Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [ticket2write] Stolen Moments

Expand Messages
  • David Roth
    Susan, This is powerful on a visceral level. Well worded, and well crafted, and highly emotive. I m certain that there are not a few of us who in retrospect
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 1, 2008
      Susan,

      This is powerful on a visceral level. Well worded, and well crafted, and
      highly emotive. I'm certain that there are not a few of us who in
      retrospect would now, in the autumn of our lives gladly exchange passing
      moments of frivolous pleasure for the comfort of hearth, home...and
      grandchildren. Well done.

      My only criticism is that I would exchange 'in ' to 'on' in the third line.

      Dave

      -----Original Message-----
      From: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ticket2write@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of Susan Donahue
      Sent: Friday, October 31, 2008 10:15 AM
      To: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [ticket2write] Stolen Moments


      Stolen Moments

      She was the sort of girl who could not say, "no."
      which greatly enhanced her attraction
      in those distant days and nights
      when there was a mad dash
      for liberation.
      She enjoyed the company
      of older men, married or not,
      for brief encounters
      and prolonged affairs
      of the heart.
      The key to eternal pleasure
      she discovered
      was the constant
      renewal of lovers
      whom she changed
      nearly as often as the sheets.
      Then the time came in her life
      when those she once loved
      began to appear in obituaries.
      She remembered the treasured
      rendezvous, the roses
      and heart-felt poetry,
      the pleasures of the flesh
      and the quickened pulses
      but began to cry
      when she read the names
      of children and grandchildren,
      none of whom were hers.



      ------------------------------------

      Learn more about ticket2wite at http://ticket2write.orgYahoo! Groups Links



      No virus found in this incoming message.
      Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
      Version: 8.0.175 / Virus Database: 270.8.5/1758 - Release Date: 10/31/2008
      8:22 AM
    • Susan Donahue
      Dear Jerry, Me thinks you are too modest. Thank you for the kind words, but don t under estimate yourself. You have the power to shake the tree with your own
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 1, 2008
        Dear Jerry,

        Me thinks you are too modest. Thank you for the kind words, but
        don't under estimate yourself. You have the power to shake the tree
        with your own words.

        Suzianne

        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jerry5849@...> wrote:
        >
        > Wow Suzianne,
        > Just when I think it's safe to begin posting again, you clobber me
        > with such a wonderful piece of work. I find I'm hard pressed to
        live
        > up to the high standards you set, but I shall try. (lol) Thank you
        > for this piece Suzi. I love the flow of it as well as the images
        you
        > paint. Well done!
        > As always,
        > Jerry
        >
        > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue"
        > <suzianne411@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Stolen Moments
        > >
        > > She was the sort of girl who could not say, "no."
        > > which greatly enhanced her attraction
        > > in those distant days and nights
        > > when there was a mad dash
        > > for liberation.
        > > She enjoyed the company
        > > of older men, married or not,
        > > for brief encounters
        > > and prolonged affairs
        > > of the heart.
        > > The key to eternal pleasure
        > > she discovered
        > > was the constant
        > > renewal of lovers
        > > whom she changed
        > > nearly as often as the sheets.
        > > Then the time came in her life
        > > when those she once loved
        > > began to appear in obituaries.
        > > She remembered the treasured
        > > rendezvous, the roses
        > > and heart-felt poetry,
        > > the pleasures of the flesh
        > > and the quickened pulses
        > > but began to cry
        > > when she read the names
        > > of children and grandchildren,
        > > none of whom were hers.
        > >
        >
      • Susan Donahue
        Yikes! I think you over-thought this by a mile. I am not passing judgment, just observing that a woman of her generation who was beautiful and bright and
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 1, 2008
          Yikes! I think you over-thought this by a mile. I am not passing
          judgment, just observing that a woman of her generation who was
          beautiful and bright and perpetually in love, with one man or
          another, has reached an age where her old lovers are dying off and
          she has only beautiful memories, and she is faced with the truth that
          their lives were filled with more lasting relationships than the ones
          they shared with her.

