Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Lowering Standards (Wings)(Mary)

Expand Messages
  • Susan Donahue
    Dear Mary, Good for you! I hope you have a happy and productive New Year. Suzianne
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 31, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Mary,

      Good for you! I hope you have a happy and productive New Year.

      Suzianne

      --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, Mary Jones <maryajj25@...> wrote:
      >
      > mtracht
      > I sympathize with you and your well spoken negatives.
      > I prefer to embrace the activity of looking for-and finding those who share my values.
      >  
      > MAJJ
      >
      >
      > >________________________________
      > > From: "mtracht508@..." <mtracht508@...>
      > >To: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Monday, December 31, 2012 8:53:47 AM
      > >Subject: Re: [ticket2write] Lowering Standards (Wings)
      > >
      > >
      > > 
      > >
      > > Dear Wings:
      > >
      > >Your notes on a more refined life causes me to smile. It is not so much
      > those small articles of grace that have disappeared but the common sense that
      > accompanied them. All the bone china in the world doesn't make up for the clod
      > who answers a cell phone in a restaurant, or worse yet, initiates a call. I have
      > reacted badly to those people but I do it so quietly that it doesn't cause a
      > scene. I do admit to having once quietly told a woman at the next table who was
      > speaking about her intimate medical procedures to the person on the
      > other end of the phone so loudly and in such detail that I could have
      > critiqued the surgeon who performed them, that if she didn't put the phone away
      > that instant, I would give her gynecologist cause to have the greatest story
      > ever to tell his dinner date.
      > >
      > >I come from a family that didn't have bone china or more than one fork to
      > go with a meal, but we had respect for the occasion of a meal. It was a time for
      > conversation, not for watching a telly or, in our case, listening to a radio
      > (1940s) to entertain us at dinner. We used cups and saucers. In our family, our
      > dinnerware had been collected as prizes for my parents religiously attending
      > Wednesday night movies during their 3 year engagement until
      > they accumulated a full service for 8 in a rose pattern (my Mum's name was,
      > not by coincidence, Rose) including a soup tureen, a creamer and gravy
      > boat, and a serving platter which is the last piece standing and now hangs
      > upon my kitchen wall, almost 80 years after they obtained it.
      > >
      > >Having grown up without all the refinements caused me to have similar
      > practices in my own home. I used a cup and saucer but paper napkins until recent
      > times when a "cup" of coffee was no longer 6 - 7 ounces, but a heartier 10 - 12,
      > and grew to 24 ounces if you go to a coffee shop to spend $6.00 for dubious
      > coffee in a paper cup.  I do not drink from paper
      > cups except under extraordinary circumstances, such as, finding myself
      > far from home and that is all that is available. I would still starve rather
      > than eat in an establishment that advertises its product with a 10-foot high
      > sign on the roof that exclaims, "EAT."
      > >
      > >If you think about it, the same thing has happened to writing as has
      > happened to table manners. Few writers, other than the purists, are word
      > smiths. I have always prided myself in never sending out a rough draft of
      > anything including simple notes of congratulations, condolences or thanks. I try
      > never to use a pronoun when a noun is available. I excise adverbs when I can
      > find a verb to serve a more noble representation of my thoughts. I would no more
      > split an infinitive than, in the course of my counseling practice, I would
      > tell a happily married couple to divorce.
      > >
      > >I accept that people have become not only courser but duller. I do not have
      > to like it or accept it. I do, however, have to live with it because only the
      > few will hold to higher standards. The cowards and morons will go with the
      > flow of mediocrity because either they are too lazy or lack the competence to
      > improve. The trail around the mountain is the road most traveled. Only the
      > exceptional few will risk the sojourn to the mountain top and its accompanying
      > loneliness. 
      > >
      > >So, my friend, I toast you with a cup of mocha drunk from my Obama "Birth
      > Certificate" mug. Is there a single person whose brain has two colliding neurons
      > who believes that anyone would have even questioned a President's legitimacy or
      > national origin had he been white? The world has not only sunk to new lows,
      > it calls the avaricious men and vapid women who guided us there, "leaders and
      > heroes."
      > >
      > >But a new year approaches with the swiftness of time as
      > only we who are tempered by many years of existence could see it.
      > Tomorrow will be the same as today, but the fools who tally time by a calendar
      > rather than a schedule of accomplishments, will see a new year as a time
      > for yet some additional tom-foolery which they will excuse away as they did this
      > year's batch.  As only a military mind can, during the Vietnam era, the
      > soldiers came up with a new acronym for this state of affairs: FUBAR: F---ed Up
      > Beyond All Recognition. 
      > >
      > >"We have met the enemy and he is us," as wise Pogo the 'possum said to
      > Albert Alligator one night while lost in the swamp on a skiff.
      > >
      > >In the meantime, "Laissez le bon temps roullet!"
      > >
      > >Milt
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >In a message dated 12/31/2012 8:00:21 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      > wings081@... writes:
      > > 
      > >>Lowering Standards.
      > >>Is it just me getting lazy as the days pass into
      > years or
      > >>have others dispensed with old fashioned etiquette
      > >>at
      > mealtimes.
      > >>I well remember my mother refusing to drink tea from
      > >>any cup
      > not made of finest bone china and never without
      > >>a matching saucer. Hold the
      > cup to the light and you could almost
      > >>see right through it. Rang like a
      > bell if pinged with a finger.
      > >>("Break that cup my son and you're straight
      > up to bed")
      > >>These days I drink from a mug. No saucer, just a coaster
      > >>to
      > protect the polished table top.
      > >>Nowadays, when does anybody have those
      > grapefruit spoons
      > >>in their cutlery drawer; the sugar sifter or sugar
      > tongs.
      > >>(one lump or two dear?)
      > >>Fish knives and forks can only be seen in
      > good class restaurants.
      > >>Butter knives and finger bowls went out before the
      > jive became popular.
      > >>(OK no connection with the dance floor but dating's
      > about right)
      > >>Serviettes are now disposable and have been re-named
      > tissues.
      > >>I could write chapters on our decline from the formality of
      > pre-WW2
      > >>but meanwhile I'm content to consume my aliment with the
      > very
      > >>minimal of fuss and dishwashing.
      > >>Fear not my good friends, for
      > should you ever find yourselves
      > >>around my dining table, I will bring out
      > the best silver
      > >>(monogrammed with a very ornate letter `R'for Rayner,
      > >>a
      > wedding present for my paternal grandmother)
      > >>plus Irish linen napkins with
      > ivory holders; Waterford crystal
      > >>drinking tumblers and a silver sugar
      > sifter for scattering caster
      > >>sugar on your strawberries with Cornish
      > clotted cream.
      > >>Until such time let me wish you, one and all: "Bon
      > appetit"
      > >>Happy 2013
      > >>As always
      > >>Wings.
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      >
    • Wings081
      41624 Re: Mobile phone pests I admit to the possession of a mobile phone but rarely use it. Most times it s switched off but I carry it for emergencies and
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 1, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        41624
        Re: "Mobile phone pests"
        I admit to the possession of a mobile phone but rarely use it.
        Most times it's switched off but I carry it for emergencies and
        list ICE three times in case of emergency or vehicular accidents so
        those great life savers, the paramedics, can contact my Next of Kin
        to advise those at home where to pick up the pieces.

