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Building permit & property taxes

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  • delaybox
    I am building a warehouse on my property & want to do it without getting a building permit. does anyone know the proceedure? Also can anyone help about how to
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 3, 2006
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      I am building a warehouse on my property & want to do it without
      getting a building permit. does anyone know the proceedure?

      Also can anyone help about how to go about not paying property taxes?

      Thank you.

      Bob
    • The Handyman
      Go to www.landrights.com Mr. Munro build a garage and I used his stuff. It worked. ... From: delaybox To: tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday,
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 3, 2006
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        Go to www.landrights.com  Mr. Munro build a garage and I used his stuff.  It worked.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: delaybox
        Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2006 1:05 PM
        Subject: [tips_and_tricks] Building permit & property taxes

        I am building a warehouse on my property & want to do it without
        getting a building permit. does anyone know the proceedure?

        Also can anyone help about how to go about not paying property taxes?

        Thank you.

        Bob

      • Frog Farmer
        ... Use portable airplane hangars. Or use all screws. The key is to make it temporary versus permanent . Humans are temporary; corporations are permanent.
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 3, 2006
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          On Aug 3, 2006, at 11:05 AM, delaybox wrote:

          > I am building a warehouse on my property & want to do it without
          > getting a building permit. does anyone know the proceedure?

          Use portable airplane hangars. Or use all screws. The key is to make
          it "temporary" versus "permanent".

          Humans are temporary; corporations are permanent. Any temporary hangar
          will outlast any human, unless a tornado or bomb destroys it.

          > Also can anyone help about how to go about not paying property taxes?

          Pay off all indebtedness of the property when you first acquire a
          property. Most people do not pay off the bonded indebtedness when they
          buy a property - they use small print in the contract to assume the
          debt from the former owner and to defer payment until later, by way of
          the property taxes.
        • RotorRider
          Regarding NO building permit, private home & private property rights, I thought that this may be of interest to you and the rest of the group. Below is an
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 3, 2006
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            Regarding NO building permit, private home & private property rights, I thought that this may be of interest to you and the rest of the group.  Below is an email from an online legal service that helped advise me during my fight against TOWN OF IPSWICH.  There are several excerpts from actual Massachusetts Supreme Court case cites that state (in legalese) that a private home is NOT a building for purposes of building codes.  These were part of my argument in court.  They were never ruled on because I had also challenged jurisdiction and the judge, not wanting to set a precedent ("swept it under the rug") sat on it for two years and never made any ruling.  I guess you could say I won by inaction of the court.  To this day (3 years) the town agents/administrators (actors) have never set foot on my private propertyand I've done substantial construction with NO BLDG PERMIT.  There are probably similar legal writings in the statutes of most states regarding this "administrative law" which should only apply to the administration (the municipality) not private land and private citizens.
             
            Best regards,
             
            RotorRider
            ***********************************************************************************
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: O L S
            Subject: private home

             

            We have researched the laws of Massachusetts and Mass requires ALL buildings and ALL remodeling or additions to be inspected by the county or Commonwealth building inspectors – there are no exceptions.

             

            However,  a building is defined as a “public building” open to the public - it does not mean that a private home is a building. Therefore, yours and all other homes are exempt from these inspections or permits.  This agrees with common sense in that because it is your land – you are free to do whatever you want to “your property” as long as you do not cause harm to others.

             

            Here is an excerpt from a recent MASS Supreme Court decision that rules this very issue to be true:

             

            "The owner . . . being the party in control, of a place of assembly, theatre, special hall, public hall, factory, workshop, manufacturing establishment or building shall comply with the provisions of . . . the state building code relative thereto, and such person shall be liable to any person injured for all damages caused by a violation of any of said provisions."

             

            "We [Mass Supreme Ct] have already concluded that the statute does not apply to a single-family house. See Eakin, (1998). In that case, we said that the Legislature could not have intended the word "building" in the statute, "which appears in a series with other, more specific words ('assembly, theatre, special hall, public hall, factory, workshop, manufacturing establishment') to mean any and every structure." Id. See Santos (1996). We proceed from that point to determine whether the word "building" encompasses an owner-occupied family home."

