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Re: Reader in the Bookstore Window (Albi)

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  • Susan Donahue
    Dear Rod, Through the magic of the internet and Mapquest, I found that place and even located photographs. http://www.urban75.org/london/goodwins-court.html
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 31, 2007
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      Dear Rod,

      Through the magic of the internet and Mapquest, I found that place
      and even located photographs.

      http://www.urban75.org/london/goodwins-court.html

      The window in the picture of Goodwins Court in London is the very one
      I thought of when I read your poem!

      With your permission, I think I will write that story. Let's see
      what develops.

      Suzianne


      --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Suzianne,
      >
      > Have fun with it!
      >
      > Let me know what develops.
      >
      > Rod
      > aka albi
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jumpingstones/
      >
      >
      > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue" <suzianne411@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Dear Albi,
      > >
      > > Wow! This is fun. My mind is racing with ideas for a story to
      go
      > > with this poem. Have you considered that idea? You could open
      with
      > > this as sort of a prologue, then launch into a story about a
      woman
      > > out of her own place and time. I have one particular bookstore
      > > window in mind. It is in a georgian passageway near Covant
      Garden.
      > > I don't remember the name of the place. It is not wide enough to
      be
      > > a street, but is well traveled by pedestrians. When I last
      passed
      > > that way, the display in the bookstore window contained some very
      old
      > > books about the slave trade. That is an image that bothered me
      for a
      > > long time. Now that I think of it, it could have been a good
      story
      > > idea.
      > >
      > > Thank you for posting this. It is making me think.
      > >
      > > Suzianne
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Reader in the Bookstore Window
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Reflections through multiple glass panes.
      > > >
      > > > What is visible beyond the glass competes with what is behind
      me
      > > and
      > > >
      > > > what is off at an obtuse angle.
      > > >
      > > > Are these like layers to an onion?
      > > >
      > > > The stores on the other side of the street.
      > > >
      > > > The groups silhouetted in their trundling down the sidewalk.
      > > >
      > > > These are around me.
      > > >
      > > > But most disturbing
      > > > there is a woman reading in the deepest image.
      > > >
      > > > She is dressed in holiday Victorian garb.
      > > >
      > > > Is she a ghost mannequin?
      > > >
      > > > No! She breathes. Her eyes sweep the lines.
      > > >
      > > > Are these images like the pages of a book?
      > > >
      > > > Some are fading like the previous page's scene?
      > > >
      > > > Some are faint fore-shadows of scenes to be?
      > > >
      > > > As she and I read together,
      > > >
      > > > my snowy street scape is her outside.
      > > >
      > > > Her old chair is the envy of my concrete beaten, slush sodden
      feet.
      > > >
      > > > That's it, turn the page, madam, if you please
      > > >
      > > > and see if I encounter a pickpocket
      > > >
      > > > or a billy club twirling officer of the law.
      > > >
      > > > I sure am glad I wore my tweed cap
      > > >
      > > > so if you glance up
      > > >
      > > > you won't faint in shock
      > > >
      > > > from realizing you've switched centuries
      > > >
      > > > instantaneously.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Rod
      > > > aka albi
      > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jumpingstones/
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • albiaicehouse
      Suzianne, Even over the internet, Goodwins Court has a wonderful atmosphere and feeling. You can see the store that was part of the inspiration for my poem in
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 1, 2008
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        Suzianne,

        Even over the internet, Goodwins Court has a wonderful atmosphere and
        feeling.

        You can see the store that was part of the inspiration for my poem in
        this photo:

        http://www.marketblockbooks.com/mbb_about.html

        You can see the chair, missing the woman in Victorian garb, here:

        http://stanleyreads.blogspot.com/

        I suppose that cardboard silhouette is a mannequin, of sorts, heehee!

        The book store management put her there to thank all those who sat
        there for an hour each during the holiday shopping season.

        But I can't wait to see YOUR story. You sure have a winner of a
        location in your vision!

