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TMB 105/650 !

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  • Mark Jenkins
    My TMB 105/650 arrived today. Thomas really knows how to pack things to assure a safe trip through the UPS delivery channel. When I opened the case I was
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 21, 2000
      My TMB 105/650 arrived today. Thomas really knows how to pack things to
      assure a safe trip through the UPS delivery channel.

      When I opened the case I was surprised at the size the OTA. Very short but
      extremely fat! It's amazing how much this scope expands once you screw on
      the extension, 3" - 2" adapter and extend the dew shield. A true engineering
      marvel and quite a work of art. Words that came to mind: Gorgeous,
      Beautiful, and Cute.

      Imagine my surprise when as I was finishing up with the fire wood delivery
      guy I looked up to a pristine clear sky with the gas giants placed
      prominently up just begging to be observed!

      I shook my head in disbelief! This is not supposed to happen what with the
      new scope curse and all. Oh well, I decided that no matter how cold it was
      (and it was damn cold) I was not going to anger the sky gods by leaving this
      scope in its case.

      I took Dave's advice and placed the OTA outside with the lens cell fully
      exposed and the diagonal (AP MaxBright) off while I went to pick up the dog
      from the beauty shop, and then finished setting up the 400 GTO.

      A very quick polar alignment and I was pointing at Jupiter. The 17mm Nagler
      4 showed very nice detail but small image scale due to it providing only
      38x. Absolute blackness surrounded the planet. I switched to the 6mm Radian
      and observed one of Jupiters moons on the very edge. It actually looked like
      a bump on the edge. I sat and observed as it continued to separate from the
      planet. Very cool!

      Seeing was so so. It came and went but then so did I as I had to duck inside
      to get warm every 15 minutes or so. It was -4 degrees with a wind chill of
      -40! brrrrrr.

      As I popped in and out for quick 15 minute observations I started to realize
      that I was seeing detail I had never seen before. Bands and more bands
      popped into view as the seeing approached very good to excellent for brief
      moments. The GRS came around later in the night. I could see two very thin
      bands below the GRS. The polar regions had differing contrast levels. I
      could definitely make out festoons (is that the correct terminology?)
      jutting into the central band from the larger bands above and below.

      I switched to the 3mm Radian when Jupiter was near zenith. I really like my
      3mm Radian now! I never really liked that eyepiece in the SDF. hmmmm.
      Contrast was amazing. I never saw this level of detail with my SDF. Not a
      hint of chromatic aberration unlike my SDF which had noticeable CA on
      Jupiter.

      The moons were distinct disks! A first for me!

      Saturn. Again, the contrast was knocking my socks off. Cassini was no
      problem. I could very easily see color differences in the A and B rings. I
      caught fleeting glimpses of what I think is the C ring but I am not that
      experienced. Could easily make out the band above the rings and also what
      appeared to be the shadow of the rings on the planet. Impressive to say the
      least.

      On to Orion. Nebula was nice but I have a fair amount of light pollution in
      that area so I didn't hang on it too long. I was after the Trapezium stars.
      With the 17mm Nagler 4 I could easily make out three with a hint of the 4th.
      The 6mm radian showed all 4 very prominently. I was going after "E" so I put
      in the 3mm Radian. I think I glimpsed "E" for a very brief moment but It may
      had been wishful on my part as the seeing just would not allow a definitive
      observation. I barlowed the 3mm but things just turned to mush due to the
      seeing.

      For being so cold it was a wonderful night. I can't wait till we warm up a
      bit to say 20 or even 30 degrees. It will feel like a heat wave compared to
      tonight.

      I am very impressed with the scope so far. If tonight is any indication of
      it's performance level I can't wait until I can spend a lot more time with
      it without risking frostbite!

      Please forgive my level of experience reporting what I observed as I have
      only been into amateur astronomy for little over a year now. Most of that
      time was spent trying to get good at astrophotography. Which reminds me! The
      Field Flattener is huge! I never expected it to be so big based on the
      photos that I have seen.

      Many thanks to Thomas and Markus for producing such a wonderful instrument.
      I look forward to improving my astrophotography efforts as well as my
      observational techniques with this scope being my main piece of equipment in
      that pursuit.

      Clear Skies, Happy Holidays, and Stay Warm!


      Mark Jenkins
      markj@...
      http://www.pcsincnet.com/astronomy/
    • Tim Povlick
      Mark, Sounds like an incredible scope (I m not surprised). Thanks for posting your first experiences with it. I have heard several people mention the TMB
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 22, 2000
        Mark,

        Sounds like an incredible scope (I'm not
        surprised). Thanks for posting your first
        experiences with it. I have heard several
        people mention the TMB scopes are bigger than
        they expected, guess it's the 4" focuser.
        What surprised me was the size and weight
        of the field flattner. Photos should be
        top notch thru this scope.

