS, Herschel was a devout Macintosh user. He would roll
                            > over in his grave if he heard his name being bantered about in the
                            > same statement as "MS".... (pssst.... I use MS XP myself)
                            >

                            No way, he started with an Altair 8080. Or was that 8800?


                            >
                            > I don't like to make the images this big but Eric asked nicely. I
                            > paint them
                            > big and then shrink them down. Smaller images are more like the
                            eyepiece
                            > and hide more of the sins of it being an "impression". For example, the
                            > north edge of Sinus Sabaeus in my drawing -- I couldn't see those exact
                            > lumps on it, but during best seeing I did see a sharply defined and
                            lumpy
                            > edge to it. My drawing tries to communicate the impression of lumps
                            on the
                            > north edge, not the exact size and location of the lumps. :) You start
                            > making your planetary drawings huge and it gives the viewer a false
                            > impression as to accuracy, feature placement, and what the feeling
                            is like
                            > at the eyepiece.



                            That's a good way to do it.


                            >
                            > >
                            > > Once Jupiter returns, I have a round, white pebble I found that, with
                            > > some color pencil marks will make a good rendition of the planet.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Tim
                            > >
                            >
                            > Now that's a cool idea. Must be a big pebble !

                            It's about 1.25" diameter. It's neat in that it's oblong like the
                            planet, is the white milky quartz and is shattered in such a way that
                            the bands are almost there already.

                            I see a lot of other quartz rocks that are similar but they are
                            contaminated by this stuff that looks just like yellow lead. I throw
                            all those rocks away.


                            >If I'm not mistaken, Herschel started with pebble models, but
                            > ended up working a pottery wheel at
                            > the eyepiece. Try it... :)
                            >

                            What can I say but great minds think alike. :-)


                            Tim

                            > Mike
                            >
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.