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Re: [ticket2write] Spring Goddess

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  • GeorgeAnne
    Lovely poem, J.K. Very femine-ly Spring:) (I think I just made a new word? LOL) GeorgeAnne Spring Goddess She sits in the dappled light On a stone shelf by
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 31 7:00 PM
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      Lovely poem, J.K.  Very femine-ly Spring:)
      (I think I just made a new word? LOL)
       
      GeorgeAnne
       
       

      Spring Goddess


      She sits in the dappled light
      On a stone shelf by the tiny waterfall
      Amidst the ferns and flowers
      Her feet dangling in the small pool

      The sheer shift she wears
      Caressing her curves deliciously
      The opaque material hinting
      At treasures long hidden by winter

      Birds sing while insects buzz
      In the forest alive once again
      In a million shades of green
      Her pale skin is adorned with pink

      Rising, she lets the shift slide down
      Softly like silk on polished marble
      The knowing smile on her lush lips brightens
      As she wades deeper into the water

      Laying her head back into the waterfall
      Her hair joins the current momentarily
      Until rising, she retrieves the tresses
      In long, curling, dripping strands

      Cupping her hand she pours the fluid over her shoulder
      To trickle down her back in tiny rivulets
      While she hums an earthy tune
      Of water flowing from the mountains to the sea

      JK Saylor
      3-31-06




    • Gwen Ames
      Jerry, Welcome back to work. A nice romantic piece as always. There are some duplications which can easily find substitutes and there would be more immediacy
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 1, 2006
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        Jerry,
         
        Welcome back to work.
         
        A nice romantic piece as always. There are some duplications which can easily find substitutes and there would be more immediacy with a few verb tense changes I think. You might want to play with a simple present verb tense with a few continuous for variety and throw in some punctuation. Other than that a few suggestions below.
         
        Gwen
         
         
        Spring Goddess


        She sits in the dappled light                         ...show not tell
             /The light dapples over the woman/
        On a stone shelf by the tiny waterfall             ....'tiny' conflicts w/images in last stanza
        Amidst the ferns and flowers                         
        Her feet dangling in the small pool

        The sheer shift she wears                                 ...agree that 'shift' might be too dated
             /The sheer summer blouse is/
        Caressing her curves deliciously                       ...delicious curves
        The opaque material hinting

        At treasures long hidden by winter                      ...nice image

        Birds sing while insects buzz
        In the forest alive once again                              ...omit 'once'
        In a million shades of green
             /Wrapped by a million shades of green/          ...some verb would be nice
        Her pale skin is adorned with pink

        Rising, she lets the shift slide down      
             /Upon rising, the blouse slides down/
        Softly like silk on polished marble                    ...like polished silk (leave off marble)
        The knowing smile on her lush lips brightens
             /Her lush lips blush into a faint smile/
        As she wades deeper into the water

        Laying her head back into the waterfall              ...see not so 'tiny'
             /Tilting her head back under the rush/
        Her hair joins the current momentarily
             /Her hair flows as one with the current/
        Until rising, she retrieves the tresses                 ...used 'rising' in the last stanza also
            /Pausing some to retreive the tresses/
        In long, curling, dripping strands
             /of long, curling, dripping, strands/

        Cupping her hand she pours the fluid over her shoulder     /break into two lines/
             /Cupping water in her hand/
             /she pours the fluid over her shoulder/
        To trickle down her back in tiny rivulets
        While she hums an earthy tune
        Of water flowing from the mountains to the sea.               ...nice ending

        JK Saylor
        3-31-06


        Jerry <jerry5849@...> wrote:
        Spring Goddess


        She sits in the dappled light
        On a stone shelf by the tiny waterfall
        Amidst the ferns and flowers
        Her feet dangling in the small pool

        The sheer shift she wears
        Caressing her curves deliciously
        The opaque material hinting
        At treasures long hidden by winter

        Birds sing while insects buzz
        In the forest alive once again
        In a million shades of green
        Her pale skin is adorned with pink

