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Fw: Re: [tips_and_tricks] Immigration Forms - US citizen vs. Citizen of the United States of America (One of we the people)

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  • mn_chicago
    There are two types of citizenship. 1. Constitutional Citizenship, with sovereign status, hardly applicable to anyone, these days. Spelled with a capital C.
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 5, 2006
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      There are two types of citizenship.

      1. Constitutional Citizenship, with sovereign status, hardly
      applicable to anyone, these days. Spelled with a capital "C."


      2. Congress created a corporate fiction, via Art 1, sec 8, cl 17,
      and chose to call it the "United States," over which it has plenary
      power. Its citizens, spelled with a small "c," are pretty much
      subjects, literally subject to the 66 million, plus, statutes by
      which they must abide.

      Anyone who contracts to receive "benefits" from that corporate
      "United States," automatically becomes a "citizen of the United
      States." Therein begins all one's statutory problems.

      What kind of contracts?

      Birth certificate, SS#, voter registration card, driver's license,
      and one of the most insidious, the bank signature card. Once you
      sign the latter, you have enterend into a contract that makes you
      a party to all rules and regulations of the Treasuty Dept.

      Just my POV.
    • Phil Patana
      Thanks for clarifying that it is only your point of view, because I don t agreee with most of it. My wagon is hitched to the teachings of Eric Williams and
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 5, 2006
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        Thanks for clarifying that it is only your point of view, because I don't agreee with most of it.  My wagon is hitched to the teachings of Eric Williams and Jack and Margy Flynn.  Anyone wanting to learn their stuff feel free to email me at phil@....  Why make this more complicated than it need be?

        mn_chicago <mn_chicago@...> wrote:
        There are two types of citizenship.

        1. Constitutional Citizenship, with sovereign status, hardly
        applicable to anyone, these days. Spelled with a capital "C."

        2. Congress created a corporate fiction, via Art 1, sec 8, cl 17,
        and chose to call it the "United States," over which it has plenary
        power. Its citizens, spelled with a small "c," are pretty much
        subjects, literally subject to the 66 million, plus, statutes by
        which they must abide.

        Anyone who contracts to receive "benefits" from that corporate
        "United States," automatically becomes a "citizen of the United
        States." Therein begins all one's statutory problems.



      • Moisha Pippik
        OK group, I appreciate the below information, as this is correct. But the question is, what do we do about it? Do we cancel any and all illegal contracts?
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 6, 2006
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          OK group, I appreciate the below information, as this is correct.  But the question is, what do we do about it?  Do we cancel any and all illegal contracts?  That's right, these are illegal, because we did not have a meeting of the minds.  Or, do we make them prove everything...................prove that I'm a US citizen.  Prove that I have a driver's licence.  Prove that I have a SS card.  Prove that what you say is my signature, is, in fact, my signature.  We are not defeated by these so called contracts.  The courts, local, state, and federal gov't never question me when I show up to answer for the legal fiction.  Why would they?  They never make me prove who I am when completing a tax return, they never quesiton who I am when registering any information. Why is this?  Because they enjoy my labor, and the debt I suppply back to them.  Keep up the good work and information.  Remember, offer solutions to these issues.
           
          Moisha

          mn_chicago <mn_chicago@...> wrote:
          There are two types of citizenship.

          1. Constitutional Citizenship, with sovereign status, hardly
          applicable to anyone, these days. Spelled with a capital "C."

          2. Congress created a corporate fiction, via Art 1, sec 8, cl 17,
          and chose to call it the "United States," over which it has plenary
          power. Its citizens, spelled with a small "c," are pretty much
          subjects, literally subject to the 66 million, plus, statutes by
          which they must abide.

          Anyone who contracts to receive "benefits" from that corporate
          "United States," automatically becomes a "citizen of the United
          States." Therein begins all one's statutory problems.

          What kind of contracts?

          Birth certificate, SS#, voter registration card, driver's license,
          and one of the most insidious, the bank signature card. Once you
          sign the latter, you have enterend into a contract that makes you
          a party to all rules and regulations of the Treasuty Dept.

          Just my POV.


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        • mn_chicago
          No. Your idea of what constitutes a contract and the gov t s idea are somewhat different. The biggest major difference is that at least you would act
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 6, 2006
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            No. Your idea of what constitutes a contract and the gov't's idea
            are somewhat different. The biggest major difference is that at
            least you would act honorably.

            Let's take the worst kind of gov't contract...the bank signature
            card.

            "The undersigned does hereby agree to abide by all the Rules of the
            Bank."

            Seems innouous enough, does it not? But wait!

            ALL the Rules? Yes, all the rules. That means you just signed on
            to abiding by all the rules of the Secretary of Treasury, an
            engrafted agreement. And yes, all of Title 26, the tax code, is a
            part of them rules.

            What did you get for consideration? Gov't benefits, such as they
            are.

            Consideration given. Valid contract. Nothing illegal here.

            You didn't have a meeting of the minds? Are you goofy?! What kind
            of contract would THAT be? (I told you you would be honorable.)

            Driver's license? You signed, willingly, knowingly, and
            intentionally. Consideration? You have privileges, and you are also
            responsible for all the fines that go with your privileges.

            Sounds valid to me. And not at all illegal.

            Voter registration card? "Sign here, please." "Sure."

            Make them prove you are a US citizen? For sure you are a citizen of
            the fictional "United States." That's citizen, with a small "c," aka
            a subject. They don't need to prove anything. You have been leaving
            your signature all over the place. Want proof?

            You think you are not defeated in these contracts? You might want to
            rethink that thought.

            And when you show up and announce yourself in court? You just agreed
            to the court's jurisdiction, yet another contract. While in court,
            and all court operate under contract law, per UCC, do not argue any
            Constitutional issues. The Bill of Rights cannot abridge any
            contracts.

            Don't argue how unfair it may seem. Unfairness is not a part of
            any contract, so it does not apply. A contract is a contract. The
            only things that matter are the terms of the contract. Nothing else,
            nothing else applies.

            Ask Irwin Schiff. Oh, wait. He's in jail. Know why? He failed to
            undertand his contractual obligations, as explained above. He
            argued Constitutional issues, issues of unfairness. I warned you,
            they don't apply. You do not want to become a cell mate, do you?

            Prove who you are when you sign a tax form? You are signing it under
            penalty of perjury. It had better be you. That, by the way, is yet
            another contract you signed willingly, knowingly, and intentionally.

            Solutions?

            Good idea.

            Get rid of all bank signature cards. Get rid of your driver's
            license. Don't sign any more W-4s. Stop voting.

            Of course, there are a few apparent problems with these tactics.

            You have to know how to say no.

            Send a Notice to the bank(s) rescinding your signature. Deny you
            are a party to any implied contracts in the signing. Make it in the
            form of an affidavit.

            Need to sign another form or open a new account? Cross out any
            damning agreements. Write "Without Prejudice" over your signature,
            and make it overlap in case of an "accidental erasure."

            These gov't contracts are "unconditional." When you sign "Without
            Prejudice" over your signature, you are imposing a "condition,"
            your reservation of rights. When you impose a condition on an
            unconditional contract, it becomes dead in law.

            "Without Prejudice," the UCC 1-308 remedy. Don't leave home without
            it.

            A W-4? Sign it "Without Prejudice." That'll put the brakes on the
            IRS leeches.

            Just a few thoughts.
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