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Happy first day of Summer

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  • Susan Donahue
    It just occured to me that some of our t2w members will enjoy the longest day of the year today and our Aussie friends will be in the dark before supper time.
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 21, 2010
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      It just occured to me that some of our t2w members will enjoy the longest day of the year today and our Aussie friends will be in the dark before supper time.

      I intend to mark the ocassion with a volume of Wordsworth and s'mores made around the patio fire pit. It's "Splendor in the Grass" time where I live in the beautiful Ozarks. That should inspire some poetry.
    • Wings081
      Dear Suzi Spare a thought for the poor Brit and thank heaven for Google who advised me that S MORES consisted of roasted marshmallow with a layer of chocolate
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 21, 2010
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        Dear Suzi
        Spare a thought for the poor Brit and thank heaven for Google who
        advised me that S'MORES consisted of roasted marshmallow with a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two pieces of Graham cracker. Back again to Google who tell me a Graham cracker is sweet rather than salty as most crackers.
        Try Googling "Sunrise at Stonehenge 2010" where sunrise was at 0445 hrs this morning.
        Enjoy your solstice with Wordsworth who wrote:
        "Pleasures newly found are sweet
        When they lay about our feet."
        As ever
        Wings
      • Susan Donahue
        Poor Wings! A life in a country without graham crackers is hard to imagine. We eat the lovely light brown crackers like cookies, and for a special treat we
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 23, 2010
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          Poor Wings! A life in a country without graham crackers is hard to imagine. We eat the lovely light brown crackers like cookies, and for a special treat we top them with the left over chocolate icing when our mothers make layer cakes. I have been known to break a few into piecs and put them in a bowl then cover them with milk and eat them in a soggy state in place of breakfast cereal. I also crush them and add a little butter and brown sugar to make an easy pie crust. My favorite way to eat graham crackers is to use them for s'mores. Gimme some more, please.

          Suzianne


          --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Dear Suzi
          > Spare a thought for the poor Brit and thank heaven for Google who
          > advised me that S'MORES consisted of roasted marshmallow with a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two pieces of Graham cracker. Back again to Google who tell me a Graham cracker is sweet rather than salty as most crackers.
          > Try Googling "Sunrise at Stonehenge 2010" where sunrise was at 0445 hrs this morning.
          > Enjoy your solstice with Wordsworth who wrote:
          > "Pleasures newly found are sweet
          > When they lay about our feet."
          > As ever
          > Wings
          >
        • Wings081
          Dear Suzi Re: Poor Wings in a country without Graham Crackers Poor Suzianne,living in a country which has never been fed a Cornish pasty made with beef and
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 4, 2010
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            Dear Suzi
            Re: "Poor Wings in a country without Graham Crackers"


            Poor Suzianne,living in a country which has never been fed a Cornish pasty made with beef and including a generous helping of locally grown swede, that which I believe you call rutabaga (Brassica napobrassica).Never experienced the pleasure of the juice running down your chin as you take the first bite (yummy!)

            Never drooled over a Cornish cream tea consisting of a hot scone spread thickly with clotted cream (Oh my poor arteries) topped with a generous helping of strawberry conserve.

            Never sat down to Star Gazy pie,

            Never bit a Cornish Fairing (you may never enjoy these now as the main suppliers have gone out of business).

            Saffron cake. (my mouth waters at the thought)

            Finish off with a good measure of Cornish Mead otherwise known as the Honeymoon Drink.
            When my wife and I catered for seasonal visitors to this fair corner of Britain
            married couples ,due to tax advantages in those days, would wed in October.
            We would treat them to a flagon of Cornish mead to celebrate their nuptials and many is the time they have returned the following year accompanied by a young addition to their family requiring a family room with cot and blaming us for encouraging an extension of their
            lineage.
            My dear Suzi, if you have never indulged yourself with any of these delicacies,you haven't yet lived.
            Happy July 4th
            As ever,
            Wings
          • Susan Donahue
            Dear Wings, Several years ago, one of your relatives sent me a recipe for pasties. My niece and I have made hundreds of them since then. We make the
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 6, 2010
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              Dear Wings,

              Several years ago, one of your relatives sent me a recipe for pasties. My niece and I have made hundreds of them since then. We make the traditional steak pasties with a little fruit at one end for desert. They have become family favorites for picnics and for going fishing.

              Sadly, I have never has the pleasure of trying the other items you mentioned. My English grandmother and her daughters tended to perpetuate the tradition of bad British home cooking.

              I am curious about Star Gazy pie. Does it involve rabbit? I would love to give it a try.

              You have made me hungry!