        Rising, she lets the shift slide down
        Softly like silk on polished marble
        The knowing smile on her lush lips brightens
        As she wades deeper into the water

        Laying her head back into the waterfall
        Her hair joins the current momentarily
        Until rising, she retrieves the tresses
        In long, curling, dripping strands

        Cupping her hand she pours the fluid over her shoulder
        To trickle down her back in tiny rivulets
        While she hums an earthy tune
        Of water flowing from the mountains to the sea

        JK Saylor
        3-31-06





      • agoodchap
        ... Lol Shift too dated, Jerry has composed a poem in praise of a Spring Goddess not an ordinary woman. He isn t comparing a woman to a Goddess, he s
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 2, 2006
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          ---I have got to butt in here.

          Lol Shift too dated, Jerry has composed a poem in praise of a 'Spring
          Goddess' not an ordinary woman. He isn't comparing a woman to a
          Goddess, he's describing a Goddess. Caressing her 'curves
          deliciously' gives a more sensual aspect than 'delicious curves'
          while seemingly the same, doesn't give same sexual tension.

          'Rising, she lets the shift slide down' to 'Upon rising, the blouse
          slides down'. Takes the sentence from ancient romance to everyday
          language. Sometimes ultra correct English can kill a poem. Just a
          thought.

          Alison

          In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, Gwen Ames <poetry4u@...> wrote:
          >
          > Jerry,
          >
          > Welcome back to work.
          >
          > A nice romantic piece as always. There are some duplications
          which can easily find substitutes and there would be more immediacy
          with a few verb tense changes I think. You might want to play with a
          simple present verb tense with a few continuous for variety and throw
          in some punctuation. Other than that a few suggestions below.
          >
          > Gwen
          >
          >
          > Spring Goddess
          >
          >
          > She sits in the dappled light ...show not
          tell
          > /The light dapples over the woman/
          > On a stone shelf by the tiny waterfall ....'tiny'
          conflicts w/images in last stanza
          > Amidst the ferns and flowers
          > Her feet dangling in the small pool
          >
          > The sheer shift she wears ...agree
          that 'shift' might be too dated
          > /The sheer summer blouse is/
          > Caressing her curves
          deliciously ...delicious curves
          > The opaque material hinting
          > At treasures long hidden by winter ...nice
          image
          >
          > Birds sing while insects buzz
          > In the forest alive once
          again ...omit 'once'
          > In a million shades of green
          > /Wrapped by a million shades of green/ ...some verb
          would be nice
          > Her pale skin is adorned with pink
          >
          > Rising, she lets the shift slide down
          > /Upon rising, the blouse slides down/
          > Softly like silk on polished marble ...like
          polished silk (leave off marble)
          > The knowing smile on her lush lips brightens
          > /Her lush lips blush into a faint smile/
          > As she wades deeper into the water
          >
          > Laying her head back into the waterfall ...see not
          so 'tiny'
          > /Tilting her head back under the rush/
          > Her hair joins the current momentarily
          > /Her hair flows as one with the current/
          > Until rising, she retrieves the
          tresses ...used 'rising' in the last stanza also
          > /Pausing some to retreive the tresses/
          > In long, curling, dripping strands
          > /of long, curling, dripping, strands/
          >
          > Cupping her hand she pours the fluid over her shoulder /break
          into two lines/
          > /Cupping water in her hand/
          > /she pours the fluid over her shoulder/
          > To trickle down her back in tiny rivulets
          > While she hums an earthy tune
          > Of water flowing from the mountains to the
          sea. ...nice ending
          >
          > JK Saylor
          > 3-31-06
          >
          >
          > Jerry <jerry5849@...> wrote:
          > Spring Goddess
          >
          >
          > She sits in the dappled light
          > On a stone shelf by the tiny waterfall
          > Amidst the ferns and flowers
          > Her feet dangling in the small pool
          >
          > The sheer shift she wears
          > Caressing her curves deliciously
          > The opaque material hinting
          > At treasures long hidden by winter
          >
          > Birds sing while insects buzz
          > In the forest alive once again
          > In a million shades of green
          > Her pale skin is adorned with pink
          >
          > Rising, she lets the shift slide down
          > Softly like silk on polished marble
          > The knowing smile on her lush lips brightens
          > As she wades deeper into the water
          >
          > Laying her head back into the waterfall
          > Her hair joins the current momentarily
          > Until rising, she retrieves the tresses
          > In long, curling, dripping strands
          >
          > Cupping her hand she pours the fluid over her shoulder
          > To trickle down her back in tiny rivulets
          > While she hums an earthy tune
          > Of water flowing from the mountains to the sea
          >
          > JK Saylor
          > 3-31-06
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Learn more about ticket2wite at http://ticket2write.tripod.com
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
          >
          >
          > Visit your group "ticket2write" on the web.
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
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          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          >
        • Gwen Ames
          Alison, As always, our responses are opinions. The author is the only one with a corrective pen. I personally do not make a connection between shifts and
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 2, 2006
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            Alison,
             