             

            In considering the language of the statute, the doctrine of ejusdem generis is applicable: "Where general words follow specific words in a statutory enumeration, the general words are construed to embrace only objects similar in nature to those objects enumerated by the preceding specific words." 2A N.J. Singer, Sutherland Statutory Construction á47.17, at 273-274 (6th ed. rev. 2000). See Powers n.8 (1984).

             

            The doctrine is most appropriate when a series of several terms is listed that concludes with the disputed language. See Perlera n.8 (1999).  Each of the words in the series preceding the disputed word describes a place of public or commercial use. The final word, "building," is a general word. Pursuant to the doctrine of ejusdem generis, we construe the general word "building" to refer to structures similar in nature to those described by the preceding specific words, i.e., places of public or commercial use, places of assembly or places of work.

             

            "'Building' [in the statute] must be read to refer to structures used for purposes like those of the other structures listed." Eakin, supra at 592. An owner-occupied family home is not a "building" within the terms of the statute.

             

            "The large number of owners of [these types of homes] in the Commonwealth should not be exposed to expanded civil liability deriving from the regulatory provisions of chapter 143 except by express and clear legislation evidencing that intention." Santos at 94. See Lindsey (1977). We do not attempt to define the class encompassed by the statute more precisely, see Santos, supra at 92, preferring to leave that either to the Legislature or to development on future factual records.*fn5

             

            The broad definition of "building" found in G. L. c. 143,("In this chapter the following terms . . . shall have the following meanings") as "a combination of any materials, whether portable or fixed, having a roof, to form a structure for the shelter of persons, animals or property," does not alter our interpretation. Although this global definition may be appropriate for various sections of G.L. c.143, if it were applied to the instant section, it would render the remaining words in the listing superfluous.

             

            We do not read a statute so as to render any of its terms meaningless or superfluous. Bynes (1991), and cases cited. See also St. Germaine (1992) ("It is apparent . . . from the specific types of structures mentioned in 51 . . . and the definition contained in G. L. c. 143, 1 . . . for the general term 'building,' that 51 is not meant to apply to a single family home that is under construction"). See Santos at 93.  There is nothing to indicate that the private home is public or commercial in the sense of the words of the statute.

             

            ============================================

             

            So where does this leave you?

             

            We believe that you can fight “city hall” and win in this case.  But remember we discussed the possibility that the town will not just back off and leave you alone as that would set a precedent and then every other home owner would follow your lead.

             

            So if you decide to stand up for your property rights – we feel that you can count on a court battle and the levying of the 1000 dollar a day fines they threatened you with.  This amount however appears also to be just hot air as Mass Law limits such fines to a MAXIMUM of 300 dollars per OCCURRENCE.

             

            If you want to fight this yourself – you should not have much trouble as it will be mostly a paperwork battle and possibly a couple of court hearings in front of a judge.  You should also know that the courts in MASS are very corrupt (ask Scott) and they will not help you unless you are able to demonstrate absolutely that you are right.

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: delaybox
            Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2006 2:05 PM
            Subject: [tips_and_tricks] Building permit & property taxes

            I am building a warehouse on my property & want to do it without
            getting a building permit. does anyone know the proceedure?

            Also can anyone help about how to go about not paying property taxes?

            Thank you.

            Bob

          • Bob
            In Washington state, I was presented with a stop work sticker (red tag) on my front gate saying, stop work immediately and get a permit or be fined etc. within
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 3, 2006
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              In Washington state, I was presented with a stop work sticker (red tag) on my front gate saying, stop work immediately and get a permit or be fined etc. within two weeks. I ignored them and three weeks later I received a letter from the county attorney office saying that a suit would be started against me if I did not comply. I sent a letter to the county attorney saying that I was not aware of any laws in our county or State that required private citizens to obtain permits to build private structures on private property for private use, if I am in error, please send a copy of those laws. They sent back photo copies of the relevant codes dealing with building permits. I responded that those codes only applied to commercial structures on commercial property and that I was building a private house on private property for private use only. I never heard back from them, that was in 1993. I have continued to build many buildings, greenhouses, roads etc. without a peep from them, and the inspector regularly drives by.
              -----Original Message-----


              Go to www.landrights. com  Mr. Munro build a garage and I used his stuff.  It worked.
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: delaybox
              Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2006 1:05 PM
              Subject: [tips_and_tricks] Building permit & property taxes

              I am building a warehouse on my property & want to do it without
              getting a building permit. does anyone know the proceedure?