        Re: "More than one fork to go with a meal"
        Growing up in a family of six siblings(later seven) we also only boasted
        one fork for all occasions but like you, there was always a saucer under each cup.
        There was a serving platter for the Sunday roast.
        When I refurbished my present abode from a derelict cottage to a four bed
        house I fixed a plate rack around the dining room walls and placed a variety
        of old plates and other earthenware up there. Many ancient platters with
        the original Willow Pattern.

        RE: "Coffee" During the last days of my wife's life, I solicited medical experts worldwide for relief or cures for her complaint. I was advised by one of the top clinics of UK that on no account was I to allow her coffee except as an enema.
        Tea is our national table drink but that has declined in taste following the introduction of tea bags.
        When young I remember my parents buying loose tea and brewing the liquid in a teapot which had been warmed beforehand. There was a small ladle in the tea caddy and the correct amount of leaf to use was: One spoonful for each person and one for the pot. Nowadays, unless my American branch of our family are visiting,( In which case we bring out the teapot) it's a case of pop a bag in the cup and top up with boiling water, leaving room for milk. In the old days I was a
        `Miffy' (milk in first).These days I leave it to brew while I microwave my porridge, then remove the bag and top up with milk (semi-skimmed of course).

        Sorry Milt, I have to cut this short for now as I have just been informed by phone that my family has increased with the addition of an 8 pound 7 ounce boy.
        Good hearing from you and as you so eloquently put it:
        "Let the good times roll"
        As Always
        Wings