            As always, our responses are opinions. The author is the only one with a corrective pen. I personally do not make a connection between 'shifts' and Goddesses ('tunic' or 'kaftan' maybe). As for the verb tense, you have a point and I understood what he was trying to do. However, some parts just seem awkward as:
             
                 The sheer shift she wears
                 carressing her curves deliciously
             
            I think it is the juxtaposition of the two verbs 'wears' and 'carressing' one right after the other. But in any case, those were my thoughts. Sometimes we are on target and helpful; sometimes not. And sometimes the critique process just helps reinforce that we knew what we wanted to write from the start.
             
            LOL,
            Gwen

            agoodchap <agoodchap@...> wrote:
            ---I have got to butt in here.

            Lol Shift too dated, Jerry has composed a poem in praise of a 'Spring
            Goddess' not an ordinary woman.  He isn't comparing a woman to a
            Goddess, he's describing a Goddess. Caressing her 'curves
            deliciously' gives a more sensual aspect than 'delicious curves'
            while seemingly the same, doesn't give same sexual tension.

            'Rising, she lets the shift slide down' to 'Upon rising, the blouse
            slides down'.  Takes the sentence from ancient romance to everyday
            language.  Sometimes ultra correct English can kill a poem.  Just a
            thought.

            Alison

            In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, Gwen Ames <poetry4u@...> wrote:
            >
            > Jerry,
            >   
            >   Welcome back to work.
            >   
            >   A nice romantic piece as always. There are some duplications
            which can easily find substitutes and there would be more immediacy
            with a few verb tense changes I think. You might want to play with a
            simple present verb tense with a few continuous for variety and throw
            in some punctuation. Other than that a few suggestions below.
            >   
            >   Gwen
            >   
            >   
            >   Spring Goddess
            >
            >
            > She sits in the dappled light                         ...show not
            tell
            >        /The light dapples over the woman/
            > On a stone shelf by the tiny waterfall             ....'tiny'
            conflicts w/images in last stanza
            >   Amidst the ferns and flowers                         
            >   Her feet dangling in the small pool
            >
            > The sheer shift she wears                                 ...agree
            that 'shift' might be too dated
            >        /The sheer summer blouse is/
            >   Caressing her curves
            deliciously                       ...delicious curves
            > The opaque material hinting
            > At treasures long hidden by winter                      ...nice
            image
            >
            > Birds sing while insects buzz
            > In the forest alive once
            again                              ...omit 'once'
            > In a million shades of green
            >        /Wrapped by a million shades of green/          ...some verb
            would be nice
            > Her pale skin is adorned with pink
            >
            > Rising, she lets the shift slide down      
            >        /Upon rising, the blouse slides down/
            > Softly like silk on polished marble                    ...like
            polished silk (leave off marble)
            > The knowing smile on her lush lips brightens
            >        /Her lush lips blush into a faint smile/
            > As she wades deeper into the water
            >
            > Laying her head back into the waterfall              ...see not
            so 'tiny'
            >        /Tilting her head back under the rush/
            > Her hair joins the current momentarily
            >        /Her hair flows as one with the current/
            > Until rising, she retrieves the
            tresses                 ...used 'rising' in the last stanza also
            >       /Pausing some to retreive the tresses/
            > In long, curling, dripping strands
            >        /of long, curling, dripping, strands/
            >
            > Cupping her hand she pours the fluid over her shoulder     /break
            into two lines/
            >        /Cupping water in her hand/
            >        /she pours the fluid over her shoulder/
            >   To trickle down her back in tiny rivulets
            >   While she hums an earthy tune
            > Of water flowing from the mountains to the
            sea.               ...nice ending
            >
            > JK Saylor
            > 3-31-06
            >
            >
            > Jerry <jerry5849@...> wrote:
            >   Spring Goddess
