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I had to deliver Peter Hendrickson at noon today to Milan FCI.

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  • dave
    Another acceptable way to get mail OUTSIDE residence claims: If you acquire a post office box, that name post office box is registered by the postal
    Message 1 of 25 , Jul 5, 2010
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      Another "acceptable way" to get mail OUTSIDE residence claims:



      If you acquire a post office box, that name "post office box" is registered
      by the postal service and ONLY for the delivery of mail to a post office
      box. Since you probably are not permitted to reside on post office property,
      you can't have a residence there. Further the Post Office requires a
      "permanent address" in order to get the PO BOX..so by admission, both are
      not the same. And since the courts use the genuine postal service to
      establish their own service of process, it's hard for court officer's to
      deny that one can't reside in a 6 x 6 inch box.

      Here are some tricks of the trade:

      . Rip the mailbox in front of your house out of the ground. Trust
      me..this will prevent a ton of problems. Cut off your detractors cleanly;
      don't put a forwarder on the mail! You can get general delivery..or..Get
      either a PO BOX or a PMB. Remember I said that the Post Office registered
      the name PO BOX .so no one else can use it such as "The UPS Store"..so they
      had to come up with a new name for UPS Store boxes and that name is "PMB".
      So if you get mail at a UPS Store or other private box service make SURE you
      use for example PMB 143.

      . On mail addressed to lawyers or courts make sure you caption it
      right under the address "A Mailing address of Convenience". This SHOULD
      force the court officer to look elsewhere for a jurisdictional establishment
      within the filing but you might have to raise it. In one case where the
      judge proceeded on, I simply sent the court a package with only the words
      "mailing address of convenience" highlighted, and a picture of the post
      office where I had scribbled across the front, "they won't let me live
      here." The judge tore into the attorney in her ruling saying no residence
      was established by her to invoke court jurisdiction and that court had
      nothing to do.

      . Lawyers will REMOVE the words PMB every time from their filings
      and letters to you. You must insert it back to them and remind them "mailing
      address of convenience".

      . In ALL collection matters when you receive a letter saying the
      letter is from a debt collector, the debt collector must invoke jurisdiction
      either where the contract was signed [hard to prove for CC debt], or where
      you reside. This the moving party must show the court to invoke its
      jurisdiction. [They don't and hope you don't notice.] The easiest way to
      show the court you are not in its jurisdiction is in the Court caption
      address. Simply eh?



      You can have multiple mailing addresses of convenience in a free society. In
      a free society only YOU can establish residence or domicile for if
      government could PLACE you someplace, you wouldn't be free would you?



      If you want an advanced discussion on this matter go to either
      www.edrivera.com and read the free material there..or become a student for
      life..for which if you study well, you WILL be rewarded the small cost of
      becoming a student many times over. Ed has some rock solid NEW material.




      I have never found any case law indicating that being a resident somehow
      waives rights; however, my experience tells me that it is absolutely the
      case. I find that the biggest admssion to being a resident is having a
      "residential" address. The only acceptable way to get mail is general mail
      and use that only.
    • Roger Hattman
      My comments are below. YES, YES, YES he is absolutely correct.  However, I have no experience with PO Box and PMB so I cannot comment on those.  One drawback
      Message 2 of 25 , Jul 5, 2010
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        My comments are below.

        YES, YES, YES he is absolutely correct.  However, I have no experience with PO Box and PMB so I cannot comment on those.  One drawback is as far as I know you cannot have a Driver License or Auto registration at a PO Box.

        .        On mail addressed to lawyers or courts make sure you caption it
        right under the address "A Mailing address of Convenience". This SHOULD
        force the court officer to look elsewhere for a jurisdictional establishment
        within the filing but you might have to raise it. In one case where the
        judge proceeded on, I simply sent the court a package with only the words
        "mailing address of convenience" highlighted, and a picture of the post
        office where I had scribbled across the front, "they won't let me live
        here." The judge tore into the attorney in her ruling saying no residence
        was established by her to invoke court jurisdiction and that court had
        nothing to do.
        Great thinking.

        .   