        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, mtracht508@... wrote:
        >
        > Dear Wings:
        >
        > Your notes on a more refined life causes me to smile. It is not so much
        > those small articles of grace that have disappeared but the common sense that
        > accompanied them. All the bone china in the world doesn't make up for the
        > clod who answers a cell phone in a restaurant, or worse yet, initiates a
        > call. I have reacted badly to those people but I do it so quietly that it
        > doesn't cause a scene. I do admit to having once quietly told a woman at the
        > next table who was speaking about her intimate medical procedures to the
        > person on the other end of the phone so loudly and in such detail that I could
        > have critiqued the surgeon who performed them, that if she didn't put the
        > phone away that instant, I would give her gynecologist cause to have the
        > greatest story ever to tell his dinner date.
        >
        > I come from a family that didn't have bone china or more than one fork to
        > go with a meal, but we had respect for the occasion of a meal. It was a time
        > for conversation, not for watching a telly or, in our case, listening to a
        > radio (1940s) to entertain us at dinner. We used cups and saucers. In our
        > family, our dinnerware had been collected as prizes for my parents
        > religiously attending Wednesday night movies during their 3 year engagement until
        > they accumulated a full service for 8 in a rose pattern (my Mum's name was,
        > not by coincidence, Rose) including a soup tureen, a creamer and gravy
        > boat, and a serving platter which is the last piece standing and now hangs
        > upon my kitchen wall, almost 80 years after they obtained it.
        >
        > Having grown up without all the refinements caused me to have similar
        > practices in my own home. I used a cup and saucer but paper napkins until recent
        > times when a "cup" of coffee was no longer 6 - 7 ounces, but a heartier 10
        > - 12, and grew to 24 ounces if you go to a coffee shop to spend $6.00 for
        > dubious coffee in a paper cup. I do not drink from paper cups except
        > under extraordinary circumstances, such as, finding myself far from home and
        > that is all that is available. I would still starve rather than eat in an
        > establishment that advertises its product with a 10-foot high sign on the roof
        > that exclaims, "EAT."
        >
        > If you think about it, the same thing has happened to writing as has
        > happened to table manners. Few writers, other than the purists, are word smiths.
        > I have always prided myself in never sending out a rough draft of anything
        > including simple notes of congratulations, condolences or thanks. I try
        > never to use a pronoun when a noun is available. I excise adverbs when I can
        > find a verb to serve a more noble representation of my thoughts. I would no
        > more split an infinitive than, in the course of my counseling practice, I
        > would tell a happily married couple to divorce.
        >
        > I accept that people have become not only courser but duller. I do not have
        > to like it or accept it. I do, however, have to live with it because only
        > the few will hold to higher standards. The cowards and morons will go with
        > the flow of mediocrity because either they are too lazy or lack the
        > competence to improve. The trail around the mountain is the road most traveled.
        > Only the exceptional few will risk the sojourn to the mountain top and its
        > accompanying loneliness.
        >
        > So, my friend, I toast you with a cup of mocha drunk from my Obama "Birth
        > Certificate" mug. Is there a single person whose brain has two colliding
        > neurons who believes that anyone would have even questioned a President's
        > legitimacy or national origin had he been white? The world has not only sunk to
        > new lows, it calls the avaricious men and vapid women who guided us there,
        > "leaders and heroes."
        >
        > But a new year approaches with the swiftness of time as only we who are
        > tempered by many years of existence could see it. Tomorrow will be the same
        > as today, but the fools who tally time by a calendar rather than a schedule
        > of accomplishments, will see a new year as a time for yet some additional
        > tom-foolery which they will excuse away as they did this year's batch. As
        > only a military mind can, during the Vietnam era, the soldiers came up with
        > a new acronym for this state of affairs: FUBAR: F---ed Up Beyond All
        > Recognition.
        >
        > "We have met the enemy and he is us," as wise Pogo the 'possum said to
        > Albert Alligator one night while lost in the swamp on a skiff.
        >
        > In the meantime, "Laissez le bon temps roullet!"
        >
        > Milt
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > In a message dated 12/31/2012 8:00:21 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
        > wings081@... writes:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Lowering Standards.
        > Is it just me getting lazy as the days pass into years or
        > have others dispensed with old fashioned etiquette
        > at mealtimes.
        > I well remember my mother refusing to drink tea from
        > any cup not made of finest bone china and never without
        > a matching saucer. Hold the cup to the light and you could almost
        > see right through it. Rang like a bell if pinged with a finger.
        > ("Break that cup my son and you're straight up to bed")
        > These days I drink from a mug. No saucer, just a coaster
        > to protect the polished table top.
        > Nowadays, when does anybody have those grapefruit spoons
        > in their cutlery drawer; the sugar sifter or sugar tongs.
        > (one lump or two dear?)
        > Fish knives and forks can only be seen in good class restaurants.
        > Butter knives and finger bowls went out before the jive became popular.
        > (OK no connection with the dance floor but dating's about right)
        > Serviettes are now disposable and have been re-named tissues.
        > I could write chapters on our decline from the formality of pre-WW2
        > but meanwhile I'm content to consume my aliment with the very
        > minimal of fuss and dishwashing.
        > Fear not my good friends, for should you ever find yourselves
        > around my dining table, I will bring out the best silver
        > (monogrammed with a very ornate letter `R'for Rayner,
        > a wedding present for my paternal grandmother)
        > plus Irish linen napkins with ivory holders; Waterford crystal
        > drinking tumblers and a silver sugar sifter for scattering caster
        > sugar on your strawberries with Cornish clotted cream.
        > Until such time let me wish you, one and all: "Bon appetit"
        > Happy 2013
        > As always
        > Wings.
        >
      • mtracht508@aol.com
        Dear Wings: My heartiest congratulations on the arrival of a new and unspoiled person on the planet. Teach him your secrets. When he is a little older teach
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 1, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Dear Wings:
           
          My heartiest congratulations on the arrival of a new and unspoiled person on the planet. Teach him your secrets. When he is a little older teach him that love is blind but the neighbors ain't! Teach him that money is not important but having enough of it is. Teach him how to laugh at his own adversity and cry when the adversity belongs to others. And more than anything, teach him that cement is hard but life is difficult!
           
          Have a wonderful year.
           
          Milt
           
          In a message dated 1/1/2013 2:05:06 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, wings081@... writes:
          Sorry Milt, I have to cut this short for now as I have just been informed by phone that my family has increased with the addition of an 8 pound 7 ounce boy.
        • Susan Donahue
          Dear Wings, What wonderful news! A new child in the family is such a blessing. Suzianne
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 1, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Wings,

            What wonderful news! A new child in the family is such a blessing.

