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A Headline for Wings

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  • albiaicehouse
    Wings, I saw this headline in the New York Times today: Boats Too Costly to Keep Are Littering Coastlines There has to be a ton of stories in that headline!
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 1, 2009
      Wings,

      I saw this headline in the New York Times today:

      Boats Too Costly to Keep Are Littering Coastlines

      There has to be a ton of stories in that headline!

      Imagine some young people pull a bunch of floaters together and lash them. How would they get the fuel to move it around? Would they want to? Or would this grow into a communal party boat from which to make forays? Would this start as fun and end in madness?

      Rod
      aka albi

      http://www.geocities.com/neocoda
    • wings081
      Hi Rod Re. Boats too expensive to keep. We have the same problem with fishing boats in UK. Due to depleted fish stocks around our shores, fishermen are being
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 1, 2009
        Hi Rod
        Re. Boats too expensive to keep.
        We have the same problem with fishing boats in UK.
        Due to depleted fish stocks around our shores, fishermen are being offered substantial amounts to cut up their boats for scrap.
        This is mainly down to an EU directive limiting the amount of fish we may catch.

        As to a story: There are endless possibilities. My first would be to securely fasten the boats together to make one large floating prison ship, to be anchored far enough off-shore that any bad lad would think more than twice before attempting an escape.
        Assuming the boats on the periphery will receive the worse battering from the sea, those could be reserved for the unruly cons who would be fed on bread pudding and de-salinated sea water with no television or conjugal rights. For food, they can eat what they can catch from the sea.
        One minor problem would be to employ staff not subject to mal de mer.
        If a sufficient number of boats were to be used, perhaps there would be room for a heli-pad in the centre.

        Another idea would be to start a `Chicken Ranch' similar to the one outside Las Vegas, Nevada, where gentlemen could `relax' in the company of `ladies without inhibitions'.
        This could be incorporated with the prison ship, for the use of Trusties and prison officers.

        Bags me for first Governor

        As always

        Wings
        Ps. Re. "Would this end in madness?"
        Quite possibly with me in charge.

        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > Wings,
        >
        > I saw this headline in the New York Times today:
        >
        > Boats Too Costly to Keep Are Littering Coastlines
        >
        > There has to be a ton of stories in that headline!
        >
        > Imagine some young people pull a bunch of floaters together and lash them. How would they get the fuel to move it around? Would they want to? Or would this grow into a communal party boat from which to make forays? Would this start as fun and end in madness?
        >
        > Rod
        > aka albi
        >
        > http://www.geocities.com/neocoda
        >
      • detectivetraininginstitute
        ... Hey, guys! I think it would be fun, as long as there would be food, water, and extra ways to get back to land. Lorri
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 1, 2009
          --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hi Rod
          > Re. Boats too expensive to keep.
          > We have the same problem with fishing boats in UK.
          > Due to depleted fish stocks around our shores, fishermen are being offered substantial amounts to cut up their boats for scrap.
          > This is mainly down to an EU directive limiting the amount of fish we may catch.
          >
          > As to a story: There are endless possibilities. My first would be to securely fasten the boats together to make one large floating prison ship, to be anchored far enough off-shore that any bad lad would think more than twice before attempting an escape.
          > Assuming the boats on the periphery will receive the worse battering from the sea, those could be reserved for the unruly cons who would be fed on bread pudding and de-salinated sea water with no television or conjugal rights. For food, they can eat what they can catch from the sea.
          > One minor problem would be to employ staff not subject to mal de mer.
          > If a sufficient number of boats were to be used, perhaps there would be room for a heli-pad in the centre.
          >
          > Another idea would be to start a `Chicken Ranch' similar to the one outside Las Vegas, Nevada, where gentlemen could `relax' in the company of `ladies without inhibitions'.
          > This could be incorporated with the prison ship, for the use of Trusties and prison officers.
          >
          > Bags me for first Governor
          >
          > As always
          >
          > Wings
          > Ps. Re. "Would this end in madness?"
          > Quite possibly with me in charge.
          >
          > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Wings,
          > >
          > > I saw this headline in the New York Times today:
          > >
          > > Boats Too Costly to Keep Are Littering Coastlines
          > >
          > > There has to be a ton of stories in that headline!
          > >
          > > Imagine some young people pull a bunch of floaters together and lash them. How would they get the fuel to move it around? Would they want to? Or would this grow into a communal party boat from which to make forays? Would this start as fun and end in madness?
          > >
          > > Rod
          > > aka albi
          > >
          > > http://www.geocities.com/neocoda
          > >
          >
          Hey, guys!

