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RE: [tips_and_tricks] Re: A few more quotes explaining "fictions of law"

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  • Frog Farmer
    ... Interesting. If I were doing it, and I d never, it would say, Federal Reserve Notes , because there are at least three things that fit that one homonym,
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 16, 2007
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      mn_chicago wrote:

      > Every check I receive for compensation as an
      > independent contractor is endorsed:
      >
      > "Exchanged for nonredeemable federal reserve notes.
      > Without prejudice."
      >
      > No signature.

      Interesting. If I were doing it, and I'd never, it would say, "Federal
      Reserve Notes", because there are at least three things that fit that
      one homonym, like there are different things that correspond to the
      homonym, "United States". When one speaks, one may have to specify the
      meaning one intends for a homonym people could fit to different
      significant meanings. When one writes, one may have to pay strict
      attention to capitalization and other hints in context. As a
      progressing gambler, I'd be willing to bet that the documents you
      referred to do not come in "one dollar" or "five dollar" denominations,
      but more likely exist in denominations of 6 or more figures.

      > Taxes can only be assessed on income. The IRS
      > cannot tax debt, as debt is not income.

      But debt satisfied is considered income. At least, that's what I hear.
      Not being a corporado, I really wouldn't know. I know what I eat is not
      income even though it comes in. And just because something comes out
      does not mean I'm operating a production facility.

      > Most everyone who cashes a check and gets worthless
      > FRNs in return is tacitly admitting receipt of
      > dollars, which are taxable.

      Yup.

      > I do not otherwise deal in checks, or else I would
      > repeat the same procedure.

      I used to do as you do. Then I decided any participation in the scheme
      was to my own detriment. If anyone wants me or my labor or my
      productive capacity, they can take the time to get acquainted with a
      local coin dealer. Or they could order bags of nickel tokens (tokens
      currently minted representing 5 cents, yet not BEING 5 cents in
      themselves, and yet the mint claims it costs 10 real cents to produce
      each one!!) and then I could really clean up as soon as nickels are
      discontinued.

      > One time last spring, I wanted to cash two checks
      > for $5,000 each at a bank. The teller required
      > identification and a fingerprint on the check.
      > I said, "Absolutely not! My fingerprints are my
      > property, and that is backed up by the supreme
      > Court in Davis v Mississippi. You cannot require
      > them from me. Get your legal counsel on the phone."

      If it ever came to it, I'd use the Davis case to keep the cops from
      getting my fingerprints. They are property, and mine come with a high
      price, not set by the market, but by my own sense of values. If
      someone steals them from me, it would be unearned income to them,
      wouldn't it? Should I file a 1099 on them for the value? I don't know.

      > While nervous phone calls were being made by two
      > managers, I called the maker of the checks to
      > come over and get them cashed on his say so. He did.

      I once had a similar scene at a Bank of America many years ago before I
      quit the central banking system. I was loud and let people know that
      their instructions over their signature meant nothing to BofA, and I had
      them call the check's maker and they dealt with it over the phone with a
      few questions from him to which I gave satisfactory answers as my
      identification.

      > The bank complied immediately, not even asking for
      > ID.

      Yeah, that's what happened.

      > The rest of the tellers were giving me glances
      > from the sides of their eyes, watching to see what
      > else I might do.

      And when they refused to give me all real dollars or even all token
      coins, I made them produce a list of all the denominations and serial
      numbers of the bills and sign it so later I could not be accused of
      having stolen cash or drug money and have it seized. Oh, they hated
      that, but they did it, and it took over half an hour.

      > I otherwise cash all checks at a currency exchange,
      > never letting any bank into my limited financial
      > affairs, and there are no questions asked on my
      > endorsement.

      When I was in your state I used a currency exchange and was happy with
      the benefits of the slight charges.

      > It may cost me $18 to $25 to cash a check, but such
      > a small price to pay for privacy and not receiving
      > "dollars."

      Ohhh, that's too much, and not at all worth it! There are better ways
      to deal with unavoidable checks, if there is such a thing.

      > I also use a currency exchange to remit funds when
      > necessary. No banking paper trail there, either.