        Wonder what kind of camera you are going to
        use with the scope and the film type? Myself,
        I am using a Pentax 67II and PPF-400 print
        film. I am awaiting some new bearings to
        upgrade my Losmandy G-11, which are needed to
        help with tracking.

        Looking forward to further reports and some
        astrophotos.

        Side Note: Instead of wood, try to get ahold
        of some hard coal (anthracite). It burns hot
        and very clean.


        Enjoy your new Christmas toy.

        Happy Holidays to All.

        Tim


        --- In tmboptical@egroups.com, Mark Jenkins <markj@p...> wrote:
        > My TMB 105/650 arrived today.
      • apm_telescopes@web.de
        ... Von: Tim Povlick An: tmboptical@egroups.com Datum: Freitag, 22. Dezember 2000 22:02 Betreff: [tmboptical] Re:
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 22, 2000
          -----Urspr√ľngliche Nachricht-----
          Von: Tim Povlick <potentate@...>
          An: tmboptical@egroups.com <tmboptical@egroups.com>
          Datum: Freitag, 22. Dezember 2000 22:02
          Betreff: [tmboptical] Re: TMB 105/650 !


          >
          >Mark,
          >
          >Sounds like an incredible scope (I'm not
          >surprised). Thanks for posting your first
          >experiences with it. I have heard several
          >people mention the TMB scopes are bigger than
          >they expected, guess it's the 4" focuser.
          >What surprised me was the size and weight
          >of the field flattner. Photos should be
          >top notch thru this scope.

          the lenses have an diameter of 76 mm and if the big 6x7 camera is attached,
          the housing must be strong

          Markus
          >
          >Wonder what kind of camera you are going to
          >use with the scope and the film type? Myself,
          >I am using a Pentax 67II and PPF-400 print
          >film. I am awaiting some new bearings to
          >upgrade my Losmandy G-11, which are needed to
          >help with tracking.
          >
          >Looking forward to further reports and some
          >astrophotos.
          >
          >Side Note: Instead of wood, try to get ahold
          >of some hard coal (anthracite). It burns hot
          >and very clean.
          >
          >
          >Enjoy your new Christmas toy.
          >
          >Happy Holidays to All.
          >
          >Tim
          >
          >
          >--- In tmboptical@egroups.com, Mark Jenkins <markj@p...> wrote:
          >> My TMB 105/650 arrived today.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          >tmboptical-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          >
          >
          >
        • David Novoselsky
          Great report and I am very happy for you, Mark. I can t, however, take credit for the cool down trick you attribute to me. That was advice Tom gave me when
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 22, 2000
            Great report and I am very happy for you, Mark. I can't, however,
            take credit for the 'cool down' trick you attribute to me. That was
            advice Tom gave me when I got my 4" from him. Credit were credit is
            due. One other thing Tom and I just discussed. Thermal shock. In
            these extreme conditions, when you bring the scope inside, it is
            going to ice up. Do NOT try to heat or even touch the objective. My
            SKY90 did that recently and I simply let the lens sit uncovered, and
            took the plug and adapter off the focuser so as the ice melted and
            the condensation gradually faded by the next morning, no water built
            up on the inside of the objective or cell. I will let Tom or Mike
            and other more experienced observers jump in with their own tips, but
            do NOT try to 'warm up' a frozen objective, just let it be, and if
            possible, if there is a slighlty cooler part of the house or an
            enclosed porch, consider leaving it there for a bit before going from
            a -5 or so outside to a 70 deg and more humid enviornment. Sorry for
            the tirade, and if you already knew all of this, I do apologize. I
            just get nervous thinking about it. Dave

