Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

A Ticket / Bill of attainder

Expand Messages
  • Gary D
    Year 1828 BILL, n. [Sax. bit ; G. beil, an ax or hatchet ; D. byl ; Dan. bile ; W. bwyell ; Pers. A. A J bil, a mattock, or pick-ax, and a shovel.] A pick-ax,
    Message 1 of 2 , May 25, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Year 1828


      BILL, n. [Sax. bit ; G. beil, an ax or hatchet
      ; D. byl ; Dan. bile ; W. bwyell ; Pers.
      A. A J bil, a mattock, or pick-ax, and a
      shovel.] A pick-ax, or mattock ; a battle-ax ; an ax
      or hatchet with a crooked point.
      BILL, n. [Norm, bille, a label or note ; Fr.
      billet, bil; Arm. bilked; Sp. billete : It. biglietto,
      bulletta, bollettino. Tlie primary sense
      probably is a roll or folded paper, Sp. boleta,
      a billet, a ticket, and a pajier of tobacco,
      coinciding with bola, a ball ; or it
      is from cutting off, and signifies a piece.]

      1. In law, a declaration in writing, expressing
      some wrong the complainant has suffered
      from the defendant, or a fault committed
      by some person against a law. It
      contains the fact complained of, the damage
      sustained, and a petition or process
      against the defendant for redress. It is
      used both in civil and criminal cases.
      In Scots laiv, every summary application
      in writing, by way of petition to the
      court of session, is called a bill. Encyc.

      2. In law and in commerce, in England, an
      obligation or security given for money
      under the hand, and sometimes the seal
      of the debtor, without a condition or forfeiture
      for non-payment. In the latter
      circumstance, it differs from a Ijond. In
      the United States, this species of security
      is usually called a note, a note of hand, or
      a promissory note.

      3. A form or draft of a law, presented to a
      legislature, but not enacted. In some cases,
      statutes are called bills ; but usually
      they are qualified by some description, as
      a bill of attainder.

      4. A paper written or printed, and posted ui
      some public place, advertising the proposed
      sale of goods, or particular things; an
      advertisement posted.
      5. An account of goods sold or delivered,
      services rendered or work done, with the
      price or value annexed to each article.
      6. Any written paper, containing a statement
      of particulars ; as a bill of charges
      or expenditures ; a physician's bill of prescriptions
      ; a bill of fare or provisions,
      &c.
      7. A bill of exchange is an order drawn on a
      person, in a distant place, requesting or
      directing him to pay money to some person
      assigned by the drawer, or to his order,
      in consideration of the same sum received
      by the drawer. Bills of exchange
      are either foreign or inland ; foreign, wlien
      drawn by a person in one country upon
      one residing in another ; inland, when
      both the drawer and drawee reside Ln the
      same country. The person who draws
      the bill is called the drawer ; the person
      on wliom the request or demand is made,
      is called the drawee ; and the person to
      whom the money is directed to be paid,
      is called the payee.


      Taken from

      AMERICAN DICTIONARY
      OF THE *
      *
      *
      ENGLISH LANGUAGE^
      INTENDED TO EXHIBIT,
      I. The origin, affinities and primary signification of English words, as far as they have been ascertained.
      II. The genuine orthography and pronunciation of words, according to general usage, or to just principles of ANALOoy.
      III. Accurate and discriminating definitions, with numerous authorities and illustrations.
      TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED,
      AN INTRODUCTORY DISSERTATION
      ON THE
      ORIGIN, HISTORY AND CONNECTION OF THE
      LANGUAGES OF WESTERN ASIA AND OF EUROPE,
      AND A CONCISE GRAMMAR
      OF THE "
      ^--^ ENGLISH LANGUAGE. fe '»ro
      vV.
      ^. ^ f 0.^^^—"
      \
      BY NOAH WEBSTER, LL. D.
      IN T^VO VOIiUIWES.
      VOL. I.
      He tliat wishes to be counted among the benefactors of posterity, must add, by his own toil, to the acquisitions of his ancestors.—i{<imi/er.
      NEW YORK:
      PUBLISHED BY S. CONVERSE.
      PRINTED Br HEZEKIAH HOWE—NEW HAVEN.
      1828.
    • BOB GREGORY
      *From Bouvier s Law Dictionary, 1856*: *BILL OF ATTAINDER*, legislation, punishment. An act of the legislature by which one or more persons are declared to be
      Message 2 of 2 , May 26, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, 1856:

        BILL OF ATTAINDER, legislation, punishment. An act of the legislature by which one or more persons are declared to be attainted, and their property confiscated.

        2. The Constitution of the United States declares that no state shall pass any bill of attainder.

        3. During the revolutionary war, bills of attainder, and ox post facto acts of confiscation, were passed to a wide extent. The evils resulting from them, in times of more cool reflection, were discovered to have far outweighed any imagined good. Story on Const. §1367. Vide Attainder; Bill of Pains and Penalties.


        Here is a link for Bouvier's Law Dictionary of 1856 online:   http://www.constitution.org/bouv/bouvier.htm



        On Mon, May 25, 2009 at 8:22 PM, Gary D <garytrust@...> wrote:


        Year 1828



        3. A form or draft of a law, presented to a
        legislature, but not enacted. In some cases,
        statutes are called bills ; but usually
        they are qualified by some description, as
        a bill of attainder.

        .


      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.