            Suzianne


            --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
            >
            > 41624
            > Re: "Mobile phone pests"
            > I admit to the possession of a mobile phone but rarely use it.
            > Most times it's switched off but I carry it for emergencies and
            > list ICE three times in case of emergency or vehicular accidents so
            > those great life savers, the paramedics, can contact my Next of Kin
            > to advise those at home where to pick up the pieces.
            >
            > Re: "More than one fork to go with a meal"
            > Growing up in a family of six siblings(later seven) we also only boasted
            > one fork for all occasions but like you, there was always a saucer under each cup.
            > There was a serving platter for the Sunday roast.
            > When I refurbished my present abode from a derelict cottage to a four bed
            > house I fixed a plate rack around the dining room walls and placed a variety
            > of old plates and other earthenware up there. Many ancient platters with
            > the original Willow Pattern.
            >
            > RE: "Coffee" During the last days of my wife's life, I solicited medical experts worldwide for relief or cures for her complaint. I was advised by one of the top clinics of UK that on no account was I to allow her coffee except as an enema.
            > Tea is our national table drink but that has declined in taste following the introduction of tea bags.
            > When young I remember my parents buying loose tea and brewing the liquid in a teapot which had been warmed beforehand. There was a small ladle in the tea caddy and the correct amount of leaf to use was: One spoonful for each person and one for the pot. Nowadays, unless my American branch of our family are visiting,( In which case we bring out the teapot) it's a case of pop a bag in the cup and top up with boiling water, leaving room for milk. In the old days I was a
            > `Miffy' (milk in first).These days I leave it to brew while I microwave my porridge, then remove the bag and top up with milk (semi-skimmed of course).
            >
            > Sorry Milt, I have to cut this short for now as I have just been informed by phone that my family has increased with the addition of an 8 pound 7 ounce boy.
            > Good hearing from you and as you so eloquently put it:
            > "Let the good times roll"
            > As Always
            > Wings
            >
            >
            > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, mtracht508@ wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear Wings:
            > >
            > > Your notes on a more refined life causes me to smile. It is not so much
            > > those small articles of grace that have disappeared but the common sense that
            > > accompanied them. All the bone china in the world doesn't make up for the
            > > clod who answers a cell phone in a restaurant, or worse yet, initiates a
            > > call. I have reacted badly to those people but I do it so quietly that it
            > > doesn't cause a scene. I do admit to having once quietly told a woman at the
            > > next table who was speaking about her intimate medical procedures to the
            > > person on the other end of the phone so loudly and in such detail that I could
            > > have critiqued the surgeon who performed them, that if she didn't put the
            > > phone away that instant, I would give her gynecologist cause to have the
            > > greatest story ever to tell his dinner date.
            > >
            > > I come from a family that didn't have bone china or more than one fork to
            > > go with a meal, but we had respect for the occasion of a meal. It was a time
            > > for conversation, not for watching a telly or, in our case, listening to a
            > > radio (1940s) to entertain us at dinner. We used cups and saucers. In our
            > > family, our dinnerware had been collected as prizes for my parents
            > > religiously attending Wednesday night movies during their 3 year engagement until
            > > they accumulated a full service for 8 in a rose pattern (my Mum's name was,
            > > not by coincidence, Rose) including a soup tureen, a creamer and gravy
            > > boat, and a serving platter which is the last piece standing and now hangs
            > > upon my kitchen wall, almost 80 years after they obtained it.
            > >
            > > Having grown up without all the refinements caused me to have similar
            > > practices in my own home. I used a cup and saucer but paper napkins until recent
            > > times when a "cup" of coffee was no longer 6 - 7 ounces, but a heartier 10
            > > - 12, and grew to 24 ounces if you go to a coffee shop to spend $6.00 for
            > > dubious coffee in a paper cup. I do not drink from paper cups except
            > > under extraordinary circumstances, such as, finding myself far from home and
            > > that is all that is available. I would still starve rather than eat in an
            > > establishment that advertises its product with a 10-foot high sign on the roof
            > > that exclaims, "EAT."
            > >
            > > If you think about it, the same thing has happened to writing as has
            > > happened to table manners. Few writers, other than the purists, are word smiths.
            > > I have always prided myself in never sending out a rough draft of anything
            > > including simple notes of congratulations, condolences or thanks. I try
            > > never to use a pronoun when a noun is available. I excise adverbs when I can
            > > find a verb to serve a more noble representation of my thoughts. I would no
            > > more split an infinitive than, in the course of my counseling practice, I
            > > would tell a happily married couple to divorce.
            > >
            > > I accept that people have become not only courser but duller. I do not have
            > > to like it or accept it. I do, however, have to live with it because only
            > > the few will hold to higher standards. The cowards and morons will go with
            > > the flow of mediocrity because either they are too lazy or lack the
            > > competence to improve. The trail around the mountain is the road most traveled.
            > > Only the exceptional few will risk the sojourn to the mountain top and its
            > > accompanying loneliness.
            > >
            > > So, my friend, I toast you with a cup of mocha drunk from my Obama "Birth
            > > Certificate" mug. Is there a single person whose brain has two colliding
            > > neurons who believes that anyone would have even questioned a President's
            > > legitimacy or national origin had he been white? The world has not only sunk to
            > > new lows, it calls the avaricious men and vapid women who guided us there,
            > > "leaders and heroes."
            > >
            > > But a new year approaches with the swiftness of time as only we who are
            > > tempered by many years of existence could see it. Tomorrow will be the same
            > > as today, but the fools who tally time by a calendar rather than a schedule
            > > of accomplishments, will see a new year as a time for yet some additional
            > > tom-foolery which they will excuse away as they did this year's batch. As
            > > only a military mind can, during the Vietnam era, the soldiers came up with
            > > a new acronym for this state of affairs: FUBAR: F---ed Up Beyond All
            > > Recognition.
            > >
            > > "We have met the enemy and he is us," as wise Pogo the 'possum said to
            > > Albert Alligator one night while lost in the swamp on a skiff.
            > >
            > > In the meantime, "Laissez le bon temps roullet!"
            > >
            > > Milt
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > In a message dated 12/31/2012 8:00:21 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
            > > wings081@ writes:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Lowering Standards.
            > > Is it just me getting lazy as the days pass into years or
            > > have others dispensed with old fashioned etiquette
            > > at mealtimes.
            > > I well remember my mother refusing to drink tea from
            > > any cup not made of finest bone china and never without
            > > a matching saucer. Hold the cup to the light and you could almost
            > > see right through it. Rang like a bell if pinged with a finger.
            > > ("Break that cup my son and you're straight up to bed")
            > > These days I drink from a mug. No saucer, just a coaster
            > > to protect the polished table top.
            > > Nowadays, when does anybody have those grapefruit spoons
            > > in their cutlery drawer; the sugar sifter or sugar tongs.
            > > (one lump or two dear?)
            > > Fish knives and forks can only be seen in good class restaurants.
            > > Butter knives and finger bowls went out before the jive became popular.
            > > (OK no connection with the dance floor but dating's about right)
            > > Serviettes are now disposable and have been re-named tissues.
            > > I could write chapters on our decline from the formality of pre-WW2
            > > but meanwhile I'm content to consume my aliment with the very
            > > minimal of fuss and dishwashing.
            > > Fear not my good friends, for should you ever find yourselves
            > > around my dining table, I will bring out the best silver
            > > (monogrammed with a very ornate letter `R'for Rayner,
            > > a wedding present for my paternal grandmother)
            > > plus Irish linen napkins with ivory holders; Waterford crystal
            > > drinking tumblers and a silver sugar sifter for scattering caster
            > > sugar on your strawberries with Cornish clotted cream.
            > > Until such time let me wish you, one and all: "Bon appetit"
            > > Happy 2013
            > > As always
            > > Wings.
            > >
            >
          • Jay Doggett
            Wings, Congratulations on the new arrival! Jay ... From: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ticket2write@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Wings081 Sent: Tuesday,
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 1, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Wings,
               
