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Re: Corporations v. Citizens

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  • Frog Farmer
    ... That s right! ... A corporation cannot vote at the polls, or plead the fifth, as just two examples! ... I love this quote and use it often! ... If only the
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 6, 2008
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      rebel382003 wrote:

      > A CORPORATION DOES NOT HAVE THE SAME LEGAL STATUS AS A CITIZEN

      That's right!

      > It is submitted that the case cited may grant the status of an
      > individual to the corporation only for the issue at bar. It is not a
      > statement that there is no difference between a corporation and of a
      > citizen. But then again, it was not the words of the court.

      A corporation cannot vote at the polls, or plead the fifth, as just two
      examples!

      > I offer the following two lengthy paragraphs from Hale v Henkel, 201
      > US 43 (1906), as a clear and definitive declaration of legal
      > differences between the two forms:

      I love this quote and use it often!

      > "The individual may stand upon his constitutional
      > rights as a citizen. He is entitled to carry on
      > his private business in his own way. His power to
      > contract is unlimited. He owes no duty to the state
      > or to his neighbors to divulge his business, or to
      > open his doors to an investigation, so far as it may
      > tend to criminate him. He owes no such duty to the
      > state, since he receives nothing therefrom, beyond
      > the protection of his life and property. His rights
      > are such as existed by the law of the land long
      > antecedent to the organization of the state,
      > and can only be taken from him by due process of law,
      > and in accordance with the Constitution. Among his
      > rights are a refusal to incriminate
      > himself, and the immunity of himself and his property
      > from arrest or seizure except under a warrant of the
      > law. He owes nothing to the
      > public so long as he does not trespass upon their rights."

      If only the American people could know these facts during every moment
      of their waking day, and act upon them with confidence!

      > "Upon the other hand, the corporation is a creature of
      > the state. It is presumed to be incorporated for the
      > benefit of the public.

      It may not be, however, and when checked, many did not follow through on
      all the necessary steps in the process of incorporation. Only those
      with a stake or something to lose ever check that aspect out, and most
      of those people don't take the trouble either, thinking, "I saw their ad
      on TV; they MUST be legitimate!" Hahahaha!

      > It receives certain special privileges and franchises,

      As opposed to rights.

      > and holds them subject to the laws of the state and the
      > limitations of its charter.

      Unlike my rights!

      > Its powers are limited by law.

      My rights are too innumerable to be covered by law. As proof, just look
      at all the next year's legislation that will be written in attempts to
      take more of them away.

      > It can make no contract not authorized by its
      > charter.

      But who cares about THAT!? Hahahaha! People get whatever they permit.

      > Its rights to [201 U.S. 43, 75] act as a corporation
      > are only preserved to it so long as it obeys the laws
      > of its creation.

      Or so long as they go violating them unnoticed or unopposed.

      > There is a reserved right in the legislature to
      > investigate its contracts and find out whether it
      > has exceeded its powers. It would be a strange
      > anomaly to hold that a state, having chartered a
      > corporation to make use of certain franchises,
      > could not, in the exercise of its
      > sovereignty, inquire how these franchises had been
      > employed, and whether they had been abused, and
      > demand the production of the
      > corporate books and papers for that purpose. " id, 74-75.
      >

      "There is a reserved right in the toolbox of a Frog Farmer to
      investigate his contracts and find out whether anyone contending against
      him has exceeded their powers. It would be a strange anomaly to hold
      that a state citizen, having chartered a procedure (constitution) for
      elevating neighbors to officers to make use of certain franchises and
      powers, could not, in the exercise of his sovereignty, inquire how these
      franchises had been obtained and employed, and whether they had been
      abused, and demand the production of the corporate books and papers for
      that purpose. (certified copies of oaths of office and other required
      bona fide documentation required to be on file by law."
      - 1 FF 007; 2 PAM 51; MacDonald v. County of Sonoma.

      > Citizens have rights secured by the Constitution; corporations have
      > privileges granted by legislators and judges.

      This is why, if it's not a life-threatening emergency that requires the
      immediate orders of a magistrate to subdue a "just following orders"
      type goon, a "formal" "docketed" "administrative hearing" "on the
      record" is the preferable course of action (short of forgetting the
      whole thing and everyone going home), scheduled for the convenience of
      all parties to minimize wasted time and resources, and at that meeting,
      I will take the First Step of letting the record reflect my human nature
      and the SHEER IMPOSSIBILITY of mistaking me in any way to be a
      corporation or of partaking in any corporate privileges. This is a
      presumption rarely ever challenged (and rarely ever true for most
      Americans anymore). Once it has been done, one has a lot more leverage
      over his opponents, who most likely cannot rationally discuss any
      issues.

      "Don't ever change, people,
      Even if you can.
      You are your own best toy to play with;
      remote control hands
      Made for each other, made in Japan.
      Woman with a greasy heart,
      automatic man,
      Don't ever change, people,
      your face will hit the fan.
      Don't ever change, people,
      even if you can.
      Don't change before the empire falls;
      You'll laugh so hard you'll crack the walls"

      - Grace Slick, "Greasy Heart"

      Regards,

      FF
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