Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: New IRS 'frivolous' positions subject to $5000 fine

Expand Messages
  • jjmozingo2002
    Wow, what a money maker for the government. OH wait, the IRS isn t an agency of the government, that s right. Anyway, according to the mysterious computer at
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 20, 2007
      Wow, what a money maker for the government. OH wait, the IRS isn't an
      agency of the government, that's right.

      Anyway, according to the mysterious computer at the irs, everything
      that requires them to obey the law is frivolous.

      Anything that they don't feel like addressing is frivolous.

      Anything that exposes their fraud is frivolous.

      Anything that shows they have wrongly applied the law is frivolous.

      Anything short of handing over your money with no questions asked is
      frivolous.

      Who voted on the new $5000 frivolous penalty I wonder. I don't recall
      that being on the floor of the senate or house of representatives.
      Who would draw up such a bill in the first place and what is the
      reasoning I wonder.

      I seem to remember a guy named Pete Hendrickson who recently backed
      the criminals into a corner by writing a book showing people what the
      law actually says and how it is lawfully suppose to be applied. Of
      course the income tax is not a tax on income but a tax on taxable
      activities and of course that is considered frivolous.

      Now all of the sudden this new $5000 penalty comes out. What a
      strange coincidence.

      It sure would be great if that frivolous penalty went the other way.

      Oh wait, there is RICO.


      --- In tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry Fleischner" <gmf@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Internal Revenue Bulletin: 2007-14
      > April 2, 2007
      >
      > Notice 2007-30
      > Frivolous Positions
      >
      > Numbers show item # out of a list of 40
      >
      > 12. In a transaction using gold and silver coins, the value of the
      coins is
      > excluded from income or the amount realized in the transaction is
      the face
      > value of the coins and not their fair market value for purposes of
      determining
      > taxable income.
      >
      > 24. An IRS Form 23C, Assessment Certificate — Summary Record of
      Assessments,
      > is an invalid record of assessment for purposes of section 6203 and
      Treas.
      > Reg. § 301.6203-1, the Form 23C must be personally signed by the
      Secretary of
      > the Treasury for an assessment to be valid, the Service must provide
      a copy of
      > the Form 23C to a taxpayer if requested before taking collection
      action, or
      > similar arguments described as frivolous in Rev. Rul. 2007-21,
      2007-14 I.R.B.
      >
      >
      >
      > The principal author of this notice is the Office of Associate Chief
      Counsel
      > (Procedure & Administration). For further information, contact the
      Office of
      > Associate Chief Counsel (Procedure & Administration), Administrative
      > Provisions & Judicial Practice Division, Branch 2, at (202) 622-4940.
      >
    • Jerry Fleischner
      The creator of frivolous positions appears to be the Office of Associate Chief Counsel (Procedure & Administration). Call (202) 622-4940 to discuss this with
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 22, 2007
        The creator of "frivolous positions" appears to be the Office of Associate
        Chief Counsel (Procedure & Administration). Call (202) 622-4940 to discuss
        this with one of its attorneys.

        A full list of recent 'frivolous positions is at:

        http://www.irs.gov/irb/2007-14_IRB/ar20.html


        Jerry Fleischner


        "jjmozingo2002" <jjmozingo@...> wrote

        > Wow, what a money maker for the government. OH wait, the IRS isn't an
        agency of the government, that's right.
        >
        > Anyway, according to the mysterious computer at the irs, everything that
        requires them to obey the law is frivolous.
      • Frog Farmer
        ... I receive rolls of nickels every day. Each one has a face value of $2. The government just passed a law saying you cannot melt nickels for their fair
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 23, 2007
          > > 12. In a transaction using gold and silver coins, the value of the
          > coins is
          > > excluded from income or the amount realized in the transaction is
          > the face
          > > value of the coins and not their fair market value for purposes of
          > determining
          > > taxable income.

          I receive rolls of nickels every day. Each one has a face value of $2.

          The government just passed a law saying you cannot melt nickels for
          their fair market value. They claim it costs ten cents to make each
          nickel token, giving each roll a fair market value of $4.

          So, assuming I owe income tax on my nickels, how would they have me
          report them in order not to appear too frivolous? I need to know.

          Regards,

          FF
        • jjmozingo2002
          FF, It s easy. It s all frivolous. Just hand over whatever the computer tells you like a good little slave. Don t ask any questions.....Questions are
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 24, 2007
            FF,

            It's easy. It's all frivolous.

            Just hand over whatever the computer tells you like a good little slave.

            Don't ask any questions.....Questions are frivolous.

            Don't quote the code....The code is frivolous.

            The only thing that isn't frivolous is handing over what the computer
            tells you to hand over.

            Resistance is frivolous.

            --- In tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com, "Frog Farmer" <frogfrmr@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > > > 12. In a transaction using gold and silver coins, the value of the
            > > coins is
            > > > excluded from income or the amount realized in the transaction is
            > > the face
            > > > value of the coins and not their fair market value for purposes of
            > > determining
            > > > taxable income.
            >
            > I receive rolls of nickels every day. Each one has a face value of $2.
            >
            > The government just passed a law saying you cannot melt nickels for
            > their fair market value. They claim it costs ten cents to make each
            > nickel token, giving each roll a fair market value of $4.
            >
            > So, assuming I owe income tax on my nickels, how would they have me
            > report them in order not to appear too frivolous? I need to know.
            >
            > Regards,
            >
            > FF
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.