          I think it would be fun, as long as there would be food, water, and extra ways to get back to land.

          Lorri
        • Richard J. Bates
          Do we really fancy another WaterWorld though? Movie goers would be casting their bread upon unrepentant waters. Wot?
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 3, 2009
            Do we really fancy another WaterWorld 'though?
            Movie goers would be casting their bread upon unrepentant waters. Wot?






            --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hi Rod
            > Re. Boats too expensive to keep.
            > We have the same problem with fishing boats in UK.
            > Due to depleted fish stocks around our shores, fishermen are being offered substantial amounts to cut up their boats for scrap.
            > This is mainly down to an EU directive limiting the amount of fish we may catch.
            >
            > As to a story: There are endless possibilities. My first would be to securely fasten the boats together to make one large floating prison ship, to be anchored far enough off-shore that any bad lad would think more than twice before attempting an escape.
            > Assuming the boats on the periphery will receive the worse battering from the sea, those could be reserved for the unruly cons who would be fed on bread pudding and de-salinated sea water with no television or conjugal rights. For food, they can eat what they can catch from the sea.
            > One minor problem would be to employ staff not subject to mal de mer.
            > If a sufficient number of boats were to be used, perhaps there would be room for a heli-pad in the centre.
            >
            > Another idea would be to start a `Chicken Ranch' similar to the one outside Las Vegas, Nevada, where gentlemen could `relax' in the company of `ladies without inhibitions'.
            > This could be incorporated with the prison ship, for the use of Trusties and prison officers.
            >
            > Bags me for first Governor
            >
            > As always
            >
            > Wings
            > Ps. Re. "Would this end in madness?"
            > Quite possibly with me in charge.
            >
            > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Wings,
            > >
            > > I saw this headline in the New York Times today:
            > >
            > > Boats Too Costly to Keep Are Littering Coastlines
            > >
            > > There has to be a ton of stories in that headline!
            > >
            > > Imagine some young people pull a bunch of floaters together and lash them. How would they get the fuel to move it around? Would they want to? Or would this grow into a communal party boat from which to make forays? Would this start as fun and end in madness?
            > >
            > > Rod
            > > aka albi
            > >
            > > http://www.geocities.com/neocoda
            > >
            >
          • albiaicehouse
            Sometimes reality follows fiction.
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 4, 2009
              Sometimes reality follows fiction.


              --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Richard J. Bates" <icyimeir@...> wrote:
              >
              > Do we really fancy another WaterWorld 'though?
              > Movie goers would be casting their bread upon unrepentant waters. Wot?
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > Hi Rod
              > > Re. Boats too expensive to keep.
              > > We have the same problem with fishing boats in UK.
              > > Due to depleted fish stocks around our shores, fishermen are being offered substantial amounts to cut up their boats for scrap.
              > > This is mainly down to an EU directive limiting the amount of fish we may catch.
              > >
              > > As to a story: There are endless possibilities. My first would be to securely fasten the boats together to make one large floating prison ship, to be anchored far enough off-shore that any bad lad would think more than twice before attempting an escape.
              > > Assuming the boats on the periphery will receive the worse battering from the sea, those could be reserved for the unruly cons who would be fed on bread pudding and de-salinated sea water with no television or conjugal rights. For food, they can eat what they can catch from the sea.
              > > One minor problem would be to employ staff not subject to mal de mer.
              > > If a sufficient number of boats were to be used, perhaps there would be room for a heli-pad in the centre.
              > >
              > > Another idea would be to start a `Chicken Ranch' similar to the one outside Las Vegas, Nevada, where gentlemen could `relax' in the company of `ladies without inhibitions'.
              > > This could be incorporated with the prison ship, for the use of Trusties and prison officers.
              > >
              > > Bags me for first Governor
              > >
              > > As always
              > >
              > > Wings
              > > Ps. Re. "Would this end in madness?"
              > > Quite possibly with me in charge.
              > >
              > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Wings,
              > > >
              > > > I saw this headline in the New York Times today:
              > > >
              > > > Boats Too Costly to Keep Are Littering Coastlines
              > > >
              > > > There has to be a ton of stories in that headline!
              > > >
              > > > Imagine some young people pull a bunch of floaters together and lash them. How would they get the fuel to move it around? Would they want to? Or would this grow into a communal party boat from which to make forays? Would this start as fun and end in madness?
              > > >
              > > > Rod
              > > > aka albi
              > > >
              > > > http://www.geocities.com/neocoda
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • wings081
              Hi Rod Re: Do we really fancy another Wonderworld Whether we fancy it or don t is not the question. At the present rate of global warming it is only a matter
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 4, 2009
                Hi Rod
                Re: "Do we really fancy another Wonderworld"