            >
            >
            > She sits in the dappled light
            > On a stone shelf by the tiny waterfall
            > Amidst the ferns and flowers
            > Her feet dangling in the small pool
            >
            > The sheer shift she wears
            > Caressing her curves deliciously
            > The opaque material hinting
            > At treasures long hidden by winter
            >
            > Birds sing while insects buzz
            > In the forest alive once again
            > In a million shades of green
            > Her pale skin is adorned with pink
            >
            > Rising, she lets the shift slide down
            > Softly like silk on polished marble
            > The knowing smile on her lush lips brightens
            > As she wades deeper into the water
            >
            > Laying her head back into the waterfall
            > Her hair joins the current momentarily
            > Until rising, she retrieves the tresses
            > In long, curling, dripping strands
            >
            > Cupping her hand she pours the fluid over her shoulder
            > To trickle down her back in tiny rivulets
            > While she hums an earthy tune
            > Of water flowing from the mountains to the sea
            >
            > JK Saylor
            > 3-31-06
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Learn more about ticket2wite at http://ticket2write.tripod.com
            >
            >
            >    
            > ---------------------------------
            >   YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            >
            >    
            >     Visit your group "ticket2write" on the web.
            >    
            >     To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            >  ticket2write-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >    
            >     Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            Service.
            >
            >    
            > ---------------------------------
            >







          • agoodchap
            ... perspective. I just didn t feel the language was awkward at all, but as you say, it s horses for courses. :-) Just to give you an idea of what Jerry
            Message 5 of 16 , Apr 3, 2006
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              --- I agree with much of what you say it is all a matter of
              perspective. I just didn't feel the language was awkward at all, but
              as you say, it's horses for courses. :-)

              Just to give you an idea of what Jerry conjured up for me. A shift
              gives me a picture of a sheer almost transparent garment next to the
              skin, low cut and as long as the imagination wants it. He empathised
              this by alliterating sheer next to shift, to make sure we got that
              picture. A tunic while being correct as an ancient garment, gives me
              the idea of thick cloth, short and awkward. A kaftan would show
              nothing of the womanly curves, and have nothing to do with an ancient
              and beautiful goddess.

              To me he was singing praise to spring in the shape of a goddess,
              using the sensual language of a lover. I wonder what Jerry intended?


              > Alison,
              >
              > As always, our responses are opinions. The author is the only one
              with a corrective pen. I personally do not make a connection
              between 'shifts' and Goddesses ('tunic' or 'kaftan' maybe). As for
              the verb tense, you have a point and I understood what he was trying
              to do. However, some parts just seem awkward as:
              >
              > The sheer shift she wears
              > carressing her curves deliciously
              >
              > I think it is the juxtaposition of the two verbs 'wears'
              and 'carressing' one right after the other. But in any case, those
              were my thoughts. Sometimes we are on target and helpful; sometimes
              not. And sometimes the critique process just helps reinforce that we
              knew what we wanted to write from the start.
              >
              > LOL,
              > Gwen
              >
              >
            • Jerry
              Hello dear friends, I would like to thank everyone for all of the input and suggestions made concerning my poem. As for my choice of the word `shift I was
              Message 6 of 16 , Apr 3, 2006
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                Hello dear friends,

                I would like to thank everyone for all of the input and suggestions
                made concerning my poem. As for my choice of the word `shift' I was
                trying to bring back from a previous age of the world the goddess of
                spring in her splendor, a time when there were no such clothing items
                as bras, thongs or blue jeans.