              Congratulations on the new arrival!
               
              Jay
               
               
              -----Original Message-----
              From: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ticket2write@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Wings081
              Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2013 2:05 PM
              To: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [ticket2write] Re: Lowering Standards (Milton 41624)

               

              41624
              Re: "Mobile phone pests"
              I admit to the possession of a mobile phone but rarely use it.
              Most times it's switched off but I carry it for emergencies and
              list ICE three times in case of emergency or vehicular accidents so
              those great life savers, the paramedics, can contact my Next of Kin
              to advise those at home where to pick up the pieces.

              Re: "More than one fork to go with a meal"
              Growing up in a family of six siblings(later seven) we also only boasted
              one fork for all occasions but like you, there was always a saucer under each cup.
              There was a serving platter for the Sunday roast.
              When I refurbished my present abode from a derelict cottage to a four bed
              house I fixed a plate rack around the dining room walls and placed a variety
              of old plates and other earthenware up there. Many ancient platters with
              the original Willow Pattern.

              RE: "Coffee" During the last days of my wife's life, I solicited medical experts worldwide for relief or cures for her complaint. I was advised by one of the top clinics of UK that on no account was I to allow her coffee except as an enema.
              Tea is our national table drink but that has declined in taste following the introduction of tea bags.
              When young I remember my parents buying loose tea and brewing the liquid in a teapot which had been warmed beforehand. There was a small ladle in the tea caddy and the correct amount of leaf to use was: One spoonful for each person and one for the pot. Nowadays, unless my American branch of our family are visiting,( In which case we bring out the teapot) it's a case of pop a bag in the cup and top up with boiling water, leaving room for milk. In the old days I was a
              `Miffy' (milk in first).These days I leave it to brew while I microwave my porridge, then remove the bag and top up with milk (semi-skimmed of course).

              Sorry Milt, I have to cut this short for now as I have just been informed by phone that my family has increased with the addition of an 8 pound 7 ounce boy.
              Good hearing from you and as you so eloquently put it:
              "Let the good times roll"
              As Always
              Wings