                Whether we fancy it or don't is not the question. At the present rate of global warming it is only a matter of when not if our progeny will inherit another flood.
                It would seem our current motto is `Apres nous le deluge" which is another way of saying "I'm alright Jack, you can pull up the ladder."

                Had this happened 160 odd years ago, a famous relative of mine may have successfully navigated the North West Passage through the Canadian archipelago..
                Rear Admiral Sir John Franklin of the Royal Navy was an ancestor on my mother's side of our family
                In his early naval career he took part at the Battle of Trafalgar.
                He was a national hero, who with 129 officers and men in two ships, the Erebus and the Terror,set sail from Greenhithe in Kent on May 19th 1845.
                He was never seen alive again although a whaling captain spotted the expedition off the cost of Baffin Land on July 26th of that year.
                Both ships were crushed by pack ice and although later, Eskimos (inuits) produced relics from the ships, not one soul returned to tell the tale of how all those men with enough food for three years
                succumbed to the frozen wastes of Canada.

                Recent news has revealed that, due to global warming, during a warm summer, ships may successfully make the passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific oceans through the previously invincible North West Passage.

                Apart from de-forestation of the rain forests around the world, I blame global warming on Nikolaus August Otto the German inventor of the first internal combustion engine inspired by the two Italian inventors, Eugenio Barsanti and Felice Matteucci, who patented the idea in London in 1854.

                Unless we lay claim to another planet to spoil with our wasteful lifestyle, the only hope for our great, great, great grandchildren is the discovery of a secret `Dryland' after the destruction of this globe at the end of WW4.

                Hope springs eternal etc.

                As always

                Wings

                Ps. In the meantime I might go ahead with my five hundred acres floating prison to house the ever-growing criminal fraternity who believe the rest of mankind owes them a living.















