Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Now cops need TRAINING to TESTIFY?

Expand Messages
  • Patrick M
    I guess they are now teaching cops HOW to SELL their STORY to the judge & jury. Michelle Santamaria, a former prosecutor in the Palm Beach County State
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 8, 2009
    • 0 Attachment

      I guess they are now teaching cops HOW to SELL their STORY to the judge & jury.

       

      Michelle Santamaria, a former prosecutor in the Palm Beach County State Attorney's Office, said she came up with the idea to start a company, called Testifying Made Simple, while working as a prosecutor. She left the job after securing the contract with the sheriff's office.

       

      "I loved being a prosecutor, but with the case load and the volume, I had very little time for family and friends," Santamaria said. "After about a year, I already let them know I was on the way out. I had had this seed planted from being a prosecutor."

      ...

      Bradshaw said, "We had several comments from different prosecutors saying your deputies just aren't doing well in court. They just haven't had the training. They don't get it in the police academy."

       

      http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/palm-beach/fl-commissioner-daughter-20091206,0,5627056.story

       

      COULD this end up being the RESULT?

       

      "So, officer, can you tell us about your participation in "Testifying Made Simple?"

       

      "Well yes counsel, I was student of the week 3 times." "In fact, you see me always looking at the judge and jury, and not at you when I testify? I learned that. Did you hear me chuckle a little when you asked me about your client's confession? That brings me closer to juror #3 who seems to like me and not you." Do I look threatening and agressive to you? That's because I have learned to be a bit more laid back. I also learned a new answer, it goes like this: "the answer is whatever is in the report." See that, I don't have to really answer your question or let the jury know the truth, that I really don't remember.

       

      http://criminaldefenseblog.blogspot.com/2009/12/former-prosecutors-side-business.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2FZfdp+%28Criminal+Defense%29

       

      I though courts were SUPPOSED to be about TRUTH & JUSTICE, and NOT PERSUASIVENESS & SALESMANSHIP.

       

      My bad.  I guess I’ve seen too many episodes of PERRY MASON.

       

      Patrick in California

       

      "It ain't what ya don't know that hurts ya. What really puts a hurtin' on ya is what ya knows for sure, that just ain't so." -- Uncle Remus

       

       

    • Frog Farmer
      ... If one lets them get that far, one best be ready for appeal too. ... It s safer for her as she has no oath requirement involved in anticipating her
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 10, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Patrick M wrote:

        > I guess they are now teaching cops HOW to SELL their STORY to the
        > judge & jury.

        If one lets them get that far, one best be ready for appeal too.

        > Michelle Santamaria, a former prosecutor in the Palm Beach County
        > State Attorney's Office, said she came up with the idea to start a
        > company, called Testifying Made Simple, while working as a prosecutor.
        > She left the job after securing the contract with the sheriff's
        > office.

        It's safer for her as she has no oath requirement involved in
        anticipating her paycheck.

        > "I loved being a prosecutor, but with the case load and the volume,

        And with the willingness of Californians to confess and cooperate in
        their own prosecutions, it was like shooting fish in a barrel...

        > Bradshaw said, "We had several comments from different prosecutors
        > saying your deputies just aren't doing well in court. They just
        > haven't had the training. They don't get it in the police academy."

        We used to expect English to be learned in the first few grades, but
        today it may never get done. At least we have the advantage that our
        people are slightly more articulate than the average person who makes it
        to trial.

        > "So, officer, can you tell us about your participation in "Testifying
        > Made Simple?"

        > I also learned a new answer, it goes like this: "the answer is
        > whatever is in the report." See that, I don't have to really answer
        > your question or let the jury know the truth, that I really don't
        > remember.

        Until I ask you, "Can you refresh our memory on that point...? What did
        the report say about that, as you recall?"

        Now I'm going to ask you, "how many hours of instruction have you
        received preparing you to testify here today?"

        "Have you ever heard the term 'testilying' before?"

        Regards,

        FF
      • bowsercity@acd.net
        Re TRAINING etc. A few years back Michael Moore had a television series called the awful TRUTH ; I think it lasted two years. The shows were later archived
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 10, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Re TRAINING etc.

          A few years back Michael Moore had a television series called "the awful
          TRUTH"; I think it lasted two years. The shows were later archived (2001)
          and put out into the commercial market place under that same title; you
          can probably find them at most book stores or your favorite movie outlet.

          To the point: Mr. Moore did an episode that is archived as Episode 8,
          Second Season, which is titled "Stop and Frisk Night". While comedic in
          nature, there are several sub-plots on this particular show that
          illustrate the sad state of affairs in the "law enforcement", "public
          defender", "plea bargain" and other "justice system" related businesses
          (yes, commercial enterprises).

          Hope you get a chance to view the episode (there are 11 other episodes in
          the Second Season collection).


          > Patrick M wrote:
          >
          >> I guess they are now teaching cops HOW to SELL their STORY to the
          >> judge & jury.
          >
          > If one lets them get that far, one best be ready for appeal too.
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.