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RE: [tips_and_tricks] (response to FF's reply) RE: Collection

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  • lee stortz
    My past research, many years ago, has shown me that each Town that becomes a City has indeed been granted municipal corporation status by the State of
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 27, 2007
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      My past research, many years ago, has shown me that each Town that becomes a City has indeed been granted municipal corporation status by the State of __________.  We had a small city here in Washington state give up its corporate charter because it became to expensive to maintain.  Giving up the corporate status meant that it no longer needed to pay the corporate franchise fee to the State of Washington, a corporation used by Washington state.  I have a court case where the Federal Judge stated that that "State" was "one of ours".  Does that mean that the state also pays a franchise fee to the Federal Government?  or to someone or something (what), if so, does that mean the "it" pays a franchise fee to a higher entity?  Would that be the Treasurer of or for the Holy See?  Read the Treaty of Paris.
       
      For a copy of the Corporate Charter, you can start by asking the court clerk for one, it will detail the powers granted to the City by the State of _________.   The City must be able to provide you with one upon request.  The civil servants and police have a problem if it cannot.  Nothing personal,  just business.   Go get'em!!!
       

      Frog Farmer <frogfrmr@...> wrote:


      RotorRider [mailto:RotorRider@comcast. net] wrote:
      > Nowhere could any paperwork be found in any and all of the town
      > offices that would prove
      > that the town was a corporation. The official; town seal states that
      > it is a corporation.
      > The Town Clerk, Town Manager, Town Archivist, Town Library, Town
      > Historian, etc, etc
      > all stated that they believed that the town was incorporated and they
      > all knew that
      > the town functioned and acted as if incorporated but no paperwork, new
      > or old
      > could be produced to prove it. No minutes of corporate meetings,
      > nothing!
      > I even got a notarized statement from the town clerk on town
      > stationary stating that
      > they had searched and could not find paperwork relative to proving
      > corporate status.
      >
      > Would this be an easy win in a legal battle between you and the
      > fraudulent corporation? ???

      Would it be an easy win between you and a unicorn, or Santa Claus?

      Who gets to speak for a non-corporation? Who lets them?

      Welcome to the real world.

      Regards,

      FF


    • Michael Noonan
      ... You may have to check the statutes. As I recall, and I was not paying close attention, at least in Ilinois, if a town or some form of municipality has
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 28, 2007
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        --- RotorRider <RotorRider@...> wrote:

        > Nowhere could any paperwork be found in any and all
        > of the town offices that would prove
        > that the town was a corporation. The official; town
        > seal states that it is a corporation.
        > The Town Clerk, Town Manager, Town Archivist, Town
        > Library, Town Historian, etc, etc
        > all stated that they believed that the town was
        > incorporated and they all knew that
        > the town functioned and acted as if incorporated but
        > no paperwork, new or old
        > could be produced to prove it. No minutes of
        > corporate meetings, nothing!


        You may have to check the statutes. As I recall, and
        I was not paying close attention, at least in Ilinois,
        if a town or some form of municipality has been in
        existence for at least 20 years, or some number, then
        their corporate status cannot be challenged.

        FWIW.

        mn



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      • Jason C Muhammad
        You may have to check the statutes. As I recall, and I was not paying close attention, at least in Ilinois, if a town or some form of municipality has been
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 28, 2007
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          "You may have to check the statutes. As I recall, and
          I was not paying close attention, at least in Ilinois,
          if a town or some form of municipality has been in
          existence for at least 20 years, or some number, then
          their corporate status cannot be challenged."

          Actually in Illinois it's THREE years!

          (735 ILCS 5/18‑104) (from Ch. 110, par. 18‑104)
              Sec. 18‑104. Limitation. No action shall be brought by quo warranto, or otherwise, questioning the legality of the organization of any county, city, village, incorporated town, township, school district, park district, road district, drainage district, sanitary district, authority or any other municipal corporation or political subdivision in the State of Illinois after such municipal corporation or political subdivision has been in de facto existence for a period of 3 years.
          (Source: P.A. 82‑280.)


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