        You can have multiple mailing addresses of convenience in a free society. In
        a free society only YOU can establish residence or domicile for if
        government could PLACE you someplace, you wouldn't be free would you?
        Not only can you, but you should.  Since no special action is needed on your part (for general mail), when you are away, tell people to send you mail at whatever post office is handy.  General mail is the ultimate in convenience for those on the move (In my opinion, that is really everybody, unless you are either dead or a plant.)
      • Rickity
        I m not good at passing the forum rules but I thought this to be worth a last shot. My wife and I have use General Delivery for our incoming mail for about 12
        Message 3 of 25 , Jul 5, 2010
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          I'm not good at passing the forum rules but I thought this to be worth a
          last shot. My wife and I have use General Delivery for our incoming mail
          for about 12 years now. Yes, we had to fight for it but I put the
          postmaster over a barrel and it stuck to many of the clerks' amazement. If
          the recipient needs a "physical address" then we put the "physical address"
          of the post office along with "General Delivery." It works. My wife's and
          my driver's licenses both list general delivery as the address. Nothing
          works unless you try it. Most things don't work unless you fight for it. I
          believe the car registration would have to be accepted as well. Rickity






          "When someone who is honestly mistaken discovers the truth he is no longer
          mistaken or no longer honest."


          _____


          My comments are below.

          YES, YES, YES he is absolutely correct. However, I have no experience with
          PO Box and PMB so I cannot comment on those. One drawback is as far as I
          know you cannot have a Driver License or Auto registration at a PO Box.
        • Michael
          ... Yep. It was just about a decade ago, and it still brings a smile to my face.
          Message 4 of 25 , Jul 5, 2010
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            --- In tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com, Jake <jake_28079@...> wrote:
            > Must have been prior to 1 October 2000 because there
            > haven't been any district directors since - the office
            > was eliminated as a result of "restructuring".

            Yep. It was just about a decade ago, and it still brings
            a smile to my face.
          • hobot
            RESIDENCE makes all the difference in the world. If you ain t found evidence in black and white yet then you just ain t trying very hard. Anywho I ve solved
            Message 5 of 25 , Jul 5, 2010
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              RESIDENCE makes all the difference in the world.
              If you ain't found evidence in black and white yet then you just ain't
              trying very hard.
              Anywho I've solved all this in all ways via W8BEN and knowing the
              definitions of
              the treaties and Acts involving banks and taxes.
              After understanding the scope and confusing variations of W8BEN forms
              and this
              to use it, there is an attachment form [banks can provide IRS version of]
              that specifically covers US mailing address as convenience only not
              permanent
              home jurisdiction. See #2 in this site for example.
              http://www.bacflorida.com/en/customer-service/w8-forms.php

              Part I. Please check the appropriate box below and provide the
              information requested:
              􀂉 The U.S. mailing address provided on my Form W-8BEN presented to BAC
              Florida Bank
              is not my permanent residence address and is used for convenience
              purposes only, such
              as a vacation home, the home of a relative or some other address where
              receipt of mail
              and similar notices is particularly convenient.
              􀂉 Other – I explain below the reason for using the U.S. mailing address
              provided on my
              Form W-8BEN presented to BAC Florida Bank, despite the fact that such
              address is not
              my permanent residence address:
              ______________________________________________________________________
              ______________________________________________________________________
              I hereby provide a copy of one or both of the documents listed below
              (see document(s)
              checked) to support further my claim of foreign status.
              􀂉 Driver's License
              􀂉 Passport
              Signature: _________________________

              Non US resident address format.
              Johnny Appleseed
              111 Main Square #222
              Town, County, mail route 44, [use last 2 digits of ZIP as dejure postal
              route]
              Statename, United States of America [spelled out fully not abbreviated].

              hobot - used a current passport with same data as in W8BEN but striking
              out US citizen and underlining
              non citizen national, no SSN, no penalty. Used photo ID from clubs and
              schools or
              other non -gov't issued ID that requires a RESIDENCE in United States,
              but not America.
            • E Junker
              Yes you can use a PO Box for an address on a Driver License and Auto Registration. They frown on it at the DMV but we remind them that if a purse is stolen
              Message 6 of 25 , Jul 5, 2010
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                Yes you can use a PO Box for an address on a Driver License and Auto Registration. They frown on it at the DMV but we remind them that if a purse is stolen with ID and keys we have handed the address and the keys to the home. There's invariably a pause before the logic registers.

                This is true in N.M., at least.
              • Roger Hattman
                  Nothing works unless you try it.  Most things don t work unless you fight for it I could not agree more.  Registration to General Delivery was rather
                Message 7 of 25 , Jul 5, 2010
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                   "Nothing
                  works unless you try it.  Most things don't work unless you fight for it"
                   
                  I could not agree more.  Registration to General Delivery was rather easy for me, but it took me 3.5 years and several court battles to get "General Delivery" as my actual address at licensing.  I had no idea it would even work in their sytsem.   So far, I have had no problems with the "physical address" issue.  I usually play dumb when asked for one.