              Also can anyone help about how to go about not paying property taxes?

              Thank you.

              Bob

            • Ed Siceloff
              For you, or anyone else, frogfarmer, if anyone has paid off bonded indebtedness of their property, can anyone actually state about what they actually paid.
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 3, 2006
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                For you, or anyone else, frogfarmer, if anyone has "paid off" bonded
                indebtedness of their property, can anyone actually state about what they
                actually paid. I'm concerned that in governmental deficit spending that the
                bonded indebtedness on my own would be thousands and thousands of dollars.
                Yet, my own research shows that one should pursue a land patent, rather
                the typical deed of trust we get, and when that is arranged, then pay off
                the bonded indebtedness. Then one is in control of their land, and
                buildings. Rather I should say, one is now in control of the land and
                buildings that the Creator has entrusted to oneself.
                I have not done this yet. But I would like to know of different people
                who have roughly the various figures they have paid. I realize that it
                would vary immensely by circumstances.

                Ed

                Pay off all indebtedness of the property when you first acquire a
                property. Most people do not pay off the bonded indebtedness when they
                buy a property - they use small print in the contract to assume the
                debt from the former owner and to defer payment until later, by way of
                the property taxes.
              • Frog Farmer
                ... Most likely, hundreds of thousands, if not millions. ... You re right, except that so many people are running around thinking that they got a land patent
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 4, 2006
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                  On Aug 3, 2006, at 6:50 PM, Ed Siceloff wrote:

                  > I'm concerned that in governmental deficit spending that the
                  > bonded indebtedness on my own would be thousands and thousands of
                  > dollars.

                  Most likely, hundreds of thousands, if not millions.

                  > Yet, my own research shows that one should pursue a land patent,
                  > rather
                  > the typical deed of trust we get, and when that is arranged, then pay
                  > off
                  > the bonded indebtedness.

                  You're right, except that so many people are running around thinking
                  that they got a land patent with FRNs or credit instruments. They
                  don't know the difference between allodial ownership rights and an
                  insurable equitable interest. A land patent is either originally
                  granted in a treaty, etc. or it is bought and paid for with gold and/or
                  silver. Non-redeemable fiat debt certificates just don't have what it
                  takes to transfer absolute ownership. But many out there don't want to
                  face this fact. If some employee somewhere appears to authenticate a
                  patent by mistake, it will not help when later that mistake is found
                  out, which it very well may be.

                  > Then one is in control of their land, and
                  > buildings. Rather I should say, one is now in control of the land and
                  > buildings that the Creator has entrusted to oneself.

                  I'm very much in control of mine, even more so than yesterday, thanks
                  to one's post on "curtilage".

                  > I have not done this yet. But I would like to know of different
                  > people
                  > who have roughly the various figures they have paid. I realize that it
                  > would vary immensely by circumstances.

                  It would be many times the amount of the so-called "purchase price" (a
                  VERY accurate but misleading term!)

                  But you could always go find land without so much indebtedness, and
                  build from scratch. I'll tell you where to find land with allodial
                  title: look for reclaimed wetlands and diked lands that were
                  transferred in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. That's only one group
                  you can search out, mostly in the SW and California.
                • Robert Kaltenbach
                  I built 189 houses over 40 years. Some before Metro Code Regulations and some after. If you don t get a permit you may not get electricity. If you get
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 7, 2006
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                    I built 189 houses over 40 years. Some before Metro Code Regulations
                    and some after. If you don't get a permit you may not get
                    electricity. If you get electricity they may declare your building to
                    be below the 100 year flood plane level. They may also turn the
                    building over to the Board of Health. I've fought all three and
                    thereafter installed a 15 KW generator. Make them prove three things
                    to regulate your building. Demand they prove they have a monetary
                    interest, or a propietary interest or a contractual interest. Lacking
                    these they cannot regulate.

                    --- In tips_and_tricks@yahoogroups.com, "delaybox" <bporter10@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > I am building a warehouse on my property & want to do it without
                    > getting a building permit. does anyone know the proceedure?
                    >
                    > Also can anyone help about how to go about not paying property
                    taxes?
                    >
                    > Thank you.
                    >
                    > Bob
                    >
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