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Re: Tell don't show? Please Show!

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  • goddessinbluejeans
    Dear Susan: Glad you caught that one! GIBJ--- In ... Americans ... rule ... feel ... am ... Their ... jealousy ... to ... their ... chuckling ... coupe ...
    Message 1 of 17 , Aug 6, 2008
      Dear Susan: Glad you caught that one! GIBJ--- In
      ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue" <suzianne411@...> wrote:
      >
      > Apparently, some WHO struggle with grammar are fighting a losing
      > battle.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "goddessinbluejeans"
      > <goddessinbluejeans@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Dear Douglas and Wings and All Those Whom Struggle With Grammar:
      > > Astute observations Douglas! Of course that is why writers, poets
      > > included, hire editors and the like ilk!
      > > We live in North America, free from the Victorian restraints of
      > > absolutes and correct grammatical etiquette and/or usage.
      Americans
      > > and North Americans, Canadians included. do not feel the extreme
      > > angst like the Brits do in regards to the annoying grammatical
      rule
      > > breaking. The Britians, known as the English, are the famed heart
      > of
      > > the Lion and Unicorn hierarchial establishment are so keen on
      > > pursuing grammar as The Most Important Feature Of English Usage.
      > > In some ways, I agree; grammar as a psuedo-science is very
      > important.
      > > Douglas, when we make our usual grammatical errors can you not
      feel
      > > those aberrant and bristled hairs standing up on the mustache of
      > > Wings' elogated British stiff upper lip? His strong British chin
      > > precipitously jutting over his computer keyboard as he gasps in
      > > horror? Me too!
      > > Similiar to the much more than annoying scrapping on the
      > blackboard,
      > > the proverbial school marm, Wings, is perhaps much inclined to
      > survey
      > > each and every word of ours and its extraordinary consequential
      > > errors of the worst kind. An incredibly daunting task, but one I
      am
      > > sure Wings can perform with extraordinary aptitude. "Oh no, not
      > > another dangling participle!
      > > Yes, words matter, but is there not the freedom of speech to make
      > the
      > > occasional error in grammar especially in Great Britian? Wouldst
      > the
      > > Queen herself be standing over the dear Wings surveying all the
      > world
      > > and all that is in it? What is with this fixation? Is there no
      > sense
      > > of freedom or at least, artistic license to err on the side of
      > > expression, or the creative need to express oneself indelibly
      > without
      > > grammar rules pounding on the right side of the creative brain?
      > > I beleive I received my crackerjack box of nonconventional wisdom
      > > from the Americans. Yes, I admire their writers and history.
      Their
      > > freedoms and their almond joy chocolate bars.Perhaps it is
      jealousy
      > > of my British cousins, but I do prefer the freedom of being able
      to
      > > express first, edit later. Are feelings edited out of the context
      > of
      > > correct grammatical equation in English literary works? Do these
      > > stiff rules create a collective binding of corsets and minds?
      > > Americans did not throw their tea into the Boston harbour for no
      > good
      > > reason. Grammar rules were driving them insane!
      > > Yes, as much as the Brits like to correct Americans poor
      > grammatical
      > > sense of the world, they are also more likely to sit back in
      their
      > > winged-back chairs in their stuffy country clubs secretly
      chuckling
      > > under their breath about their supremacy of the English as a
      coupe
      > > d'etate and relish and langish in their domination of this
      language
      > > field. Scholars checkmate!
      > > And yes, we, as North Americans are more likely to dismiss the
      > > restrictive constraints of the grammatical chastity belt, as far
      as
      > > writing is concerned, social issues aside, semantics another
      issue
      > > altogether!
      > > Canada, once the minion of redcoats and covered ankles
      puritanical
      > > ethics, often could hold its own in regards to the Oxford's
      English
      > > grammar rules. Canadians, an odd admixture of peasant and royalty
      > > would be best described as "Victorian wannabes". No matter how
      > > sublimated we became by the glove to the face in the grammar
      duel,
      > we
      > > were nevertheless polite when we accepted the writerly
      challenge.
      > > How absolutely necessary the correct grammatical format, I
      believe
      > > this is true today as well.
      > > Nose wrinkling becoming an art form, Canadians are not immune to
      > > wrinkle said nose in disguist at the excessive rules constricting
      > > their free flow of words.
      > > It is true, Canadians rebelled, forever to be remembered as the
      > > nation that prefixes all sentences with "Eh?". This slobberly
      > edifice
      > > of a non-word confounds and bemoans my sense of propriety to
      > correct
      > > English usage. For this reason I am trying to move back to jolly
      > old
      > > England. Move over Wings!
