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I am considering a radical step and looking for the downside...

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  • Mike
    I have a rather unique situation and considering claiming parens patriae... I recognize that I am a fourteenth amendment citizen of the United States of
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2009
      I have a rather unique situation and considering claiming  parens patriae...

      I recognize that I am a fourteenth amendment citizen of the United States of America and this makes the United States my Sovereign. Congress has passed numerous laws that protect me as a US Citizen, including portions of Title 26.

      I would like to claim  parens patriae and receive the protection guaranteed to me by Congress.

      parens patriae: A doctrine that grants the inherent power and authority of the state to protect persons who are legally unable to act on their own behalf. US citizens are "legally unable to act on their own behalf" in most, if not all, tax (Title 26) situations.

      parens patriae (paa-wrens pat-tree-eye) n. Latin for "father of his country," the term for the doctrine that the government is the ultimate guardian of all people under a disability...

      The doctrine of parens patriae has been expanded in the United States to permit the attorney general of a state to commence litigation for the benefit of state residents for federal antitrust violations (15 U.S.C.A. ยง 15c). This authority is intended to further the public trust, safeguard the general and economic welfare of a state's residents, protect residents from illegal practices, and assure that the benefits of federal law are not denied to the general population.

      "A 'civil right' is considered a right given and protected by law, and a person's enjoyment thereof is regulated entirely by the law that creates it." 82 CA 369. 373, 255, P 760.

      Hence 26 USC 7433 applies to US Citizens and the US attorney will represent litigants.

      "The persons declared to be citizens are, "All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof." The evident meaning of these last words is not merely subject in some respect or degree to the jurisdiction of the United States, but completely subject..." Elk v. Wilkins, 112 US 94, 101, 102 (1884)

      I would appreciate any feedback and arguments that point out the downside risks...

      Thank you,

      Mike
    • Frog Farmer
      ... I wonder how you came to that conclusion. It might be so (if we ignore that the amendment was never lawfully ratified as recognized by the court in Dyett
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 2, 2009
        Mike wrote:

        > I have a rather unique situation and considering claiming parens
        > patriae...
        >
        > I recognize that I am a fourteenth amendment citizen of the United
        > States of America and this makes the United States my Sovereign.

        I wonder how you came to that conclusion. It might be so (if we ignore
        that the amendment was never lawfully ratified as recognized by the
        court in Dyett vs. Turner, 439 Pacific 266 (1968), and the numerous
        other cites therein), but it isn't for me and I'd take offense if anyone
        tried to imply it was.

        > Congress has passed numerous laws that protect me as a US Citizen,
        > including portions of Title 26.

        I'm not a "resident" either.

        Controllers want people to admit to being of subject status and give
        them many ways to do it. To do it, people have to believe certain
        things that may not be true.

        I think that anyone who defends choosing a subject status for themselves
        cannot really have a concept of personal sovereignty.

        Anyway, it just shows there are two diametrically opposed groups, one
        for freedom and one for control.

        Regards,

        FF
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