        Rod
        aka albi

        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue" <suzianne411@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Dear Rod,
        >
        > Through the magic of the internet and Mapquest, I found that place
        > and even located photographs.
        >
        > http://www.urban75.org/london/goodwins-court.html
        >
        > The window in the picture of Goodwins Court in London is the very one
        > I thought of when I read your poem!
        >
        > With your permission, I think I will write that story. Let's see
        > what develops.
        >
        > Suzianne
        >
        >
        > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Suzianne,
        > >
        > > Have fun with it!
        > >
        > > Let me know what develops.
        > >
        > > Rod
        > > aka albi
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jumpingstones/
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue" <suzianne411@>
        > > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Dear Albi,
        > > >
        > > > Wow! This is fun. My mind is racing with ideas for a story to
        > go
        > > > with this poem. Have you considered that idea? You could open
        > with
        > > > this as sort of a prologue, then launch into a story about a
        > woman
        > > > out of her own place and time. I have one particular bookstore
        > > > window in mind. It is in a georgian passageway near Covant
        > Garden.
        > > > I don't remember the name of the place. It is not wide enough to
        > be
        > > > a street, but is well traveled by pedestrians. When I last
        > passed
        > > > that way, the display in the bookstore window contained some very
        > old
        > > > books about the slave trade. That is an image that bothered me
        > for a
        > > > long time. Now that I think of it, it could have been a good
        > story
        > > > idea.
        > > >
        > > > Thank you for posting this. It is making me think.
        > > >
        > > > Suzianne
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@>
        > > > wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Reader in the Bookstore Window
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Reflections through multiple glass panes.
        > > > >
        > > > > What is visible beyond the glass competes with what is behind
        > me
        > > > and
        > > > >
        > > > > what is off at an obtuse angle.
        > > > >
        > > > > Are these like layers to an onion?
        > > > >
        > > > > The stores on the other side of the street.
        > > > >
        > > > > The groups silhouetted in their trundling down the sidewalk.
        > > > >
        > > > > These are around me.
        > > > >
        > > > > But most disturbing
        > > > > there is a woman reading in the deepest image.
        > > > >
        > > > > She is dressed in holiday Victorian garb.
        > > > >
        > > > > Is she a ghost mannequin?
        > > > >
        > > > > No! She breathes. Her eyes sweep the lines.
        > > > >
        > > > > Are these images like the pages of a book?
        > > > >
        > > > > Some are fading like the previous page's scene?
        > > > >
        > > > > Some are faint fore-shadows of scenes to be?
        > > > >
        > > > > As she and I read together,
        > > > >
        > > > > my snowy street scape is her outside.
        > > > >
        > > > > Her old chair is the envy of my concrete beaten, slush sodden
        > feet.
        > > > >
        > > > > That's it, turn the page, madam, if you please
        > > > >
        > > > > and see if I encounter a pickpocket
        > > > >
        > > > > or a billy club twirling officer of the law.
        > > > >
        > > > > I sure am glad I wore my tweed cap
        > > > >
        > > > > so if you glance up
        > > > >
        > > > > you won't faint in shock
        > > > >
        > > > > from realizing you've switched centuries
        > > > >
        > > > > instantaneously.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Rod
        > > > > aka albi
        > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jumpingstones/
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Susan Donahue
        Dear Rod, It is amazing to see how things connect. A bookstore owner s clever idea, seen through a glass, percolated in one mind, restructured into words,
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 1, 2008
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          Dear Rod,

          It is amazing to see how things connect. A bookstore owner's clever
          idea, seen through a glass, percolated in one mind, restructured into
          words, rendered as a poem, transmitted by electrical impulses through
          time and space, read and considered by another mind that wanders back
          to another place and a faint memory re-illuminated...etc.

          Anyway, the spark has traveled. Now, I feel obligated to pass it
          along. Give me time and watch here for the results.