            --- In tmboptical@egroups.com, Mark Jenkins <markj@p...> wrote:
            > My TMB 105/650 arrived today. Thomas really knows how to pack
            things to
            > assure a safe trip through the UPS delivery channel.
            >
            > When I opened the case I was surprised at the size the OTA. Very
            short but
            > extremely fat! It's amazing how much this scope expands once you
            screw on
            > the extension, 3" - 2" adapter and extend the dew shield. A true
            engineering
            > marvel and quite a work of art. Words that came to mind: Gorgeous,
            > Beautiful, and Cute.
            >
            > Imagine my surprise when as I was finishing up with the fire wood
            delivery
            > guy I looked up to a pristine clear sky with the gas giants placed
            > prominently up just begging to be observed!
            >
            > I shook my head in disbelief! This is not supposed to happen what
            with the
            > new scope curse and all. Oh well, I decided that no matter how cold
            it was
            > (and it was damn cold) I was not going to anger the sky gods by
            leaving this
            > scope in its case.
            >
            > I took Dave's advice and placed the OTA outside with the lens cell
            fully
            > exposed and the diagonal (AP MaxBright) off while I went to pick up
            the dog
            > from the beauty shop, and then finished setting up the 400 GTO.
            >
            > A very quick polar alignment and I was pointing at Jupiter. The
            17mm Nagler
            > 4 showed very nice detail but small image scale due to it providing
            only
            > 38x. Absolute blackness surrounded the planet. I switched to the
            6mm Radian
            > and observed one of Jupiters moons on the very edge. It actually
            looked like
            > a bump on the edge. I sat and observed as it continued to separate
            from the
            > planet. Very cool!
            >
            > Seeing was so so. It came and went but then so did I as I had to
            duck inside
            > to get warm every 15 minutes or so. It was -4 degrees with a wind
            chill of
            > -40! brrrrrr.
            >
            > As I popped in and out for quick 15 minute observations I started
            to realize
            > that I was seeing detail I had never seen before. Bands and more
            bands
            > popped into view as the seeing approached very good to excellent
            for brief
            > moments. The GRS came around later in the night. I could see two
            very thin
            > bands below the GRS. The polar regions had differing contrast
            levels. I
            > could definitely make out festoons (is that the correct
            terminology?)
            > jutting into the central band from the larger bands above and below.
            >
            > I switched to the 3mm Radian when Jupiter was near zenith. I really
            like my
            > 3mm Radian now! I never really liked that eyepiece in the SDF.
            hmmmm.
            > Contrast was amazing. I never saw this level of detail with my SDF.
            Not a
            > hint of chromatic aberration unlike my SDF which had noticeable CA
            on
            > Jupiter.
            >
            > The moons were distinct disks! A first for me!
            >
            > Saturn. Again, the contrast was knocking my socks off. Cassini was
            no
            > problem. I could very easily see color differences in the A and B
            rings. I
            > caught fleeting glimpses of what I think is the C ring but I am not
            that
            > experienced. Could easily make out the band above the rings and
            also what
            > appeared to be the shadow of the rings on the planet. Impressive to
            say the
            > least.
            >
            > On to Orion. Nebula was nice but I have a fair amount of light
            pollution in
            > that area so I didn't hang on it too long. I was after the
            Trapezium stars.
            > With the 17mm Nagler 4 I could easily make out three with a hint of
            the 4th.
            > The 6mm radian showed all 4 very prominently. I was going after "E"
            so I put
            > in the 3mm Radian. I think I glimpsed "E" for a very brief moment
            but It may
            > had been wishful on my part as the seeing just would not allow a
            definitive
            > observation. I barlowed the 3mm but things just turned to mush due
            to the
            > seeing.
            >
            > For being so cold it was a wonderful night. I can't wait till we
            warm up a
            > bit to say 20 or even 30 degrees. It will feel like a heat wave
            compared to
            > tonight.
            >
            > I am very impressed with the scope so far. If tonight is any
            indication of
            > it's performance level I can't wait until I can spend a lot more
            time with
            > it without risking frostbite!
            >
            > Please forgive my level of experience reporting what I observed as
            I have
            > only been into amateur astronomy for little over a year now. Most
            of that
            > time was spent trying to get good at astrophotography. Which
            reminds me! The
            > Field Flattener is huge! I never expected it to be so big based on
            the
            > photos that I have seen.
            >
            > Many thanks to Thomas and Markus for producing such a wonderful
            instrument.
            > I look forward to improving my astrophotography efforts as well as
            my
            > observational techniques with this scope being my main piece of
            equipment in
            > that pursuit.
            >
            > Clear Skies, Happy Holidays, and Stay Warm!
            >
            >
            > Mark Jenkins
            > markj@p...
            > http://www.pcsincnet.com/astronomy/
          • ky8m@webtv.net
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 31, 2000
              --- In tmboptical@egroups.com, Mark Jenkins <markj@p...> wrote:
              > My TMB 105/650 arrived today. Thomas really knows how to pack things to
              > assure a safe trip through the UPS delivery channel.
              >
              > When I opened the case I was surprised at the size the OTA. Very short but
              > extremely fat! It's amazing how much this scope expands once you screw on
              > the extension, 3" - 2" adapter and extend the dew shield. A true engineering
              > marvel and quite a work of art. Words that came to mind: Gorgeous,
              > Beautiful, and Cute.
              >
              > Imagine my surprise when as I was finishing up with the fire wood delivery
              > guy I looked up to a pristine clear sky with the gas giants placed
              > prominently up just begging to be observed!
              >
              > I shook my head in disbelief! This is not supposed to happen what with the
              > new scope curse and all. Oh well, I decided that no matter how cold it was