              --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, mtracht508@... wrote:
              >
              > Dear Wings:
              >
              > Your notes on a more refined life causes me to smile. It is not so much
              > those small articles of grace that have disappeared but the common sense that
              > accompanied them. All the bone china in the world doesn't make up for the
              > clod who answers a cell phone in a restaurant, or worse yet, initiates a
              > call. I have reacted badly to those people but I do it so quietly that it
              > doesn't cause a scene. I do admit to having once quietly told a woman at the
              > next table who was speaking about her intimate medical procedures to the
              > person on the other end of the phone so loudly and in such detail that I could
              > have critiqued the surgeon who performed them, that if she didn't put the
              > phone away that instant, I would give her gynecologist cause to have the
              > greatest story ever to tell his dinner date.
              >
              > I come from a family that didn't have bone china or more than one fork to
              > go with a meal, but we had respect for the occasion of a meal. It was a time
              > for conversation, not for watching a telly or, in our case, listening to a
              > radio (1940s) to entertain us at dinner. We used cups and saucers. In our
              > family, our dinnerware had been collected as prizes for my parents
              > religiously attending Wednesday night movies during their 3 year engagement until
              > they accumulated a full service for 8 in a rose pattern (my Mum's name was,
              > not by coincidence, Rose) including a soup tureen, a creamer and gravy
              > boat, and a serving platter which is the last piece standing and now hangs
              > upon my kitchen wall, almost 80 years after they obtained it.
              >
              > Having grown up without all the refinements caused me to have similar
              > practices in my own home. I used a cup and saucer but paper napkins until recent
              > times when a "cup" of coffee was no longer 6 - 7 ounces, but a heartier 10
              > - 12, and grew to 24 ounces if you go to a coffee shop to spend $6.00 for
              > dubious coffee in a paper cup. I do not drink from paper cups except
              > under extraordinary circumstances, such as, finding myself far from home and
              > that is all that is available. I would still starve rather than eat in an
              > establishment that advertises its product with a 10-foot high sign on the roof
              > that exclaims, "EAT."
              >
              > If you think about it, the same thing has happened to writing as has
              > happened to table manners. Few writers, other than the purists, are word smiths.
              > I have always prided myself in never sending out a rough draft of anything
              > including simple notes of congratulations, condolences or thanks. I try
              > never to use a pronoun when a noun is available. I excise adverbs when I can
              > find a verb to serve a more noble representation of my thoughts. I would no
              > more split an infinitive than, in the course of my counseling practice, I
              > would tell a happily married couple to divorce.
              >
              > I accept that people have become not only courser but duller. I do not have
              > to like it or accept it. I do, however, have to live with it because only
              > the few will hold to higher standards. The cowards and morons will go with
              > the flow of mediocrity because either they are too lazy or lack the
              > competence to improve. The trail around the mountain is the road most traveled.
              > Only the exceptional few will risk the sojourn to the mountain top and its
              > accompanying loneliness.
              >
              > So, my friend, I toast you with a cup of mocha drunk from my Obama "Birth
              > Certificate" mug. Is there a single person whose brain has two colliding
              > neurons who believes that anyone would have even questioned a President's
              > legitimacy or national origin had he been white? The world has not only sunk to
              > new lows, it calls the avaricious men and vapid women who guided us there,
              > "leaders and heroes."
              >
              > But a new year approaches with the swiftness of time as only we who are
              > tempered by many years of existence could see it. Tomorrow will be the same
              > as today, but the fools who tally time by a calendar rather than a schedule
              > of accomplishments, will see a new year as a time for yet some additional
              > tom-foolery which they will excuse away as they did this year's batch. As
              > only a military mind can, during the Vietnam era, the soldiers came up with
              > a new acronym for this state of affairs: FUBAR: F---ed Up Beyond All
              > Recognition.
              >
              > "We have met the enemy and he is us," as wise Pogo the 'possum said to
              > Albert Alligator one night while lost in the swamp on a skiff.
              >
              > In the meantime, "Laissez le bon temps roullet!"
              >
              > Milt
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > In a message dated 12/31/2012 8:00:21 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
              > wings081@... writes:
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Lowering Standards.
              > Is it just me getting lazy as the days pass into years or
              > have others dispensed with old fashioned etiquette
              > at mealtimes.
              > I well remember my mother refusing to drink tea from
              > any cup not made of finest bone china and never without
              > a matching saucer. Hold the cup to the light and you could almost
              > see right through it. Rang like a bell if pinged with a finger.
              > ("Break that cup my son and you're straight up to bed")
              > These days I drink from a mug. No saucer, just a coaster
              > to protect the polished table top.
              > Nowadays, when does anybody have those grapefruit spoons
              > in their cutlery drawer; the sugar sifter or sugar tongs.
              > (one lump or two dear?)
              > Fish knives and forks can only be seen in good class restaurants.
              > Butter knives and finger bowls went out before the jive became popular.
              > (OK no connection with the dance floor but dating's about right)
              > Serviettes are now disposable and have been re-named tissues.
              > I could write chapters on our decline from the formality of pre-WW2
              > but meanwhile I'm content to consume my aliment with the very
              > minimal of fuss and dishwashing.
              > Fear not my good friends, for should you ever find yourselves
              > around my dining table, I will bring out the best silver
              > (monogrammed with a very ornate letter `R'for Rayner,
              > a wedding present for my paternal grandmother)
              > plus Irish linen napkins with ivory holders; Waterford crystal
              > drinking tumblers and a silver sugar sifter for scattering caster
              > sugar on your strawberries with Cornish clotted cream.
              > Until such time let me wish you, one and all: "Bon appetit"
              > Happy 2013
              > As always
              > Wings.
              >

            • Wings081
              Hi Milton Thank you for your kind congratulations but really I did nothing but be there at the end of the phone line whenever I was needed. Haven t set eyes on
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 2, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Milton
                Thank you for your kind congratulations but really I did nothing
                but be there at the end of the phone line whenever I was needed.
                Haven't set eyes on the little chap yet as Mother and son have been kept in the ward pending satisfactory results of blood/sugar tests.
                (His Mother is Diabetic)
                Besides which it is my firm belief that most of those virus problems
                in hospital wards are taken there by visitors.I can wait and I have
                his picture on my screen, held in the arms of his big brother
                As for "teaching him my secrets", I will certainly inform him of my many mistakes
                At this time his name is Ben (Not Bejamin)but it could be changed before the registrar appends his signature to the birth certificate.

                2013 promises to be a definitive year for me as I hope it will for you.

                As always
                Wings

                --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, mtracht508@... wrote:
                >
                > Dear Wings:
                >
                > My heartiest congratulations on the arrival of a new and unspoiled person
                > on the planet. Teach him your secrets. When he is a little older teach him
                > that love is blind but the neighbors ain't! Teach him that money is not
                > important but having enough of it is. Teach him how to laugh at his own
                > adversity and cry when the adversity belongs to others. And more than anything,
                > teach him that cement is hard but life is difficult!
                >
                > Have a wonderful year.
                >
                > Milt
                >
                >
                > In a message dated 1/1/2013 2:05:06 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                > wings081@... writes:
                >
                > Sorry Milt, I have to cut this short for now as I have just been informed
                > by phone that my family has increased with the addition of an 8 pound 7
                > ounce boy.
                >
              • Wings081
                Hi Jay Thank you for your kind felicitations. As always Wings
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 2, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Jay
                  Thank you for your kind felicitations.
                  As always
                  Wings