                   

                • Frog Farmer
                  ... One way to use a PO Box without calling attention to it is to use the address of the Post Office building, and use # in front of the number of the box
                  Message 8 of 25 , Jul 6, 2010
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                    > I have no experience
                    > with PO Box and PMB so I cannot comment on those.� One drawback is as
                    > far as I know you cannot have a Driver License�or Auto registration at
                    > a PO Box.

                    One way to use a PO Box without calling attention to it is to use the
                    address of the Post Office building, and use # in front of the number of
                    the box inside, like this:

                    Your Name
                    Post Office's Address on Main Street #123
                    City, State

                    You'll get it and nobody but you and the post office will know it isn't
                    a regular house.
                  • dave
                    Yes you are correct on driver s license..but think for a moment..a PMB is not a Post Office Box. So says the genuine USPS.right in their regulations. Most
                    Message 9 of 25 , Jul 6, 2010
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                      Yes you are correct on driver's license..but think for a moment..a PMB is
                      not a Post Office Box. So says the genuine USPS.right in their regulations.
                      Most driver's license places simply tell you "No Post Office Boxes." [Hint:
                      Ditto other government forms.] So here is the dialogue I went thru with the
                      DMV clerk..for me the Ohio DMV is just down the street from Mailboxes Etc
                      [my PMB location]:



                      Me: [Putting down 1776 Main Street PMB 123.]

                      DMV: Sir.we don't allow post office boxes.

                      Me: I didn't give you one.

                      DMV: Our system shows that as one.

                      Me: Only the Post Office has post office boxes..so says the postal
                      regulations. In fact they are the only ones permitted to use that name.

                      DMV: Well..I'm not sure..

                      Me: Look..the form clearly says "NO POST OFFICE BOXES"..do you see a genuine
                      post office over there? I don't. I don't see the flag.I don't see the
                      trucks..I don't see a post office there..so I clearly didn't give you a Post
                      Office Box.

                      DMV: Ok..I'll use the address you gave.







                      My comments are below.

                      YES, YES, YES he is absolutely correct. However, I have no experience with
                      PO Box and PMB so I cannot comment on those. One drawback is as far as I
                      know you cannot have a Driver License or Auto registration at a PO Box.
                    • dave
                      This really works. I use it all the time. You can use it for ambush tactics. Let your adversary keep filing stuff against it. At the last minute throw this
                      Message 10 of 25 , Jul 6, 2010
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                        This really works. I use it all the time. You can use it for "ambush"
                        tactics. Let your adversary keep filing stuff against it. At the last minute
                        throw this at the court...take a yellow highlighter to your address on your
                        adversary's filings....include a snap shot of the Post office with your
                        scribbled address of the post office along with, "Impossible to have a
                        residence/domicile here."





                        > I have no experience
                        > with PO Box and PMB so I cannot comment on those.  One drawback is as
                        > far as I know you cannot have a Driver License or Auto registration at
                        > a PO Box.

                        One way to use a PO Box without calling attention to it is to use the
                        address of the Post Office building, and use # in front of the number of
                        the box inside, like this:

                        Your Name
                        Post Office's Address on Main Street #123
                        City, State

                        You'll get it and nobody but you and the post office will know it isn't
                        a regular house.
                      • Thomas
                        Since the United States Post Office has been GONE since the mid-1970s, I use the format: c/o [care of:] Box XXXX, U.S.P.S. [UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE, a
                        Message 11 of 25 , Jul 7, 2010
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                          Since the United States Post Office has been GONE since the mid-1970s, I use the format:

                          c/o [care of:] Box XXXX, U.S.P.S. [UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE, a corporation] My Town, My State, U.S.A.

                          I have most of my snail-mail correspondents [even the State where I live] trained to use this format.

                          I have ALSO had to make the point that, while I MAY be homeless, I certainly cannot LIVE in my 4" x 6" x 8" mail receptacle.