              > (and it was damn cold) I was not going to anger the sky gods by leaving this
              > scope in its case.
              >
              > I took Dave's advice and placed the OTA outside with the lens cell fully
              > exposed and the diagonal (AP MaxBright) off while I went to pick up the dog
              > from the beauty shop, and then finished setting up the 400 GTO.
              >
              > A very quick polar alignment and I was pointing at Jupiter. The 17mm Nagler
              > 4 showed very nice detail but small image scale due to it providing only
              > 38x. Absolute blackness surrounded the planet. I switched to the 6mm Radian
              > and observed one of Jupiters moons on the very edge. It actually looked like
              > a bump on the edge. I sat and observed as it continued to separate from the
              > planet. Very cool!
              >
              > Seeing was so so. It came and went but then so did I as I had to duck inside
              > to get warm every 15 minutes or so. It was -4 degrees with a wind chill of
              > -40! brrrrrr.
              >
              > As I popped in and out for quick 15 minute observations I started to realize
              > that I was seeing detail I had never seen before. Bands and more bands
              > popped into view as the seeing approached very good to excellent for brief
              > moments. The GRS came around later in the night. I could see two very thin
              > bands below the GRS. The polar regions had differing contrast levels. I
              > could definitely make out festoons (is that the correct terminology?)
              > jutting into the central band from the larger bands above and below.
              >
              > I switched to the 3mm Radian when Jupiter was near zenith. I really like my
              > 3mm Radian now! I never really liked that eyepiece in the SDF. hmmmm.
              > Contrast was amazing. I never saw this level of detail with my SDF. Not a
              > hint of chromatic aberration unlike my SDF which had noticeable CA on
              > Jupiter.
              >
              > The moons were distinct disks! A first for me!
              >
              > Saturn. Again, the contrast was knocking my socks off. Cassini was no
              > problem. I could very easily see color differences in the A and B rings. I
              > caught fleeting glimpses of what I think is the C ring but I am not that
              > experienced. Could easily make out the band above the rings and also what
              > appeared to be the shadow of the rings on the planet. Impressive to say the
              > least.
              >
              > On to Orion. Nebula was nice but I have a fair amount of light pollution in
              > that area so I didn't hang on it too long. I was after the Trapezium stars.
              > With the 17mm Nagler 4 I could easily make out three with a hint of the 4th.
              > The 6mm radian showed all 4 very prominently. I was going after "E" so I put
              > in the 3mm Radian. I think I glimpsed "E" for a very brief moment but It may
              > had been wishful on my part as the seeing just would not allow a definitive
              > observation. I barlowed the 3mm but things just turned to mush due to the
              > seeing.
              >
              > For being so cold it was a wonderful night. I can't wait till we warm up a
              > bit to say 20 or even 30 degrees. It will feel like a heat wave compared to
              > tonight.
              >
              > I am very impressed with the scope so far. If tonight is any indication of
              > it's performance level I can't wait until I can spend a lot more time with
              > it without risking frostbite!
              >
              > Please forgive my level of experience reporting what I observed as I have
              > only been into amateur astronomy for little over a year now. Most of that
              > time was spent trying to get good at astrophotography. Which reminds me! The
              > Field Flattener is huge! I never expected it to be so big based on the
              > photos that I have seen.
              >
              > Many thanks to Thomas and Markus for producing such a wonderful instrument.
              > I look forward to improving my astrophotography efforts as well as my
              > observational techniques with this scope being my main piece of equipment in
              > that pursuit.
              >
              > Clear Skies, Happy Holidays, and Stay Warm!
              >
              >
              > Mark Jenkins
              > markj@p...
              > Hi Mark thank you for the mini review, I am waiting for my 105 and it was great to hear a first light report on one, glad you took dave's advise. Mark will the dew shield retract with the ring's on. Gary
            • ky8m@webtv.net
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 31, 2000
                --- In tmboptical@egroups.com, Mark Jenkins <markj@p...> wrote:> My TMB 105/650 arrived today. Thomas really knows how to packthings to> assure a safe trip through the UPS delivery channel.> > When I opened the case I was surprised at the size the OTA. Veryshort but> extremely fat! It's amazing how much this scope expands once youscrew on> the extension, 3" - 2" adapter and extend the dew shield. A trueengineering> marvel and quite a work of art. Words that came to mind: Gorgeous,> Beautiful, and Cute.> > Imagine my surprise when as I was finishing up with the fire wooddelivery> guy I looked up to a pristine clear sky with the gas giants placed> prominently up just begging to be observed!> > I shook my head in disbelief! This is not supposed to happen whatwith the> new scope curse and all. Oh well, I decided that no matter how coldit was> (and it was damn cold) I was not going to anger the sky gods byleaving this> scope in its case.> > I took Dave's advice and placed the OTA outside with the lens cellfully> exposed and the diagonal (AP MaxBright) off while I went to pick upthe dog> from the beauty shop, and then finished setting up the 400 GTO.> > A very quick polar alignment and I was pointing at Jupiter. The17mm Nagler> 4 showed very nice detail but small image scale due to it providingonly> 38x. Absolute blackness surrounded the planet. I switched to the6mm Radian> and observed one of Jupiters moons on the very edge. It actuallylooked like> a bump on the edge. I sat and observed as it continued to separatefrom the> planet. Very cool!> > Seeing was so so. It came and went but then so did I as I had toduck inside> to get warm every 15 minutes or so. It was -4 degrees with a windchill of> -40! brrrrrr.> > As I popped in and out for quick 15 minute observations I startedto realize> that I was seeing detail I had never seen before. Bands and morebands> popped into view as the seeing approached very good to excellentfor brief> moments. The GRS came around later in the night
              • Mark Jenkins
                ... Hi Gary, Yes and no. Yes if you don t mind having to bolt them to your mounting plate or slider bar every time you want to setup. No if you want to keep
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 31, 2000
                  on 12/31/00 15:29, ky8m@... at ky8m@... wrote:

