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Re: Writing Tip "Getting Rid of Got" on Suite 101 (Suzianne39613

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  • wings081
    Dear Suzi As always I bow to your superior knowledge. As ever Wings Re. Women submariners They have been around for centuries. The ancients called them
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 25, 2010
      Dear Suzi
      As always I bow to your superior knowledge.
      As ever
      Wings

      Re. "Women submariners"
      They have been around for centuries.
      The ancients called them mermaids
    • albiaicehouse
      Wings, Well, wings, I think we are dealing with orders of magnitude difference with the general level of grammatical syntax in the general population here
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 25, 2010
        Wings,

        Well, wings, I think we are dealing with orders of magnitude difference with the general level of grammatical syntax in the general population here versus in your fair isle.

        But while we are on the topic of the word "got", I wonder what you think of the term "gotta"?

        In case you are not familiar with the term, the next time you are visiting the kitchen of a female friend or relative, sit with a harrumph on an empty stool and say, "Whatz a fella gotta do to get fed round heyrah?" and count how many seconds it is before you are booted or pulled by your own earlobe outside said establishment!

        Rod
        aka albi

        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Rod
        >
        > Re. "secretly envious of the English speaking"
        > You GOT that wrong my friend. My English teacher,a Welshman,must be turning in his grave at the grammatical faux pas uttered in the name of English.
        > It is thrust upon us from every quarter.Take 'Britain's Got Talent'
        > The apostrophe after the word Britain would indicate Britain IS or Britain HAS.So eliminate the apostrophe and we have Britain is got talent or Britain has got talent.To me has and got,in this instance, are the same so we now have Britain has has talent.
        > I open my paper daily and read mistakes everywhere which cannot always be blamed on the typesetters.
        > Writing today about allowing women on submarines: "There are concerns over the danger of fumes to a foetus if a woman WERE pregnant."
        > OK I admit both were and was are both the past tense of BE but I feel was would sound more natural. So it would seem a matter of personal choice and let's throw grammatical correctness out of the window.
        >
        > RE. your "Spud"
        > I'm having a few of those for dinner this evening.Roast,boiled or mashed,I will not be using a hammer.
        >
        > GOT to go
        >
        > As always
        > Wings
        >
        >
        > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Wings and Jake,
        > >
        > > I am secretly envious of the English as when they are interviewed on the street, they not only speak in complete and grammatically correct sentences with no noticeable hesitation, most actually speak in paragraphs, too.
        > >
        > > But as to "got", do not blame the Americans. The Old Norse (Vikings?) made such a utilitarian word of "get" and all its conjugations.
        > >
        > > And I like utilitarian words. They remind me of the "spud" I bought over two decades ago. It is a steel rod approximately 4 feet in length which has a chisel point on one end and butt end accepting of large hammers on the other end. That spud is one of the best purchases I ever made. To look at it you'd think it wasn't much. Yet, I have used it so many times and ways it boggles my imagination. My initial investment in that tool has easily multiplied by 1,000.
        > >
        > > So "got" may simple and terse, yet think of all the ways it can be used!
        > >
        > > Rod
        > > aka albi
        > >
        > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Hi Jake
        > > > Good to see you also.Especially with advice on outlawing the word Got.
        > > > Why oh why do people still say I've got.
        > > > They might just as well say "I have, have"
        > > > Got, the past participle of get, should be scrubbed from the OED.
        > > > However, what riles me more is the American habit of using gotten.
        > > > It is in one of my dictionaries and attributed to the US with the definition: to have obtained."He had gotten a car for his 21st birthday"
        > > > Why not: "he had a car for his 21st birthday"
        > > > I wonder what our Suzianne taught her charges.
        > > > As always
        > > > Wings
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "achgook2004" <themysticalindian@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Here is a link to one of my articles on Suite 101 regarding writing tips and getting published.
        > > > >
        > > > > http://research-writing-techniques.suite101.com/article.cfm/writing-tip---getting-rid-of-got
        > > > >
        > > > > By the way Hi Wings nice to see you around.
        > > > >
        > > > > Jake
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
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