                  --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Doggett" <jmdoggett@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Wings,
                  >
                  > Congratulations on the new arrival!
                  >
                  > Jay
                  >
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ticket2write@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Wings081
                  > Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2013 2:05 PM
                  > To: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [ticket2write] Re: Lowering Standards (Milton 41624)
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > 41624
                  > Re: "Mobile phone pests"
                  > I admit to the possession of a mobile phone but rarely use it.
                  > Most times it's switched off but I carry it for emergencies and
                  > list ICE three times in case of emergency or vehicular accidents so
                  > those great life savers, the paramedics, can contact my Next of Kin
                  > to advise those at home where to pick up the pieces.
                  >
                  > Re: "More than one fork to go with a meal"
                  > Growing up in a family of six siblings(later seven) we also only boasted
                  > one fork for all occasions but like you, there was always a saucer under each cup.
                  > There was a serving platter for the Sunday roast.
                  > When I refurbished my present abode from a derelict cottage to a four bed
                  > house I fixed a plate rack around the dining room walls and placed a variety
                  > of old plates and other earthenware up there. Many ancient platters with
                  > the original Willow Pattern.
                  >
                  > RE: "Coffee" During the last days of my wife's life, I solicited medical experts worldwide for relief or cures for her complaint.
                  > I was advised by one of the top clinics of UK that on no account was I to allow her coffee except as an enema.
                  > Tea is our national table drink but that has declined in taste following the introduction of tea bags.
                  > When young I remember my parents buying loose tea and brewing the liquid in a teapot which had been warmed beforehand. There was a
                  > small ladle in the tea caddy and the correct amount of leaf to use was: One spoonful for each person and one for the pot. Nowadays,
                  > unless my American branch of our family are visiting,( In which case we bring out the teapot) it's a case of pop a bag in the cup
                  > and top up with boiling water, leaving room for milk. In the old days I was a
                  > `Miffy' (milk in first).These days I leave it to brew while I microwave my porridge, then remove the bag and top up with milk
                  > (semi-skimmed of course).
                  >
                  > Sorry Milt, I have to cut this short for now as I have just been informed by phone that my family has increased with the addition
                  > of an 8 pound 7 ounce boy.
                  > Good hearing from you and as you so eloquently put it:
                  > "Let the good times roll"
                  > As Always
                  > Wings
                  >
                  > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, mtracht508@ wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Dear Wings:
                  > >
                  > > Your notes on a more refined life causes me to smile. It is not so much
                  > > those small articles of grace that have disappeared but the common sense that
                  > > accompanied them. All the bone china in the world doesn't make up for the
                  > > clod who answers a cell phone in a restaurant, or worse yet, initiates a
                  > > call. I have reacted badly to those people but I do it so quietly that it
                  > > doesn't cause a scene. I do admit to having once quietly told a woman at the
                  > > next table who was speaking about her intimate medical procedures to the
                  > > person on the other end of the phone so loudly and in such detail that I could
                  > > have critiqued the surgeon who performed them, that if she didn't put the
                  > > phone away that instant, I would give her gynecologist cause to have the
                  > > greatest story ever to tell his dinner date.
                  > >
                  > > I come from a family that didn't have bone china or more than one fork to
                  > > go with a meal, but we had respect for the occasion of a meal. It was a time
                  > > for conversation, not for watching a telly or, in our case, listening to a
                  > > radio (1940s) to entertain us at dinner. We used cups and saucers. In our
                  > > family, our dinnerware had been collected as prizes for my parents
                  > > religiously attending Wednesday night movies during their 3 year engagement until
                  > > they accumulated a full service for 8 in a rose pattern (my Mum's name was,
                  > > not by coincidence, Rose) including a soup tureen, a creamer and gravy
                  > > boat, and a serving platter which is the last piece standing and now hangs
                  > > upon my kitchen wall, almost 80 years after they obtained it.
                  > >
                  > > Having grown up without all the refinements caused me to have similar
                  > > practices in my own home. I used a cup and saucer but paper napkins until recent
                  > > times when a "cup" of coffee was no longer 6 - 7 ounces, but a heartier 10
                  > > - 12, and grew to 24 ounces if you go to a coffee shop to spend $6.00 for
                  > > dubious coffee in a paper cup. I do not drink from paper cups except
                  > > under extraordinary circumstances, such as, finding myself far from home and
                  > > that is all that is available. I would still starve rather than eat in an
                  > > establishment that advertises its product with a 10-foot high sign on the roof
                  > > that exclaims, "EAT."
                  > >
                  > > If you think about it, the same thing has happened to writing as has
                  > > happened to table manners. Few writers, other than the purists, are word smiths.
                  > > I have always prided myself in never sending out a rough draft of anything
                  > > including simple notes of congratulations, condolences or thanks. I try
                  > > never to use a pronoun when a noun is available. I excise adverbs when I can
                  > > find a verb to serve a more noble representation of my thoughts. I would no
                  > > more split an infinitive than, in the course of my counseling practice, I
                  > > would tell a happily married couple to divorce.
                  > >
                  > > I accept that people have become not only courser but duller. I do not have
                  > > to like it or accept it. I do, however, have to live with it because only
                  > > the few will hold to higher standards. The cowards and morons will go with
                  > > the flow of mediocrity because either they are too lazy or lack the
                  > > competence to improve. The trail around the mountain is the road most traveled.
                  > > Only the exceptional few will risk the sojourn to the mountain top and its
                  > > accompanying loneliness.
                  > >
                  > > So, my friend, I toast you with a cup of mocha drunk from my Obama "Birth
                  > > Certificate" mug. Is there a single person whose brain has two colliding
                  > > neurons who believes that anyone would have even questioned a President's
                  > > legitimacy or national origin had he been white? The world has not only sunk to
                  > > new lows, it calls the avaricious men and vapid women who guided us there,
                  > > "leaders and heroes."
                  > >
                  > > But a new year approaches with the swiftness of time as only we who are
                  > > tempered by many years of existence could see it. Tomorrow will be the same
                  > > as today, but the fools who tally time by a calendar rather than a schedule
                  > > of accomplishments, will see a new year as a time for yet some additional
                  > > tom-foolery which they will excuse away as they did this year's batch. As
                  > > only a military mind can, during the Vietnam era, the soldiers came up with
                  > > a new acronym for this state of affairs: FUBAR: F---ed Up Beyond All
                  > > Recognition.
                  > >
                  > > "We have met the enemy and he is us," as wise Pogo the 'possum said to
                  > > Albert Alligator one night while lost in the swamp on a skiff.
                  > >
                  > > In the meantime, "Laissez le bon temps roullet!"
                  > >
                  > > Milt
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > In a message dated 12/31/2012 8:00:21 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                  > > wings081@ writes:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Lowering Standards.
                  > > Is it just me getting lazy as the days pass into years or
                  > > have others dispensed with old fashioned etiquette
                  > > at mealtimes.
                  > > I well remember my mother refusing to drink tea from
                  > > any cup not made of finest bone china and never without
                  > > a matching saucer. Hold the cup to the light and you could almost
                  > > see right through it. Rang like a bell if pinged with a finger.
                  > > ("Break that cup my son and you're straight up to bed")
                  > > These days I drink from a mug. No saucer, just a coaster
                  > > to protect the polished table top.
                  > > Nowadays, when does anybody have those grapefruit spoons
                  > > in their cutlery drawer; the sugar sifter or sugar tongs.
                  > > (one lump or two dear?)
                  > > Fish knives and forks can only be seen in good class restaurants.
                  > > Butter knives and finger bowls went out before the jive became popular.
                  > > (OK no connection with the dance floor but dating's about right)
                  > > Serviettes are now disposable and have been re-named tissues.
                  > > I could write chapters on our decline from the formality of pre-WW2
                  > > but meanwhile I'm content to consume my aliment with the very
                  > > minimal of fuss and dishwashing.
                  > > Fear not my good friends, for should you ever find yourselves
                  > > around my dining table, I will bring out the best silver
                  > > (monogrammed with a very ornate letter `R'for Rayner,
                  > > a wedding present for my paternal grandmother)
                  > > plus Irish linen napkins with ivory holders; Waterford crystal
                  > > drinking tumblers and a silver sugar sifter for scattering caster
                  > > sugar on your strawberries with Cornish clotted cream.
                  > > Until such time let me wish you, one and all: "Bon appetit"
                  > > Happy 2013
                  > > As always
                  > > Wings.
                  > >
                  >
                • mtracht508@aol.com
                  Hi, Wings: You do not have to be there to have influence. it can be indirect through his parents. It can be by putting together a book of your memories that he
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 3, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi, Wings:
                     