          Suzianne


          --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "goddessinbluejeans"
          <goddessinbluejeans@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear Susan:
          >
          > This poem "walks on the wild side" of the sordid and base type of
          > relationships by "some women". It is interesting...but I don't get
          > the entire work, I did enjoy it! I was "feeling it" until the last
          > line when I became a wee bit confused;
          >
          > when she read the names
          > > of children and grandchildren,
          > > none of whom were hers.
          > >
          > I get the idea, this woman was a "gold digger" type (I could think
          > of another word for this woman...)who was "too busy" to have kids
          or
          > whatever, and then she goes out with married or divorced guys and
          > raises their kids not her own. Isn't she sort of like one step away
          > from being a "lady of the evening".
          > Stolen moments, meaning Stolen by stealing men? Also stolen moments
          > thinking about what she lost, children. But if she has other men's
          > kids then they would sort of be her own, if she showed motherly
          love
          > to them. Am I getting the point? Sorry for my lack of understanding
          > this. Good thing I'm not like that, but I dont like moralizing too
          > much! This is a departure from your usual type work. Are you
          breaking
          > new ground here, stretching your wings? :)gibj--- In
          > ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue" <suzianne411@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Stolen Moments
          > >
          > > She was the sort of girl who could not say, "no."
          > > which greatly enhanced her attraction
          > > in those distant days and nights
          > > when there was a mad dash
          > > for liberation.
          > > She enjoyed the company
          > > of older men, married or not,
          > > for brief encounters
          > > and prolonged affairs
          > > of the heart.
          > > The key to eternal pleasure
          > > she discovered
          > > was the constant
          > > renewal of lovers
          > > whom she changed
          > > nearly as often as the sheets.
          > > Then the time came in her life
          > > when those she once loved
          > > began to appear in obituaries.
          > > She remembered the treasured
          > > rendezvous, the roses
          > > and heart-felt poetry,
          > > the pleasures of the flesh
          > > and the quickened pulses
          > > but began to cry
          > > when she read the names
          > > of children and grandchildren,
          > > none of whom were hers.
          > >
          >
        • Susan Donahue
          Dear Jerry...You got it! But, I am not surprised. There is a little of the flower-child in you and the people who came of age when you did, so you can
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 1, 2008
            Dear Jerry...You got it! But, I am not surprised. There is a little
            of the flower-child in you and the people who came of age when you
            did, so you can relate.

            Suzianne

            --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jerry5849@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dear Gibj,
            > Perhaps each reader picks up a different meaning from a piece. It
            > would seem so in this instance for I don't see this woman as
            a "gold
            > digger," but rather a free spirit in a time when lots of young
            people
            > were chanting "make love, not war." In this sense, I don't view
            the
            > woman's relationships as "sordid" or "base."
            > As we pass through life we often look back and regret certain
            > things. I don't believe this woman regretted having the
            > relationships she had, but rather she finally saw some of the
            things
            > which only long term relationships can give, and I don't mean
            > children necessarily, but family.
            > I see this as a bittersweet portrait of a woman looking over her
            life
            > and seeing the wonderful things it brought as well as the
            misfortunes
            > her choices brought.
            > As Alfred Lord Tennyson said,
            > "I hold it true, whate'er befall;
            > I feel it, when I sorrow most;
            > 'Tis better to have loved and lost
            > Than never to have loved at all."
            > As always,
            > Jerry
            >
            >
            > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "goddessinbluejeans"
            > <goddessinbluejeans@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear Susan:
            > >
            > > This poem "walks on the wild side" of the sordid and base type of
            > > relationships by "some women". It is interesting...but I don't
            get
            > > the entire work, I did enjoy it! I was "feeling it" until the
            last
            > > line when I became a wee bit confused;
            > >
            > > when she read the names
            > > > of children and grandchildren,
            > > > none of whom were hers.
            > > >
            > > I get the idea, this woman was a "gold digger" type (I could
            think
            > > of another word for this woman...)who was "too busy" to have kids
            > or
            > > whatever, and then she goes out with married or divorced guys and
            > > raises their kids not her own. Isn't she sort of like one step
            away
            > > from being a "lady of the evening".
            > > Stolen moments, meaning Stolen by stealing men? Also stolen
            moments
            > > thinking about what she lost, children. But if she has other
            men's
            > > kids then they would sort of be her own, if she showed motherly
            > love
            > > to them. Am I getting the point? Sorry for my lack of
            understanding
            > > this. Good thing I'm not like that, but I dont like moralizing
            too
            > > much! This is a departure from your usual type work. Are you
            > breaking
            > > new ground here, stretching your wings? :)gibj--- In
            > > ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue" <suzianne411@>
            wrote:
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Stolen Moments
            > > >
            > > > She was the sort of girl who could not say, "no."
            > > > which greatly enhanced her attraction
            > > > in those distant days and nights
            > > > when there was a mad dash
            > > > for liberation.
            > > > She enjoyed the company
            > > > of older men, married or not,
            > > > for brief encounters
            > > > and prolonged affairs
            > > > of the heart.
            > > > The key to eternal pleasure
            > > > she discovered
            > > > was the constant
            > > > renewal of lovers
            > > > whom she changed
            > > > nearly as often as the sheets.
            > > > Then the time came in her life
            > > > when those she once loved
            > > > began to appear in obituaries.
            > > > She remembered the treasured
            > > > rendezvous, the roses
            > > > and heart-felt poetry,
            > > > the pleasures of the flesh
            > > > and the quickened pulses
            > > > but began to cry
            > > > when she read the names
            > > > of children and grandchildren,
            > > > none of whom were hers.
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Dudley Hiles
            Loved it..... D ... From: Susan Donahue Subject: [ticket2write] Stolen Moments To: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com Date: Friday, October
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 2, 2008
              Loved it.....
              D

