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Have You Chosen that Which Cannot be Taken From You?? [3 Attachments]

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  • lg900df@rock.com
    Thanks...will look it over... There are original states of the 1st Union as described in the 2nd law, the Articles of Confederation as having
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 7, 2012
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      Thanks...will look it over...


      There are original states of the 1st Union as described in the 2nd law, the Articles of Confederation as having "sovereignty, freedom and independence". Those words negate the ability of making law within those states by any collective power. And then there are states of the 3rd law which are states formed within that municipal law while the territory of that law was owned by the confederacy, the United States of America--those 'federated" states are made a permanent part of the United States of America and were colloquially referred to as United States. The territory of those states is territory owned by and ceded to the United States of America --as awarded to them by the King of England---for which said new proprietary-owner [the confederacy, the United States of America] can make law for. The 4th law [the written constitution] is the more permanent law version of the 3rd law now called "supreme law" but the "of the land" is still of the same territorial makeup as existed before. All law is a distillation of power and authority-process from preceding law. The 4th law written constitution 'this constitution" includes the "constitution of the United States" as a play on words.....meaning the constituent-parts sense of a composition....for which a President of the United States takes an oral oath to defend/protect the United States--the territory owned by and ceded to the Untied States of America. 

      In 1955 I was born in California but not the State of California. "This state" can be found in any written "State of ___" constitution to be territory owned by and ceded to the United States of America. The State of California says it best in its constitution. 


      Thought exercise:
      Examine the Art VI vs Art II oath carefully and ask yourself this question: What is the point in defending a written piece of paper [aka 'this constitution"]? They printed a bunch of them...go get another..right? But there IS a point in having someone taking an oath to defend the territory and other assets of ownership....as an employee of the confederacy, the United States of America. The latter is the Art II oath. The President of the United States administers [along with Congress]  the United States--the territory and other assets owned by and ceded to the Untied States of America. Takes an oath to protect it. 



       

      >"where 'this state' their law..." 

      This "state" is not a de jure state. It refers to the state (international law) defined as the "U.S.".
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