                          "Frog Farmer" <frogfrmr@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > > I have no experience
                          > > with PO Box and PMB so I cannot comment on those.  One drawback is as
                          > > far as I know you cannot have a Driver License or Auto registration at
                          > > a PO Box.
                          >
                          > One way to use a PO Box without calling attention to it is to use the
                          > address of the Post Office building, and use # in front of the number of
                          > the box inside, like this:
                          >
                          > Your Name
                          > Post Office's Address on Main Street #123
                          > City, State
                          >
                          > You'll get it and nobody but you and the post office will know it isn't
                          > a regular house.
                        • Roger Hattman
                          Funny interaction. This verifies further what I have observed:  The computers will accept most any address.  The problem is usually the person, so just keep
                          Message 12 of 25 , Jul 8, 2010
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                            Funny interaction.
                            This verifies further what I have observed:  The computers will accept most any address.  The problem is usually the person, so just keep trying.
                            When I switched my alleged license after a fraudulent suspension to General Delivery (after years of registration at the same they still to switch my alleged license), I handed the clerk at an auto tag place (a private entity that has direct access to DMV computers) the following:  registration to General Delivery (GD), insurance (GD), an invoice from the county court for an alleged traffic infraction (General Post), and a hand signed letter from the head Licensing to a (different) general post addy (another separate story of corruption).  She looked at me with a look of panic.  
                             
                            Me:"It is not a PO Box.  I know you cannot use PO Box."
                            Clerk:  "Well, I can try it."
                             
                            Several minutes later she printed it all out.
                            Just be persistent.  Try different people.  I have to assume that these computers all work more or less the same and will accept most anything.  I should note that c/o addresses are also expressly forbidden, as well as PO Boxes. 
                             
                            In addition to being an essential element for challenging jurisdiction, having a non residential address is a big plus for privacy.
                             
                            My only concern is, how do you get a PMB without some street address or ID or something?  I love the ambush idea, though. 

                             

                          • jerry bell
                            The post office has not been gone since the mid 70 s Give this a try when you send the mail fill the front like this   c/o [care of] person name fill out the
                            Message 13 of 25 , Jul 8, 2010
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                              The post office has not been gone since the mid 70's Give this a try when you send the mail fill the front like this
                               
                              c/o [care of] person name
                              fill out the full address
                              Write out the full city and state name NO zip code
                               
                              Oh and by the way check this out you can send it for 2 cents per half ounce. this law has not been repealed.
                               
                              Test it with your friends and put this law inside the mail you send so if they give you any crap just tell them to follow the law and lack of knowing the law is no excuse.
                               
                               


                              --- On Wed, 7/7/10, Thomas <tthor.geo@...> wrote:

                              From: Thomas <tthor.geo@...>
                              Subject: [tips_and_tricks] Re: I had to deliver Peter Hendrickson at noon today to Milan FCI.
                              To: tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Wednesday, July 7, 2010, 7:33 PM

                               

                              Since the United States Post Office has been GONE since the mid-1970s, I use the format:

                              c/o [care of:] Box XXXX, U.S.P.S. [UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE, a corporation] My Town, My State, U.S.A.

                              I have most of my snail-mail correspondents [even the State where I live] trained to use this format.

                              I have ALSO had to make the point that, while I MAY be homeless, I certainly cannot LIVE in my 4" x 6" x 8" mail receptacle.

                              "Frog Farmer" <frogfrmr@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > > I have no experience
                              > > with PO Box and PMB so I cannot comment on those.  One drawback is as
                              > > far as I know you cannot have a Driver License or Auto registration at
                              > > a PO Box.
                              >
                              > One way to use a PO Box without calling attention to it is to use the
                              > address of the Post Office building, and use # in front of the number of
                              > the box inside, like this:
                              >
                              > Your Name
                              > Post Office's Address on Main Street #123
                              > City, State
                              >
                              > You'll get it and nobody but you and the post office will know it isn't
                              > a regular house.


                            • Daniel Nieves
                              I thought Id share this with the group on Residence   MILLER BROS. CO. v. MARYLAND, 347 U.S. 340 (1954) Thus, the Court has frequently held that domicile or
                              Message 14 of 25 , Jul 8, 2010
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                                I thought Id share this with the group on Residence
                                 

                                MILLER BROS. CO. v. MARYLAND, 347 U.S. 340 (1954)

                                Thus, the Court has frequently held that domicile or residence, more substantial than mere presence in transit or sojourn, is an adequate basis for taxation, including income, property, and death taxes. Since the Fourteenth Amendment makes one a citizen of the state wherein he resides, the fact of residence creates universally recognized reciprocal duties of protection by the state and of allegiance and support by the citizen. The latter obviously includes a duty to pay taxes, and their nature and measure is largely a political matter. Of course, the situs of property may tax it regardless of the citizenship, domicile or residence of the owner, the most obvious illustration being a tax on realty laid by the state in which the realty is located. Also, the keeping of tangible or intangible personalty within a state may give it a similar taxable situs there (sometimes called a business or commercial situs or domicile). Certain activities or transactions carried on within a state, such as the use and sale of property, may give jurisdiction to tax whomsoever engages therein, and the use of highways may subject the use to certain types of taxation. These cases overlap with those in which incorporation by a state or permission to do business there forms the basis for proportionate taxation of a company, including its franchise, capital, income and property. Recent cases in which a taxable sale does not clearly take place within the taxing state, elements of the transaction occurring in different states, have presented peculiar difficulties, as have those where the party liable for a use tax does not use the product within the taxing state. 