                  >> Hi Mark thank you for the mini review, I am waiting for my 105 and it was
                  >> great to hear a first light report on one, glad you took dave's advise. Mark
                  >> will the dew shield retract with the ring's on. Gary

                  Hi Gary,

                  Yes and no.

                  Yes if you don't mind having to bolt them to your mounting plate or slider
                  bar every time you want to setup.

                  No if you want to keep them ready for quick setup.

                  The space between the dew shield when it's extended, and the focusser is 7
                  3/8". This is presenting a small problem with my current mounting hardware.
                  To get the scope to balance in certain situations (like the 31mm Nagler 5 or
                  my Nikon F2 body) I cannot fully rotate the focusser as it will bump into
                  the mounting plate. I use an Astro-Physics DOVE08 & Slider Bar and it looks
                  like I will need to have both of them cut shorter to allow proper balance
                  and rotation of the focusser.

                  Also because of this "limited" area in which to place the scope in the
                  rings, I will have to make a custom aluminum plate to accommodate another
                  DOV08 on top of the rings for my quick setup piggy back accessories that
                  include an AP 80mm guidescope, camera mount and a yet to be purchased SBIG
                  STV auto guider.

                  --
                  Clear Skies!

                  Mark Jenkins
                  markj@...
                  http://www.pcsincnet.com/astronomy/
                • ky8m@webtv.net
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jan 1, 2001
                    --- In tmboptical@egroups.com, Mark Jenkins <markj@p...> wrote:> on 12/31/00 15:29, ky8m@w... at ky8m@w... wrote:> > >> Hi Mark thank you for the mini review, I am waiting for my 105and it was> >> great to hear a first light report on one, glad you took dave'sadvise. Mark> >> will the dew shield retract with the ring's on. Gary> > Hi Gary,> > Yes and no. > > Yes if you don't mind having to bolt them to your mounting plate orslider> bar every time you want to setup.> > No if you want to keep them ready for quick setup.> > The space between the dew shield when it's extended, and thefocusser is 7> 3/8". This is presenting a small problem with my current mountinghardware.> To get the scope to balance in certain situations (like the 31mmNagler 5 or> my Nikon F2 body) I cannot fully rotate the focusser as it willbump into> the mounting plate. I use an Astro-Physics DOVE08 & Slider Bar andit looks> like I will need to have both of them cut shorter to allow properbalance> and rotation of the focusser.> > Also because of this "limited" area in which to place the scope inthe> rings, I will have to make a custom aluminum plate to accommodateanother> DOV08 on top of the rings for my quick setup piggy back accessoriesthat> include an AP 80mm guidescope, camera mount and a yet to bepurchased SBIG> STV auto guider.> > --> Clear Skies!> > Thank you Mark I was concerned about the ring spacing, also pleasekeep the observing comming. Gary
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