                --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@...> wrote:
                >
                > Sometimes reality follows fiction.
                >
                >
                > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Richard J. Bates" <icyimeir@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Do we really fancy another WaterWorld 'though?
                > > Movie goers would be casting their bread upon unrepentant waters. Wot?
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Hi Rod
                > > > Re. Boats too expensive to keep.
                > > > We have the same problem with fishing boats in UK.
                > > > Due to depleted fish stocks around our shores, fishermen are being offered substantial amounts to cut up their boats for scrap.
                > > > This is mainly down to an EU directive limiting the amount of fish we may catch.
                > > >
                > > > As to a story: There are endless possibilities. My first would be to securely fasten the boats together to make one large floating prison ship, to be anchored far enough off-shore that any bad lad would think more than twice before attempting an escape.
                > > > Assuming the boats on the periphery will receive the worse battering from the sea, those could be reserved for the unruly cons who would be fed on bread pudding and de-salinated sea water with no television or conjugal rights. For food, they can eat what they can catch from the sea.
                > > > One minor problem would be to employ staff not subject to mal de mer.
                > > > If a sufficient number of boats were to be used, perhaps there would be room for a heli-pad in the centre.
                > > >
                > > > Another idea would be to start a `Chicken Ranch' similar to the one outside Las Vegas, Nevada, where gentlemen could `relax' in the company of `ladies without inhibitions'.
                > > > This could be incorporated with the prison ship, for the use of Trusties and prison officers.
                > > >
                > > > Bags me for first Governor
                > > >
                > > > As always
                > > >
                > > > Wings
                > > > Ps. Re. "Would this end in madness?"
                > > > Quite possibly with me in charge.
                > > >
                > > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Wings,
                > > > >
                > > > > I saw this headline in the New York Times today:
                > > > >
                > > > > Boats Too Costly to Keep Are Littering Coastlines
                > > > >
                > > > > There has to be a ton of stories in that headline!
                > > > >
                > > > > Imagine some young people pull a bunch of floaters together and lash them. How would they get the fuel to move it around? Would they want to? Or would this grow into a communal party boat from which to make forays? Would this start as fun and end in madness?
                > > > >
                > > > > Rod
                > > > > aka albi
                > > > >
                > > > > http://www.geocities.com/neocoda
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • detectivetraininginstitute
                ... wings, I would say that once you have an idea, either stick to it or write it down anyway, so you never forget. _______ Lorri
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 4, 2009
                  --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Rod
                  > Re: "Do we really fancy another Wonderworld"
                  >
                  > Whether we fancy it or don't is not the question. At the present rate of global warming it is only a matter of when not if our progeny will inherit another flood.
                  > It would seem our current motto is `Apres nous le deluge" which is another way of saying "I'm alright Jack, you can pull up the ladder."
                  >
                  > Had this happened 160 odd years ago, a famous relative of mine may have successfully navigated the North West Passage through the Canadian archipelago..
                  > Rear Admiral Sir John Franklin of the Royal Navy was an ancestor on my mother's side of our family
                  > In his early naval career he took part at the Battle of Trafalgar.
                  > He was a national hero, who with 129 officers and men in two ships, the Erebus and the Terror,set sail from Greenhithe in Kent on May 19th 1845.
                  > He was never seen alive again although a whaling captain spotted the expedition off the cost of Baffin Land on July 26th of that year.
                  > Both ships were crushed by pack ice and although later, Eskimos (inuits) produced relics from the ships, not one soul returned to tell the tale of how all those men with enough food for three years
                  > succumbed to the frozen wastes of Canada.
                  >
                  > Recent news has revealed that, due to global warming, during a warm summer, ships may successfully make the passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific oceans through the previously invincible North West Passage.
                  >
                  > Apart from de-forestation of the rain forests around the world, I blame global warming on Nikolaus August Otto the German inventor of the first internal combustion engine inspired by the two Italian inventors, Eugenio Barsanti and Felice Matteucci, who patented the idea in London in 1854.
                  >
                  > Unless we lay claim to another planet to spoil with our wasteful lifestyle, the only hope for our great, great, great grandchildren is the discovery of a secret `Dryland' after the destruction of this globe at the end of WW4.
                  >
                  > Hope springs eternal etc.
                  >
                  > As always
                  >
                  > Wings
                  >
                  > Ps. In the meantime I might go ahead with my five hundred acres floating prison to house the ever-growing criminal fraternity who believe the rest of mankind owes them a living.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Sometimes reality follows fiction.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Richard J. Bates" <icyimeir@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Do we really fancy another WaterWorld 'though?
                  > > > Movie goers would be casting their bread upon unrepentant waters. Wot?
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Hi Rod
                  > > > > Re. Boats too expensive to keep.
                  > > > > We have the same problem with fishing boats in UK.
                  > > > > Due to depleted fish stocks around our shores, fishermen are being offered substantial amounts to cut up their boats for scrap.
                  > > > > This is mainly down to an EU directive limiting the amount of fish we may catch.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > As to a story: There are endless possibilities. My first would be to securely fasten the boats together to make one large floating prison ship, to be anchored far enough off-shore that any bad lad would think more than twice before attempting an escape.
                  > > > > Assuming the boats on the periphery will receive the worse battering from the sea, those could be reserved for the unruly cons who would be fed on bread pudding and de-salinated sea water with no television or conjugal rights. For food, they can eat what they can catch from the sea.
                  > > > > One minor problem would be to employ staff not subject to mal de mer.
                  > > > > If a sufficient number of boats were to be used, perhaps there would be room for a heli-pad in the centre.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Another idea would be to start a `Chicken Ranch' similar to the one outside Las Vegas, Nevada, where gentlemen could `relax' in the company of `ladies without inhibitions'.
                  > > > > This could be incorporated with the prison ship, for the use of Trusties and prison officers.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Bags me for first Governor
                  > > > >
                  > > > > As always
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Wings
                  > > > > Ps. Re. "Would this end in madness?"
                  > > > > Quite possibly with me in charge.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Wings,
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > I saw this headline in the New York Times today:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Boats Too Costly to Keep Are Littering Coastlines
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > There has to be a ton of stories in that headline!
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Imagine some young people pull a bunch of floaters together and lash them. How would they get the fuel to move it around? Would they want to? Or would this grow into a communal party boat from which to make forays? Would this start as fun and end in madness?
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Rod
                  > > > > > aka albi
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > http://www.geocities.com/neocoda
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                  wings,
                  I would say that once you have an idea, either stick to it or write it down anyway, so you never forget.