          Suzianne


          --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Suzianne,
          >
          > Even over the internet, Goodwins Court has a wonderful atmosphere
          and
          > feeling.
          >
          > You can see the store that was part of the inspiration for my poem
          in
          > this photo:
          >
          > http://www.marketblockbooks.com/mbb_about.html
          >
          > You can see the chair, missing the woman in Victorian garb, here:
          >
          > http://stanleyreads.blogspot.com/
          >
          > I suppose that cardboard silhouette is a mannequin, of sorts,
          heehee!
          >
          > The book store management put her there to thank all those who sat
          > there for an hour each during the holiday shopping season.
          >
          > But I can't wait to see YOUR story. You sure have a winner of a
          > location in your vision!
          >
          > Rod
          > aka albi
          >
          > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue" <suzianne411@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Dear Rod,
          > >
          > > Through the magic of the internet and Mapquest, I found that
          place
          > > and even located photographs.
          > >
          > > http://www.urban75.org/london/goodwins-court.html
          > >
          > > The window in the picture of Goodwins Court in London is the very
          one
          > > I thought of when I read your poem!
          > >
          > > With your permission, I think I will write that story. Let's see
          > > what develops.
          > >
          > > Suzianne
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@>
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Suzianne,
          > > >
          > > > Have fun with it!
          > > >
          > > > Let me know what develops.
          > > >
          > > > Rod
          > > > aka albi
          > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jumpingstones/
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue"
          <suzianne411@>
          > > > wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Dear Albi,
          > > > >
          > > > > Wow! This is fun. My mind is racing with ideas for a story
          to
          > > go
          > > > > with this poem. Have you considered that idea? You could
          open
          > > with
          > > > > this as sort of a prologue, then launch into a story about a
          > > woman
          > > > > out of her own place and time. I have one particular
          bookstore
          > > > > window in mind. It is in a georgian passageway near Covant
          > > Garden.
          > > > > I don't remember the name of the place. It is not wide
          enough to
          > > be
          > > > > a street, but is well traveled by pedestrians. When I last
          > > passed
          > > > > that way, the display in the bookstore window contained some
          very
          > > old
          > > > > books about the slave trade. That is an image that bothered
          me
          > > for a
          > > > > long time. Now that I think of it, it could have been a good
          > > story
          > > > > idea.
          > > > >
          > > > > Thank you for posting this. It is making me think.
          > > > >
          > > > > Suzianne
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse
          <no_reply@>
          > > > > wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Reader in the Bookstore Window
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Reflections through multiple glass panes.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > What is visible beyond the glass competes with what is
          behind
          > > me
          > > > > and
          > > > > >
          > > > > > what is off at an obtuse angle.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Are these like layers to an onion?
          > > > > >
          > > > > > The stores on the other side of the street.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > The groups silhouetted in their trundling down the sidewalk.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > These are around me.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > But most disturbing
          > > > > > there is a woman reading in the deepest image.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > She is dressed in holiday Victorian garb.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Is she a ghost mannequin?
          > > > > >
          > > > > > No! She breathes. Her eyes sweep the lines.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Are these images like the pages of a book?
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Some are fading like the previous page's scene?
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Some are faint fore-shadows of scenes to be?
          > > > > >
          > > > > > As she and I read together,
          > > > > >
          > > > > > my snowy street scape is her outside.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Her old chair is the envy of my concrete beaten, slush
          sodden
          > > feet.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > That's it, turn the page, madam, if you please
          > > > > >
          > > > > > and see if I encounter a pickpocket
          > > > > >
          > > > > > or a billy club twirling officer of the law.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > I sure am glad I wore my tweed cap
          > > > > >
          > > > > > so if you glance up
          > > > > >
          > > > > > you won't faint in shock
          > > > > >
          > > > > > from realizing you've switched centuries
          > > > > >
          > > > > > instantaneously.
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Rod
          > > > > > aka albi
          > > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jumpingstones/
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • queen_of_cryptic_cyphers
          Dearest Rod [aka Albi], I loved this poem and the creative content. I think it has so much potential. I know you don t prefer gobbs of concrete suggestions, so
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 1, 2008
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            Dearest Rod [aka Albi],

            I loved this poem and the creative content. I think it has so much
            potential. I know you don't prefer gobbs of concrete suggestions, so
            I will try to contrain myself.

            First, let me say that I think the entrance of your poem can be more
            striking if you move the onion up to the top so that the reader
            immediately is contrasting the images to its layers. Show how the
            images are layers of the onion. Don't ask the reader if they are.

            Second, let me say that I think your have nothing to lose by
            clarifying the subject of the poem early on. I feel the creative
            interaction with the cardboard cutout can stand on its own wonderful
            merit. That, in my opinion is enjoyable and surprize enoughI Try
            referring to her in some way like 'the cardboard woman reading in her
            holiday garb." Also break up the ghost manniquin into 2 separate
            lines and thoughts without a question. E.G.

            ...She is not a ghost,
            ...nor a mannequin.
            ...No! She breathes as her eyes sweep the lines
            ...and images like pages of a good book.

            Third, I think I would encase the 'That's it, turn the page...officer
            of the law." in italics or quotes. You might also consider making the
            last few lines third person [no quotes] and use [we've] instead of
            [you've]. I think that including yourself in these last few lines
            is 'showing' how much the mannequin has lured you into her reality as
            well as vice versa.

            As always; good luck.

            Hugs,
            Gwen




            --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, albiaicehouse <no_reply@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Reader in the Bookstore Window
            >
            >
            > Reflections through multiple glass panes.
            >
            > What is visible beyond the glass competes with what is behind me
            and
            >
            > what is off at an obtuse angle.
            >
            > Are these like layers to an onion?
            >
            > The stores on the other side of the street.
            >
            > The groups silhouetted in their trundling down the sidewalk.
            >
            > These are around me.
            >
            > But most disturbing
            > there is a woman reading in the deepest image.
            >
            > She is dressed in holiday Victorian garb.
            >
            > Is she a ghost mannequin?
            >
            > No! She breathes. Her eyes sweep the lines.
            >
            > Are these images like the pages of a book?
            >
            > Some are fading like the previous page's scene?
            >
            > Some are faint fore-shadows of scenes to be?
            >
            > As she and I read together,
            >
            > my snowy street scape is her outside.
            >
            > Her old chair is the envy of my concrete beaten, slush sodden feet.
            >
            > That's it, turn the page, madam, if you please
            >
            > and see if I encounter a pickpocket
            >
            > or a billy club twirling officer of the law.
            >
            > I sure am glad I wore my tweed cap
            >
            > so if you glance up
            >
            > you won't faint in shock
            >
            > from realizing you've switched centuries
            >
            > instantaneously.
            >
            >
            >
            > Rod
            > aka albi
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jumpingstones/
            >
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