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Re: [tips_and_tricks] "Living Document" Constitution

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  • Richard Gieser
    Nice post, Virgil. I must, however, take issue with Point No. 2. If our ancestors thought Republican governments like ours were good they would not have said
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 3, 2008
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      Nice post, Virgil. I must, however, take issue with Point No. 2. If our ancestors thought Republican governments like ours were good they would not have said government is a necessary evil that must be kept in chains. I think that was Thomas Jefferson.
      I am not suggesting that we don't have the best form of government currently on the planet; only that it is the lesser of evils and the stronger the chains, the better off we are.
       
      Richard Gieser


      You rock. That's why Blockbuster's offering you one month of Blockbuster Total Access, No Cost.
    • macwildstar
      ... From: Richard Gieser Subject: Re: [tips_and_tricks] Living Document Constitution Nice post, Virgil. I must, however, take issue with Point No. 2. If our
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 3, 2008
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        ----- Original Message -----
        Subject: Re: [tips_and_tricks] "Living Document" Constitution

        Nice post, Virgil. I must, however, take issue with Point No. 2. If our ancestors thought Republican governments like ours were good they would not have said government is a necessary evil that must be kept in chains. I think that was Thomas Jefferson.
        I am not suggesting that we don't have the best form of government currently on the planet; only that it is the lesser of evils and the stronger the chains, the better off we are.
         
        Richard Gieser

         

        Richard, (and all) I question if we do have strong enough chains. The 7th amendment says that all controversies over 21 dollars, are entitled to a jury trial for determination. Yet we now have 2 government entities that can take your pay or property without a court order - the IRS and the US Dept of Education.

        I believe both are a direct violation of various amendments, which are by their design, constraints on government power.

         

      • Virgil Cooper
        Hello Richard Geiser and others on this list, There is plenty of evidence that the Founding Fathers believed they were fulfilling prophesies and establishing
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 4, 2008
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        • Frog Farmer
          ... I can accept the changes if done according to the rules. If they do not care enough to do it right, then it didn t get done, no matter how many wish it
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 4, 2008
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            Virgil Cooper wrote:

            > There has been a long-term running battle between
            > those who understand the U.S. Constitution as being
            > grounded in "Original Intent" of the Founders
            > vs. those who view the Constitution as a "Living
            > Document" subject to alteration and modification
            > according to the changing times.

            I can accept the changes if done according to the rules. If they do not
            care enough to do it right, then it didn't get done, no matter how many
            wish it had been. I can explain how the 14th, 16th and 17th never
            really got done. For me, they are not "amendments" but wishful thinking
            on the part of some people. Some people gloss over rule violations when
            it suits them. Would they like to trade, mine for theirs?

            I live in a special place. Nobody wants to rock the boat.

            Regards,

            FF
          • BOB GREGORY
            The ending ment on the word government is similar to or related to ing. The endings ent (or minor variants) in French and ando in Spanish have been
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 4, 2008
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              The ending "ment" on the word government is similar to or related to "ing."  The endings "ent" (or minor variants) in French and "ando" in Spanish have been adopted with certain words in English.  The French word for government is "gouvernement."

              Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary

              -ment

              -ment\, [F. -ment, L. -mentum.] A suffix denoting that which does a thing; an act or process; the result of an act or process; state or condition; as, aliment, that which nourishes, ornament, increment; fragment, piece broken, segment; abridgment, act of abridging, imprisonment, movement, adjournment; amazement, state of being amazed, astonishment. Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.

              ========================

              pingmyemail wrote:

              For all to consider:

              De constructing the word "Government"

              govern; a: to control, direct, or strongly influence the actions and
              conduct of b: to exert a determining or guiding influence in or over.

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