              --- On Fri, 10/31/08, Susan Donahue <suzianne411@...> wrote:
              From: Susan Donahue <suzianne411@...>
              Subject: [ticket2write] Stolen Moments
              To: ticket2write@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Friday, October 31, 2008, 9:14 AM


              Stolen Moments

              She was the sort of girl who could not say, "no."
              which greatly enhanced her attraction
              in those distant days and nights
              when there was a mad dash
              for liberation.
              She enjoyed the company
              of older men, married or not,
              for brief encounters
              and prolonged affairs
              of the heart.
              The key to eternal pleasure
              she discovered
              was the constant
              renewal of lovers
              whom she changed
              nearly as often as the sheets.
              Then the time came in her life
              when those she once loved
              began to appear in obituaries.
              She remembered the treasured
              rendezvous, the roses
              and heart-felt poetry,
              the pleasures of the flesh
              and the quickened pulses
              but began to cry
              when she read the names
              of children and grandchildren,
              none of whom were hers.


            • goddessinbluejeans
              Dear Susan: Now I get how stealth-like in surgical execution this work - which is brilliant! The line; when there was a mad dash ... is clearly the 60 s
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 9, 2008
                Dear Susan: Now I get how stealth-like in surgical execution this
                work - which is brilliant! The line;

                when there was a mad dash
                > for liberation

                is clearly the 60's diatribe of free love. Just under the cusp of
                those wanton loverly ways, I suppose I didnt catch on! Duh! Well now
                I do, and can read this work in a whole new light. Thank-you for your
                tutorial! Love the Wordsworth quote; "love and lost". Still the
                grandchildren just didn't get there by taking too many bc pills!
                Maybe blame minovral! :)gibj


                --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue"
                <suzianne411@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Stolen Moments
                >
                > She was the sort of girl who could not say, "no."
                > which greatly enhanced her attraction
                > in those distant days and nights
                > when there was a mad dash
                > for liberation.
                > She enjoyed the company
                > of older men, married or not,
                > for brief encounters
                > and prolonged affairs
                > of the heart.
                > The key to eternal pleasure
                > she discovered
                > was the constant
                > renewal of lovers
                > whom she changed
                > nearly as often as the sheets.
                > Then the time came in her life
                > when those she once loved
                > began to appear in obituaries.
                > She remembered the treasured
                > rendezvous, the roses
                > and heart-felt poetry,
                > the pleasures of the flesh
                > and the quickened pulses
                > but began to cry
                > when she read the names
                > of children and grandchildren,
                > none of whom were hers.
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.