              Suzianne





              --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dear Suzi
              > Re: "Poor Wings in a country without Graham Crackers"
              >
              >
              > Poor Suzianne,living in a country which has never been fed a Cornish pasty made with beef and including a generous helping of locally grown swede, that which I believe you call rutabaga (Brassica napobrassica).Never experienced the pleasure of the juice running down your chin as you take the first bite (yummy!)
              >
              > Never drooled over a Cornish cream tea consisting of a hot scone spread thickly with clotted cream (Oh my poor arteries) topped with a generous helping of strawberry conserve.
              >
              > Never sat down to Star Gazy pie,
              >
              > Never bit a Cornish Fairing (you may never enjoy these now as the main suppliers have gone out of business).
              >
              > Saffron cake. (my mouth waters at the thought)
              >
              > Finish off with a good measure of Cornish Mead otherwise known as the Honeymoon Drink.
              > When my wife and I catered for seasonal visitors to this fair corner of Britain
              > married couples ,due to tax advantages in those days, would wed in October.
              > We would treat them to a flagon of Cornish mead to celebrate their nuptials and many is the time they have returned the following year accompanied by a young addition to their family requiring a family room with cot and blaming us for encouraging an extension of their
              > lineage.
              > My dear Suzi, if you have never indulged yourself with any of these delicacies,you haven't yet lived.
              > Happy July 4th
              > As ever,
              > Wings
              >
            • Wings081
              Dear Suzi Did the person who told you about Cornish Pasties tell you the old tale of why the crimped edge was thrown away by miners. Apparently miners hands
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 7, 2010
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                Dear Suzi
                Did the person who told you about Cornish Pasties tell you the old tale of why the crimped edge was thrown away by miners.
                Apparently miners hands would become engrained with arsenic and so they always threw away the crimped edge which they had hold of whilst eating.


                Re: "Star Gazy pie"
                Without going into too much detail,this is a round pie including chopped onion,chopped streaky bacon,white wine,fish stock,double cream,chopped parsley,hard boiled eggs and six pilchards or small mackerel.
                The fish are laid with their tails in the centre of the dish and their heads poking out through the crust,gazing to the heavens,
                hence Star Gazy pie.
                Unfortunately the Cornish pilchard has been fished out but in Newquay,overlooking the bay, there remains a stone built building with external stone steps leading to the roof.
                This building is known as the Huers Hut and it was from that building in olden days a man would look out over the bay to see the shoals of pilchards and raise the 'hue & cry' to the boats from his vantage point directing them to the best catch positions.

                There's another snippet of useless info for you to digest
                As ever
                Wings.
              • Susan Donahue
                Dear Wings, I was told about discarding the crust at the end and was also told that the wives pressed their men s initials in the crust at the good end so they
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 8, 2010
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                  Dear Wings,

                  I was told about discarding the crust at the end and was also told that the wives pressed their men's initials in the crust at the good end so they would know from which end to start eating. Clever girls, those Cornish women!

                  Regarding the star gazy pies, I doubt I could get anyone at my table to dig into a pie that looks back at them. Since my father died, I have not had anyone want to share a tin of sardines or a bowl of boulabaise (sp?)with me. There seems to be a prejudice against fish heads and tails among those near and dear to me.

                  Thank you for sending me the photographs of the Huers Hut. I know just the place to build a replica overlooking Beaver Lake. It is a charming bit of history.

                  Thanks for the inspiration! I will browse through my recipe box for something interesting to prepare for supper tonight.

                  Suzianne



                  --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Dear Suzi
                  > Did the person who told you about Cornish Pasties tell you the old tale of why the crimped edge was thrown away by miners.
                  > Apparently miners hands would become engrained with arsenic and so they always threw away the crimped edge which they had hold of whilst eating.
                  >
                  >
                  > Re: "Star Gazy pie"
                  > Without going into too much detail,this is a round pie including chopped onion,chopped streaky bacon,white wine,fish stock,double cream,chopped parsley,hard boiled eggs and six pilchards or small mackerel.
                  > The fish are laid with their tails in the centre of the dish and their heads poking out through the crust,gazing to the heavens,
                  > hence Star Gazy pie.
                  > Unfortunately the Cornish pilchard has been fished out but in Newquay,overlooking the bay, there remains a stone built building with external stone steps leading to the roof.
                  > This building is known as the Huers Hut and it was from that building in olden days a man would look out over the bay to see the shoals of pilchards and raise the 'hue & cry' to the boats from his vantage point directing them to the best catch positions.
                  >
                  > There's another snippet of useless info for you to digest
                  > As ever
                  > Wings.
                  >
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