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Re: How would I sue an Assemblywoman in California?

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  • ibbblank
    It is what I was told. So, I asked for permission from the Attorney General. In our city we must ask for permission to sue the city, so, I believed the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 8, 2004
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      It is what I was told. So, I asked for "permission" from the Attorney
      General. In our city we must ask for permission to sue the city, so,
      I believed the person who told me I had to get permission to sue an
      Assemblywoman. If not, all the better. :>)


      --- In tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com, Advancepum@a... wrote:
      > Why would you need to get permission to sue an individual?
      > We are suing a school district in federal court without permission.
      > The federal Government is the only entity that I know of that you
      might need
      > permission to sue.
      > Paul from chicago
    • frogfrmr@frogfarm.org
      ... I guess you missed it when I pointed out that in California, the odds on one of your mere neighbors taking the required oath of office necessary to be
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 14, 2004
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        On Wednesday, June 2, 2004, at 05:58 PM, ibbblank wrote:

        > Do I need to get permission, as one does when sueing a city official?
        > Whom would I get that permission from?
        >

        I guess you missed it when I pointed out that in California, the odds on
        one of your mere neighbors taking the required oath of office necessary
        to be considered an office holder by one who waives no rights are indeed
        extra slim. See the California Constitution at Art. XX, section 3.
        Apply all the normal rules of English grammar. Have a good law
        dictionary handy for any words of which you aren't absolutely sure of
        the definition, for example, "all".

        Do you have some reason you want to vest a neighbor with powers over you
        that they otherwise do not have? Apparently, most people alive today DO
        have such a reason, as I find few willing or able to attempt to
        challenge the usurped authority of the elite over the ignorant. In
        three months of trying on the internet, I could not find more than two
        people willing to discuss it.

        This is why I find long discussions over the finer points of law and
        procedure mere mental masturbation
        on the part of people who unconsciously waive all their rights whenever
        it suits someone else who takes it upon themselves to make the request,
        much less a demand to do so.

        "How would I sue an Assemblywoman in California?" is a trick question.

        The answer is: "Show me the name of the neighbor who took and filed the
        required oath of office in order to enter into the duties of the office
        of assemblywoman in California."

        You can't sue what isn't there. Also, consider which mere neighbor you
        are ready to invest with the powers of a judge over you, since you have
        shown that you will waive SOME rights.
      • jm367@bellsouth.net
        Have you explored the writ of praemunire as an instrument to correct wayward, oathless public servants ? ... From: frogfrmr@frogfarm.org To:
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 15, 2004
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          Have you explored the writ of praemunire as an instrument to correct wayward, oathless public servants ?
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, June 14, 2004 1:09 PM
          Subject: Re: [tips_and_tricks] How would I sue an Assemblywoman in California?


          I guess you missed it when I pointed out that in California, the odds on
          one of your mere neighbors taking the required oath of office necessary
          to be considered an office holder by one who waives no rights are indeed
          extra slim. 
        • ibbblank
          OK, Can I sue a member of her office staff?
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 15, 2004
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            OK, Can I sue a member of her office staff?
          • Legalbear
            It is what I was told. So, I asked for permission from the Attorney General. In our city we must ask for permission to sue the city, so, I believed the
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 15, 2004
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              It is what I was told. So, I asked for "permission" from the Attorney
              General. In our city we must ask for permission to sue the city, so,
              I believed the person who told me I had to get permission to sue an
              Assemblywoman. If not, all the better. :>)

              You don't say what you want to sue for. If you want to sue for a general
              tort, you may need permission because of the 11th Amendment if you want the
              state to pay the claim. If you are suing her in her personal capacity, the
              11th amendment doesn't apply. If you are suing under 42 USC 1983 (civil
              rights violations) in her personal capacity, or, her official capacity for
              declaratory or injunctive relief, you do not need permission because of the
              Supremacy Clause. The phrase you would look for is "a waiver of
              governmental immunity."


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            • frogfrmr@frogfarm.org
              There can be no such animal as an oathless public servant. Having the oath is a prerequisite to becoming a public servant. Using a writ on a mere neighbor
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 4 9:02 PM
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                There can be no such animal as an oathless public servant.

                Having the oath is a prerequisite to becoming a public servant.

                Using a writ on a mere neighbor would only encourage more misbehavior.

                On Jun 15, 2004, at 10:12 AM, <jm367@...> wrote:

                > Have you explored the writ of praemunire as an instrument to correct
                > wayward, oathless public servants ?

                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: frogfrmr@...
                > To: tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Monday, June 14, 2004 1:09 PM
                > Subject: Re: [tips_and_tricks] How would I sue an Assemblywoman in
                > California?
                >
                > I guess you missed it when I pointed out that in California, the odds
                > on
                > one of your mere neighbors taking the required oath of office necessary
                > to be considered an office holder by one who waives no rights are
                > indeed
                > extra slim. 
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