      I have a little network of people I deal with, and some deal in
      imaginary credit (rendering them susceptible to government armed forces
      in the extreme situation) and some do not. The ones who do, like you,
      but less careful than you, are glad to accept and convert a check made
      out to them! So if Joe can only come up with a check, and I decide to
      work for him anyway, I'll have him make the check out to Mary, who
      provides me other services. That way I don't have to sign anything or
      have a confrontation or pay an exorbitant fee.

      Regards,

      FF
    • mobinem@aol.com
      I recycle checks, so far, about 3 years or so it has always worked. When I am given a check I sign the back pay to account # XXXXXXX and send the check to a
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 16, 2007
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        I recycle checks, so far, about 3 years or so it has always worked. When I am given a check I sign the back pay to account # XXXXXXX and send the check to a vendor like the electric company, water company or other bill. It may take up to 5 days for it to clear but they have all cleared. To date, not one issue, no calls, no letters, no denials, etc.
        No paper trail either. I never cashed the check and never received any bank notes or any other notes. I don't think electricity is income, besides I don't use electricity my toaster does. A few times I have wound up over paying and the remainder sits there as a credit.
        The lady that taught me this has done it a lot longer than me and says she has never had an issue.
        Just thought you may want to try it.
         


        John-Chester: Stuart: sovereign without subjects

        623-206-4339
        mobinem@...
        c/o postal service location
        21001 N. Tatum Blvd. Suite 1630472
        Phoenix, Arizona republic cf 85050 cf




        See what's new at AOL.com and Make AOL Your Homepage.
      • BOB GREGORY
        One putative tax guru advocates accepting checks and then using them to pay utility bills, etc. by mail. If the amount is a bit over the bill amount, it shows
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 16, 2007
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          One putative tax guru advocates accepting checks and then using them to pay utility bills, etc. by mail.  If the amount is a bit over the bill amount, it shows as a credit for the following bill.

          Frog Farmer wrote:



          mn_chicago wrote:

          > Every check I receive for compensation as an
          > independent contractor is endorsed:
          >
          > "Exchanged for nonredeemable federal reserve notes.
          > Without prejudice."
          >
          > No signature.


        • rebel382003
          ... My first reaction was that sovereign citizen would be redundant rather than an oxymoron, but looking for support, I opened Webster s which included: A
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 16, 2007
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            Patrick in California (paradoxmagnus) has queried if:

            >> CLAIMING to be a "sovereign citizen" is an OXYMORON.

            >> NOTICE that all the quotes regarding SOVEREIGNTY refer to the
            >> People and NOT "citizens".

            My first reaction was that "sovereign citizen" would be redundant
            rather than an oxymoron, but looking for support, I opened Webster's
            which included:

            "A native or naturalized person owing allegiance to, and entitled to
            protection from, a government." To be candid, the dictionary
            suggested SUBJECT for comparison. If `subject' is a complete and
            exclusive synonym, "sovereign citizen" would then be an oxymoron.

            "Owning allegiance to a government" would suggest an inferior,
            feudal subject, while "entitled to protection" would appear to be
            position where the government owes something to a superior
            individual.

            Under "CITIZENSHIP," the dictionary includes "The status of a
            citizen, with its rights, privileges, and duties." If a citizen
            receives privileges, it would appear the individual is an inferior
            subject. If a citizen maintains rights, it would appear the
            individual is in a position of authority and sovereignty.

            In conclusion, perhaps "citizen" might have a dual application
            depending upon the political climate. In an oppressive, all-
            powerful government, the citizen would be a servile subject, while
            in a Republic the citizen would be a sovereign individual.

            Would it be fair to suggest a "sovereign citizen" who lives in Cuba
            would be an oxymoron while the term applied to a citizen of the
            United States would be an idealistic illusion ??

            Reb
          • Scott
            I have something to add after reading these posts from individuals not wanting records of receiving FRN s. Guess what, do you have utilities hooked up to your
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 18, 2007
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              I have something to add after reading these posts from individuals not
              wanting records of receiving FRN's. Guess what, do you have utilities
              hooked up to your domocile? The last i heard, utiltiy companies don't
              accept gold and silver as a form of payment. This being said, the fed.
              gov. has records that you have used and do use FRN's that they can
              subpeona from the state.
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