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Re: Ships Go Down

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  • halukdireskeneli
    Poem is good, However it is 100 years old story, all surveyors are dead Now it is time to write poem on AirFrance 447, no surveyors We all have long air
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 9, 2009
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      Poem is good, However it is 100 years old story, all surveyors are dead

      Now it is time to write poem on AirFrance 447, no surveyors

      We all have long air flights- we all have exposure to that minimal risk

      Kind regards

      Haluk Direskeneli
      Ankara based Energy Analyst
    • wings081
      Haluk my friend. Please excuse me for pointing out an error in your message 38719. For the word surveyors you obviously meant survivors. A surveyor is a person
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 10, 2009
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        Haluk my friend. Please excuse me for pointing out an error in your message 38719.
        For the word surveyors you obviously meant survivors. A surveyor is a person who is concerned with the official inspection of something for purposes of valuation or measurement.
        Perhaps if the marine surveyors of the Titanic had completed their job properly and insisted there were sufficient lifeboats for all aboard that ill-fated ship, history might have changed considerably.

        Re; the latest disaster with the Air France. The pieces are being put together and an answer will hopefully prevent a further loss of life.
        Shortly after WW2 I was enjoying my eggs and bacon in the mess, when, over the Tannoy public address system, I was called for an immediate Air-Sea rescue flight. No time to finish my food, there were people out there needed help and so with a rushed briefing we were off out of St. Eval in Cornwall to Shannon in west Ireland. A Constellation aircraft had gone down after leaving Shannon with a full load of passengers. Mostly Catholics en-route from Rome to a convention in the US.
        The coordinates we were given for the last reported position were plotted on our navigators chart and as we neared the spot everyone was on the look out for signs of wreckage.
        Now with a calm sea the task would have been relatively easy but on that particular day there was a high wind and a very choppy surface to the water.

        We searched for hours without success. I reduced speed with all four engines throttled back and undercart down to increase drag until it was becoming a little too risky to continue in this configuration at low level hopping over the waves. Eventually a few seats and bits of fabric which might have been parts of lifejackets were floating around. However nothing else and no bodies were discovered by us and we were forced, due to fuel constrictions, to return to base.
        Unless you have been in a similar situation it may seem easy to spot an aircraft or debris on the surface of the sea but I can tell you from bitter experience from this and other ASR flights I undertook,
        the layman has no idea how hard it is to spot a tiny dinghy or bit of wreckage on a broken sea surface.
        I sympathised with those sailors and airmen who must have been very frustrated at finding no immediate signs of the Air France plane.

        As always
        Wings

















        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "halukdireskeneli" <halukdireskeneli@...> wrote:
        >
        > Poem is good, However it is 100 years old story, all surveyors are dead
        >
        > Now it is time to write poem on AirFrance 447, no surveyors
        >
        > We all have long air flights- we all have exposure to that minimal risk
        >
        > Kind regards
        >
        > Haluk Direskeneli
        > Ankara based Energy Analyst
        >
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