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Was it me or Mee?

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  • ronbee77
    Well, after long absence, I have a chance to watch the Moon this week. My latest craze is to find crater chains on the Moon ... Anyway while meandering around
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1, 2004
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      Well, after long absence, I have a chance to watch the Moon this
      week. My latest craze is to find crater chains on the Moon ...
      Anyway while meandering around the terminator tonight with my 8"
      Discovery PDHQ Dob looking for the "lunar neckless" ;-), one crater
      caught my attention: crater Mee (I had quite a difficult time
      identifying the name of this seemingly obscured crater). The one
      feature that strikes me (not Mee ;-) really hard was the small white
      circular rays(?). See this picture from the Lunar Orbitter.
      http://members.cox.net/ronby/Moon-Sketches/Mee-1-PDHQ.jpg
      http://www.lpi.usra.edu/research/lunar_orbiter/images/img/iv_142_h2.jp
      g
      I observed from 9:15pm (4:15UT 05/01) - 11pm using my 6mm TV Radian
      (200x) with some of time spent on Jovian lunar transit ;-). Later I
      zeroed in with my 6mm and 5mm (250x) TMB SuperMonocentric eyepieces.

      Here's the lunar orbiter picture to refer to for the discussion that
      follows.
      http://members.cox.net/ronby/Moon-Sketches/Mee-2-PDHQ.jpg

      When the seeing steady, I immediately saw two crisp tiny craterlets
      (bottom 2 blue arrows). But what's this? The Radian was giving
      an impression of a "pit" over the white spot. After a while and
      still couldn't make out what they were, I resorted to my sharpest
      eyepiece: the TMB SuperMono. Because of its 30d AFOV, I don't like
      to use it on the undriven Dob normally. With the 5mm TMB and nudging
      extreme tolerance ;-), I was able to see what looked like a pit with
      a good degree of certainty, though it disappeared and reappeared with
      the seeing. Make no mistake; in the Orbiter's image, these features
      looked big but they were exceedingly small at 200x and 250x! For
      example, ME Q craterlet (the largest blue craterlet in the picture)
      is only 1km x 1km in size!

      I also check around the area to make sure I could see some of the
      other features as well. The features in pink and purple were very
      difficult. Remarkably, the 8-incher also revealed the darker color
      in the floor of the partial crater E (marked with purple polygons).
      Also, the dark gray color of the part of the crater Hainzel (top
      righthand corner in the image) seems to impart an impression of a
      "sea horse".

      As this white feature reminded me of the dark volcanic features inside
      Crater Alphonsus, I took the Orbiter image and reverse the color.
      http://www.lpi.usra.edu/research/lunar_orbiter/images/img/iv_108_h2.jp
      g
      Sure enough, it looked white just like the white feature in Mee!
      Don't believe it ;-)? Try it and let us know what you see. Also,
      because white on very light gray Moon can be difficult to see, I
      wonder if reverse the color can be a new way to finding more of these
      white features.

      So was it me that see the pit or was the pit not in Mee ;-)?

      Enjoy,
      Ron B[ee]
    • Norman L. Rubenstein
      Dear Ron: It is great to see a new observing report from you. As a Lunophile, it is doubly good to see an observing report of our too oft neglected nearest
      Message 2 of 2 , May 1, 2004
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        Dear Ron:

        It is great to see a new observing report from you. As a "Lunophile," it is
        doubly good to see an observing report of our too oft neglected nearest
        celestial neighbor. I am temporarily "scope-less", or I would try and
        confirm your "pit." Maybe someone else here (or from the Lunar List) will be
        able to do so.

        Thanks for the really interesting and very well presented report, and I hope
        to see many more from you soon!

        Best regards,

        Norm Rubenstein



        On 5/1/04 12:13 AM, "ronbee77" <ronby@...> wrote:

        > Well, after long absence, I have a chance to watch the Moon this
        > week. My latest craze is to find crater chains on the Moon ...
        > Anyway while meandering around the terminator tonight with my 8"
        > Discovery PDHQ Dob looking for the "lunar neckless" ;-), one crater
        > caught my attention: crater Mee (I had quite a difficult time
        > identifying the name of this seemingly obscured crater). The one
        > feature that strikes me (not Mee ;-) really hard was the small white
        > circular rays(?). See this picture from the Lunar Orbitter.
        > http://members.cox.net/ronby/Moon-Sketches/Mee-1-PDHQ.jpg
        > http://www.lpi.usra.edu/research/lunar_orbiter/images/img/iv_142_h2.jp
        > g
        > I observed from 9:15pm (4:15UT 05/01) - 11pm using my 6mm TV Radian
        > (200x) with some of time spent on Jovian lunar transit ;-). Later I
        > zeroed in with my 6mm and 5mm (250x) TMB SuperMonocentric eyepieces.
        >
        > Here's the lunar orbiter picture to refer to for the discussion that
        > follows.
        > http://members.cox.net/ronby/Moon-Sketches/Mee-2-PDHQ.jpg
        >
        > When the seeing steady, I immediately saw two crisp tiny craterlets
        > (bottom 2 blue arrows). But what's this? The Radian was giving
        > an impression of a "pit" over the white spot. After a while and
        > still couldn't make out what they were, I resorted to my sharpest
        > eyepiece: the TMB SuperMono. Because of its 30d AFOV, I don't like
        > to use it on the undriven Dob normally. With the 5mm TMB and nudging
        > extreme tolerance ;-), I was able to see what looked like a pit with
        > a good degree of certainty, though it disappeared and reappeared with
        > the seeing. Make no mistake; in the Orbiter's image, these features
        > looked big but they were exceedingly small at 200x and 250x! For
        > example, ME Q craterlet (the largest blue craterlet in the picture)
        > is only 1km x 1km in size!
        >
        > I also check around the area to make sure I could see some of the
        > other features as well. The features in pink and purple were very
        > difficult. Remarkably, the 8-incher also revealed the darker color
        > in the floor of the partial crater E (marked with purple polygons).
        > Also, the dark gray color of the part of the crater Hainzel (top
        > righthand corner in the image) seems to impart an impression of a
        > "sea horse".
        >
        > As this white feature reminded me of the dark volcanic features inside
        > Crater Alphonsus, I took the Orbiter image and reverse the color.
        > http://www.lpi.usra.edu/research/lunar_orbiter/images/img/iv_108_h2.jp
        > g
        > Sure enough, it looked white just like the white feature in Mee!
        > Don't believe it ;-)? Try it and let us know what you see. Also,
        > because white on very light gray Moon can be difficult to see, I
        > wonder if reverse the color can be a new way to finding more of these
        > white features.
        >
        > So was it me that see the pit or was the pit not in Mee ;-)?
        >
        > Enjoy,
        > Ron B[ee]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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