                                --- On Thu, 7/8/10, Roger Hattman <rogerhattman@...> wrote:

                                From: Roger Hattman <rogerhattman@...>
                                Subject: Re: [tips_and_tricks] I had to deliver Peter Hendrickson at noon today to Milan FCI.
                                To: tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Thursday, July 8, 2010, 4:24 AM

                                 
                                Funny interaction.
                                This verifies further what I have observed:  The computers will accept most any address.  The problem is usually the person, so just keep trying.
                                When I switched my alleged license after a fraudulent suspension to General Delivery (after years of registration at the same they still to switch my alleged license), I handed the clerk at an auto tag place (a private entity that has direct access to DMV computers) the following:  registration to General Delivery (GD), insurance (GD), an invoice from the county court for an alleged traffic infraction (General Post), and a hand signed letter from the head Licensing to a (different) general post addy (another separate story of corruption).  She looked at me with a look of panic.  
                                 
                                Me:"It is not a PO Box.  I know you cannot use PO Box."
                                Clerk:  "Well, I can try it."
                                 
                                Several minutes later she printed it all out.
                                Just be persistent.  Try different people.  I have to assume that these computers all work more or less the same and will accept most anything.  I should note that c/o addresses are also expressly forbidden, as well as PO Boxes. 
                                 
                                In addition to being an essential element for challenging jurisdiction, having a non residential address is a big plus for privacy.
                                 
                                My only concern is, how do you get a PMB without some street address or ID or something?  I love the ambush idea, though. 

                                 


                              • windandthestone
                                ... substantial than mere presence in transit or sojourn, is an adequate basis for ... Re Pete: I have read some of his books and postings, but did he ever
                                Message 15 of 25 , Jul 16, 2010
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                                  --- In tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com, Daniel Nieves <dannyruel@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I thought Id share this with the group on Residence
                                  >  
                                  > MILLER BROS. CO. v. MARYLAND, 347 U.S. 340 (1954)
                                  > Thus, the Court has frequently held that domicile or residence, more substantial than mere presence in transit or sojourn, is an adequate basis for >
                                  >

                                  Re Pete:  I have read some of his books and postings, but did he ever tell anyone that giving your employer a W-4 was VOLUNTARY!!  If you don't give one,  aren't you saying in effect, "I am not volunteering to be a "federal person" this year."    (See 26 CFR 31.3402(p))

                                  No W-4 means no SS# means no income reported, means no taxes -- but also means no Social Security maybe's and no federal workers compensation. 

                                  I have spent years reading both Title 26 Code (USC) and Federal Regulations (CFR).  What a difference between the two!!  There is no taxing regulations which support the income tax on "everyman's wages."  The CFR begins with stating that Section 1 imposes a tax on everyone, but never says "there is imposed upon ..."  - yet the more I read it, the crazier it gets! 

                                  Like this -->

                                  "26 CFR 1-1.1
                                  (a) General rule. (1) Section 1 of the Code imposes an income tax on the income of every individual who is a citizen or resident of the United States and .... [They talk about imposing a tax, but never do it!]

                                   (b) Citizens or residents of the United States liable to tax. In general, all citizens of the United States, wherever resident, and all resident alien individuals are liable to the income taxes imposed by the Code whether the income is received from sources within or without the United States. Pursuant to section 876, a nonresident alien individual who is a bona fide resident of a section 931 possession (as defined in §1.931–1(c)(1) of this chapter) or Puerto Rico during the entire taxable year is, except as provided in section 931 or 933 with respect to income from sources within such possessions, subject to taxation in the same manner as a resident alien individual. As to tax on nonresident alien individuals, see sections 871 and 877.