                    You do not have to be there to have influence. it can be indirect through his parents. It can be by putting together a book of your memories that he may not read for 8 years but will connect him to an era when kings were kings and dinosaurs roamed the countryside. My mother wrote an epic poem about her mother's childhood in the 19th century in Vienna and her journey to America in the early 20th century, for my granddaughter. She bound it in plastic sheets in a notebook. Now 19, my granddaughter treasures these memories from long ago and far away. My mom has been dead for over 10 years but her writing will last for another generation. More, if I am successful in getting this work published.
                     
                    I hope that my writing leaves a legacy that will put her children in touch with their precedents some day even if I do not live to see them.
                     
                    Milt
                     
                    In a message dated 1/2/2013 6:50:17 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, wings081@... writes:
                     

                    Hi Milton
                    Thank you for your kind congratulations but really I did nothing
                    but be there at the end of the phone line whenever I was needed.
                    Haven't set eyes on the little chap yet as Mother and son have been kept in the ward pending satisfactory results of blood/sugar tests.
                    (His Mother is Diabetic)
                    Besides which it is my firm belief that most of those virus problems
                    in hospital wards are taken there by visitors.I can wait and I have
                    his picture on my screen, held in the arms of his big brother
                    As for "teaching him my secrets", I will certainly inform him of my many mistakes
                    At this time his name is Ben (Not Bejamin)but it could be changed before the registrar appends his signature to the birth certificate.

                    2013 promises to be a definitive year for me as I hope it will for you.

                    As always
                    Wings

                    --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, mtracht508@... wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear Wings:
                    >
                    > My heartiest congratulations on the arrival of a new and unspoiled person
                    > on the planet. Teach him your secrets. When he is a little older teach him
                    > that love is blind but the neighbors ain't! Teach him that money is not
                    > important but having enough of it is. Teach him how to laugh at his own
                    > adversity and cry when the adversity belongs to others. And more than anything,
                    > teach him that cement is hard but life is difficult!
                    >
                    > Have a wonderful year.
                    >
                    > Milt
                    >
                    >
                    > In a message dated 1/1/2013 2:05:06 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                    > wings081@... writes:
                    >
                    > Sorry Milt, I have to cut this short for now as I have just been informed
                    > by phone that my family has increased with the addition of an 8 pound 7
                    > ounce boy.
                    >

                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.