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Rights for ever.

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  • Jerry Stanton
    Is there any one in this group that show me can one case that states you have no inalienable rights to your property if you are U.S citizen?. Jerry James
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 11, 2009
      Is there any one in this group that show me can one case that states you have no inalienable rights to your property if you are U.S citizen?. Jerry James Stanton
      limited by OUR UNALIENABLE
      Rights:
      Unalienable – A word denoting the condition of
      those things, the property in which cannot be
      lawfully transferred from one person to another.
      - Bouvier’s Law Dictionary (emphasis added)
      inalienable - that which cannot be given away
      or taken away. (ref. Declaration of Independence)
      – World Book Encyclopedia Dictionary 1965
      unalienable - that which cannot be given away
      or taken away; inalienable. (ref. Declaration of Independence)
      - World Book Encyclopedia Dictionary
      1965
      which must hold said Rights inviolate FOREVER
      (Northwest Ordinance (1787)) in perpetuum and
      beyond any reach of any vote of majority, legislature
      or judge:
      “The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw
      certain subjects from the vicissitudes of
      political controversy, to place them beyond the
      reach of majorities and officials and to establish
      them as legal principles to be applied by the
      courts. One's right to life,
      liberty, and property, to free speech, a free press,
      freedom of worship and assembly, and other
      fundamental rights may not be submitted to
      vote; they depend on the outcome of no elections."
      (emphasis added)
      West Virginia Board of Education v. Barnette,
      319 U.S. 624, 638 (1943)
      (Opinion, J. Jackson


    • dave
      You could probably find it in a case….but you really don’t need to. The term is described in written law for those who find themselves on [or make
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 11, 2009

        You could probably find it in a case….but you really don’t need to.

         

        The term is described in written law for those who find themselves on [or make agreement to be bound under] territory owned by/ceded to the United States of America. That territory collectively is known as the United States.

         

         Anything written is a form of limitation and not expansion. The term you use—inalienable—is one of expansion.

         

         

         

        From: tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jerry Stanton
        Sent: Wednesday, November 11, 2009 1:02 PM
        To: tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [tips_and_tricks] Rights for ever.

         

         

        Is there any one in this group that show me can one case that states you have no inalienable rights to your property if you are U.S citizen?. Jerry James Stanton
        limited by OUR UNALIENABLE
        Rights:
        Unalienable – A word denoting the condition of
        those things, the property in which cannot be
        lawfully transferred from one person to another.
        - Bouvier’s Law Dictionary (emphasis added)
        inalienable - that which cannot be given away
        or taken away. (ref. Declaration of Independence)
        – World Book Encyclopedia Dictionary 1965
        unalienable - that which cannot be given away
        or taken away; inalienable. (ref. Declaration of Independence)
        - World Book Encyclopedia Dictionary
        1965
        which must hold said Rights inviolate FOREVER
        (Northwest Ordinance (1787)) in perpetuum and
        beyond any reach of any vote of majority, legislature
        or judge:
        “The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw
        certain subjects from the vicissitudes of
        political controversy, to place them beyond the
        reach of majorities and officials and to establish
        them as legal principles to be applied by the
        courts. One's right to life,
        liberty, and property, to free speech, a free press,
        freedom of worship and assembly, and other
        fundamental rights may not be submitted to
        vote; they depend on the outcome of no elections."
        (emphasis added)
        West Virginia Board of Education v. Barnette,
        319 U.S. 624, 638 (1943)
        (Opinion, J. Jackson

         

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