                                  (c) Who is a citizen. Every person born or naturalized in the United States and subject to its jurisdiction is a citizen. [Note: there are no commas in that sentence.]  For other rules governing the acquisition of citizenship, see chapters 1 and 2 of title III of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1401–1459). For rules governing loss of citizenship, see sections 349 to 357, inclusive, of such Act (8 U.S.C. 1481–1489), Schneider v. Rusk, (1964) 377 U.S. 163, and Rev. Rul. 70–506, C.B. 1970–2, 1. For rules pertaining to persons who are nationals but not citizens at birth, e.g., a person born in American Samoa, see section 308 of such Act (8 U.S.C. 1408). For special rules applicable to certain expatriates who have lost citizenship with a principal purpose of avoiding certain taxes, see section 877. A foreigner who has filed his declaration of intention of becoming a citizen but who has not yet been admitted to citizenship by a final order of a naturalization court is an alien.

                                  (d) Effective/applicability date. The second sentence of paragraph (b) of this section applies to taxable years ending after April 9, 2008."

                                  Okay folks, please tell my why section (d) is there????
                                • BOB GREGORY
                                  *In regard to the question, **Okay folks, please tell my why section (d) is there???? **after looking at the question and CFR section again, I believe I see
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Jul 19, 2010
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                                    In regard to the question, "Okay folks, please tell my why section (d) is there????" after looking at the question and CFR section again, I believe I see the problem.  The writer, windandthestone, highlighted the sentence beginning "In general, all citizens..." which is not really the second sentence of the paragraph but the first.  The second sentence begins "Persuant to section..."  I assume that the provision about nonresident aliens came into effect on April 9, 2008.

                                    On Sat, Jul 17, 2010 at 12:53 AM, windandthestone <mmgemmel@...> wrote:
                                     


                                    --- In tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com, Daniel Nieves <dannyruel@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I thought Id share this with the group on Residence
                                    >  

                                    > MILLER BROS. CO. v. MARYLAND, 347 U.S. 340 (1954)
                                    > Thus, the Court has frequently held that domicile or residence, more substantial than mere presence in transit or sojourn, is an adequate basis for >
                                    >

                                    Re Pete:  I have read some of his books and postings, but did he ever tell anyone that giving your employer a W-4 was VOLUNTARY!!  If you don't give one,  aren't you saying in effect, "I am not volunteering to be a "federal person" this year."    (See 26 CFR 31.3402(p))

                                    No W-4 means no SS# means no income reported, means no taxes -- but also means no Social Security maybe's and no federal workers compensation. 

                                    I have spent years reading both Title 26 Code (USC) and Federal Regulations (CFR).  What a difference between the two!!  There is no taxing regulations which support the income tax on "everyman's wages."  The CFR begins with stating that Section 1 imposes a tax on everyone, but never says "there is imposed upon ..."  - yet the more I read it, the crazier it gets! 

                                    Like this -->

                                    "26 CFR 1-1.1
                                    (a) General rule. (1) Section 1 of the Code imposes an income tax on the income of every individual who is a citizen or resident of the United States and .... [They talk about imposing a tax, but never do it!]

                                     (b) Citizens or residents of the United States liable to tax. In general, all citizens of the United States, wherever resident, and all resident alien individuals are liable to the income taxes imposed by the Code whether the income is received from sources within or without the United States. Pursuant to section 876, a nonresident alien individual who is a bona fide resident of a section 931 possession (as defined in §1.931–1(c)(1) of this chapter) or Puerto Rico during the entire taxable year is, except as provided in section 931 or 933 with respect to income from sources within such possessions, subject to taxation in the same manner as a resident alien individual. As to tax on nonresident alien individuals, see sections 871 and 877.

                                    (c) Who is a citizen. Every person born or naturalized in the United States and subject to its jurisdiction is a citizen. [Note: there are no commas in that sentence.]  For other rules governing the acquisition of citizenship, see chapters 1 and 2 of title III of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1401–1459). For rules governing loss of citizenship, see sections 349 to 357, inclusive, of such Act (8 U.S.C. 1481–1489), Schneider v. Rusk, (1964) 377 U.S. 163, and Rev. Rul. 70–506, C.B. 1970–2, 1. For rules pertaining to persons who are nationals but not citizens at birth, e.g., a person born in American Samoa, see section 308 of such Act (8 U.S.C. 1408). For special rules applicable to certain expatriates who have lost citizenship with a principal purpose of avoiding certain taxes, see section 877. A foreigner who has filed his declaration of intention of becoming a citizen but who has not yet been admitted to citizenship by a final order of a naturalization court is an alien.

                                    (d) Effective/applicability date. The second sentence of paragraph (b) of this section applies to taxable years ending after April 9, 2008."

                                    Okay folks, please tell my why section (d) is there????

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