                  _______
                  Lorri
                • Manfred
                  Didn t you Poms try that once before? And didn t the social detritus end up beating you lot in cricket, then go on to be a World force in sports and many
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 5, 2009
                    Didn't you Poms try that once before? And didn't the social 'detritus' end up beating you lot in cricket, then go on to be a World force in sports and many other things besides????

                    Cheers,

                    Manfred.

                    > As to a story: There are endless possibilities. My first would be to securely fasten the boats together to make one large floating prison ship, to be anchored far enough off-shore that any bad lad would think more than twice before attempting an escape.
                    > Bags me for first Governor
                    > As always
                    > Wings
                    > Ps. Re. "Would this end in madness?"
                    > Quite possibly with me in charge.
                  • wings081
                    Hi Manfred I have one thing to say to you my friend: Harold Larwood 1932-33 Ashes test series which caused such a furore among the Australian teams with the
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 5, 2009
                      Hi Manfred
                      I have one thing to say to you my friend: Harold Larwood 1932-33 Ashes test series which caused such a furore among the Australian teams with the Bodyline Bowling attributed to Larwood.
                      It was used to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Don Bradman, Knight of the realm and every English boys cricketing hero. It could be said that Sir Don Bradman was the original Wizard of Oz.

                      Larwood's type of delivery was so successful, yet considered dangerous, that it changed the laws of cricket and Law 42 thereafter includes:
                      "The bowling of fast short balls is dangerous and unfair if the umpire at the bowler's end considers by repetition and taking into account their length, height and direction, they are likely to inflict physical injury to the striker"

                      I have many good friends and family in Australia whom I petition to forgive us our sins of the bad old days. We are proud to include you in our commonwealth of nations but please leave our monarchy alone.

                      God Save The Queen

                      As always

                      Wings.







                      --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Manfred" <r_u_sirius2@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Didn't you Poms try that once before? And didn't the social 'detritus' end up beating you lot in cricket, then go on to be a World force in sports and many other things besides????
                      >
                      > Cheers,
                      >
                      > Manfred.
                      >
                      > > As to a story: There are endless possibilities. My first would be to securely fasten the boats together to make one large floating prison ship, to be anchored far enough off-shore that any bad lad would think more than twice before attempting an escape.
                      > > Bags me for first Governor
                      > > As always
                      > > Wings
                      > > Ps. Re. "Would this end in madness?"
                      > > Quite possibly with me in charge.
                      >
                    • Manfred
                      ... ahhh yes, played the man instead of the game ... a sad day indeed. However I think that Oz has performed rather well, no matter what the World (or Poms)
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 8, 2009
                        ... ahhh yes, played the man instead of the game ... a sad day indeed. However I think that Oz has performed rather well, no matter what the World (or Poms) throw at us. ... :o)

                        Hope you're still travelling well?

                        Cheers,

                        Manfred.

                        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Manfred
                        > I have one thing to say to you my friend: Harold Larwood 1932-33 Ashes test series which caused such a furore among the Australian teams with the Bodyline Bowling attributed to Larwood.
                      • wings081
                        Hi Manfred. Re Played the man instead of the game I agree with you on that point. I lose interest in a team whose tactics are aimed at injuring the
                        Message 11 of 11 , Apr 8, 2009
                          Hi Manfred.
                          Re "Played the man instead of the game"
                          I agree with you on that point.
                          I lose interest in a team whose tactics are aimed at injuring the opposition to gain an advantage.In my book, that's not cricket.

                          The words of Granny (Grantland Rice) spring to mind:

                          "For when the great scorer comes
                          To write against your name
                          He marks- not how you won or lost
                          But how you played the game"

                          As always


                          Wings


                          --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Manfred" <r_u_sirius2@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > ... ahhh yes, played the man instead of the game ... a sad day indeed. However I think that Oz has performed rather well, no matter what the World (or Poms) throw at us. ... :o)
                          >
                          > Hope you're still travelling well?
                          >
                          > Cheers,
                          >
                          > Manfred.
                          >
                          > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hi Manfred
                          > > I have one thing to say to you my friend: Harold Larwood 1932-33 Ashes test series which caused such a furore among the Australian teams with the Bodyline Bowling attributed to Larwood.
                          >
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