      > > Those much dreaded "faux pas" incidents of dear Wings
      > conflagarative
      > > premptive essay bespeaks of the need for grammar as sanity versus
      > > insanity. Without the building blocks of the English language
      dear
      > > Wings believes we will all fall down, grammatically speaking.
      With
      > > clauses here and there and no one to pick up after the horribilus
      > > mess.
      > > Rule Britianica or should it be Rules Britianica? Douglas, I did
      > > check my nose, it does wrinkle! It looks like the question mark
      > > man... I should send a pic to confirm this fact or Wings will not
      > > accept this allegory!
      > > This reminds me of my dear, sweet, yet cruel grammar teacher with
      > her
      > > nosey twitch. Or is this burnt cranial image really Sir Wings
      > waiting
      > > in the wings to smack my wrists with the ruler of grammatical
      > > correctness? Excusez the pun, dear wings! Al. in beau geste!
      > > Although, I believe I had missed many Grade 8 grammar classes due
      > to
      > > illness of a faking sort, I remember a boy named Scott who could
      > whip
      > > all our collective (should I be correct here or go for the Yankee
      > > gusto?)butt of the studentiary and take the first prize for
      > > being "grammatically correct" student sum gratia. Where is Scott
      > now
      > > when I need him? He is probably a professional banker with oddles
      > of
      > > cash. Paying attention to grammar rules obviously pays great
      > > dividends. Why did I not learn from Soott or at least learn by
      > proxy
      > > by dating him once or twice?
      > > Please point out my grammatical errors and my poor spelling and
      > > punctionation, I kind of fancy the tickle to the wrist! Ouchez!
      > GIBJ--
      > > - In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "douglas.ryan68"
      > > <douglas.ryan68@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Sorry for not letting the issue die, but this is something I've
      > > been
      > > > thinking of at work. There have been times when I've read how
      > > > characters "wrinkled his/her nose" when the author is trying to
      > > > "show" the character's reaction to what's happening or what the
      > > other
      > > > character says. First of, and a relatively minor point is that
      > > noses
      > > > don't wrinkle! I tried myself in the mirror and it doesn't
      work,
      > > the
      > > > bit between the eyes furrows and the nostrils flare, but the
      nose
      > > > itself is inflexible cartilage that won't wrinkle. So when
      > showing,
      > > I
      > > > guess make sure that the "shown" reaction is physically
      something
      > > > actually happens and even can happen. However, a bigger point
      is
      > > that
      > > > sometimes the reader has a completely different idea what
      > > the "shown"
      > > > reaction (or even the series of events, etc) even means then
      the
      > > > author does. There have been times when I thought wrinkling the
      > > nose
      > > > was supposed to be a cute reaction, but the author took umbrage
      > to
      > > > that opinion and informed me otherwise.
      > > >
      > > > Today I finished reading "A Confederacy of Dunces" and towards
      > the
      > > > end there was a bit of telling that something along the
      > lines "Mr.
      > > > Levy watched the anger and frustration play on his wife's
      face."
      > > That
      > > > might not be exactly how it went, but the point is that was
      > telling
      > > > that I feel was more effective then the "showing" of what her
      > lips,
      > > > eyes, wrinkling nose, etc did. I found my imagination was more
      > > > engaged by the telling then the author leading through
      > > the "showing."
      > > > That made it all the more satisfying to read. So in the case
      > > telling
      > > > worked quite well.
      > > >
      > > > If Vincent van Gogh had listened to an art teacher to the
      letter
      > to
      > > > use such and such size brush to paint such and such scenes and
      > > never
      > > > use knives to paint, we would never of had is masterpieces.
      It's
      > > the
      > > > same with writing. I can agree that one should know the
      > conventions
      > > > and grammar, but sometimes you need to trust your artistic
      > > instincts
      > > > when the rules and stock advice needs to be broken.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "writing_queen_2007"
      > > > <writing_queen_2007@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Your absolutly right. I read a book, don't remember the
      tittle,
      > > but
      > > > > they explained that telling can be better then showwing, vice
      > > versa.
      > > > > You can alsways combine them as well.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "douglas.ryan68"
      > > > > <douglas.ryan68@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > The advice, "Show don't tell" is oft repeated like a mantra
      > in
      > > > > > writer's circles. However, is telling instead of showing
      > better
      > > > in
      > > > > > some cases. The prose is often more efficient with the word
      > > count
      > > > and
      > > > > > narrative moves faster. Greats such as Charles Dickens
      > > told, "It
      > > > was
      > > > > > the best of times. It was the worst of times." That's
      > certainly
      > > > > > telling. CS Lewis does a fair bit of telling in his
      > Chronicles
      > > of
      > > > > > Narnia. Show is usually prefered, but telling is sometimes
      > > better.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > So am I nuts? Are you gathering wood to burn the heretic at
      > the
      > > > stake?
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Douglas
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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