                Some of the other suggestions I received were well founded and I will
                seriously consider changing some parts of the poem, but I shall leave
                in the word `shift' for previously stated reasons.

                It is my hope that the poem was able to evoke certain dreamy visions
                of this grand season of the year. If I have accomplished that, then I
                will feel it was successful. Thanks again to everyone who responded.

                As always,
                Jerry
              • Carol
                Dear Jerry, Okay, you got me. I went up to the college library and browsed through the FOUR pages of definitions for the word shift. You were right, of
                Message 7 of 16 , Apr 4, 2006
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                  Dear Jerry,
                  Okay, you got me. I went up to the college library and browsed through
                  the FOUR pages of definitions for the word "shift." You were right, of
                  course. It's the perfect word to describe the delicate garment of the
                  goddess.
                  I'll share with you and the others what I learned.
                  From the Oxford English Dictionary
                  Shift n
                  10. A body garment of linen, cotton, or the like; in early use applied
                  indifferently to men's and women's underclothing; subsequently a
                  woman's `smock' or chemise. Now rare. In the 17th century, smock began
                  to be displaced by shift as a more delicate expression; in the 19th
                  century the latter has, from the same motive, given place to chemise
                  From the Webster's Unabridged International Dictionary
                  Shift n
                  a woman's slip or chemise
                  I could blame the confusion on my mother's generation. In the late
                  60's and early 70's, the fashion industry used the word "shift" as a
                  loose fitting woman's house dress. No goddess in her right mind would
                  be caught wearing something called a kaftan or worse, a mumu!!
                  Anyway, the images you conjured with your poem are lovely and
                  rejuvenating.
                  Always,
                  Carol

                  --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jerry5849@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello dear friends,
                  >
                  > I would like to thank everyone for all of the input and suggestions
                  > made concerning my poem. As for my choice of the word `shift' I was
                  > trying to bring back from a previous age of the world the goddess of
                  > spring in her splendor, a time when there were no such clothing items
                  > as bras, thongs or blue jeans.
                  >
                  > Some of the other suggestions I received were well founded and I will
                  > seriously consider changing some parts of the poem, but I shall leave
                  > in the word `shift' for previously stated reasons.
                  >
                  > It is my hope that the poem was able to evoke certain dreamy visions
                  > of this grand season of the year. If I have accomplished that, then I
                  > will feel it was successful. Thanks again to everyone who responded.
                  >
                  > As always,
                  > Jerry
                  >
                • wings081
                  Dear Carol and Jerry Now this has always been my understanding of a Shift : It is a diaphanous article of ladies attire which is/was used in the same way as a
                  Message 8 of 16 , Apr 5, 2006
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                    Dear Carol and Jerry

                    Now this has always been my understanding of a 'Shift':

                    It is a diaphanous article of ladies attire which is/was used in the
                    same way as a farmer would used barbed wire.
                    To protect the property from the invasion of uninvited visitors,
                    without obscuring the view of the landscape.

                    OH! bring back the good old days of shifts and shortie nighties.
                    Au naturel is OK if you are a little short of time and have a train
                    to catch, but on receiving a present there is so much fun in
                    unwrapping the parcel.

                    As always

                    Wings

                    --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Carol" <carol_emt87@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear Jerry,
                    > Okay, you got me. I went up to the college library and browsed
                    through
                    > the FOUR pages of definitions for the word "shift." You were
                    right, of
                    > course. It's the perfect word to describe the delicate garment of
                    the
                    > goddess.
                    > I'll share with you and the others what I learned.
                    > From the Oxford English Dictionary
                    > Shift n
                    > 10. A body garment of linen, cotton, or the like; in early use
                    applied
                    > indifferently to men's and women's underclothing; subsequently a
                    > woman's `smock' or chemise. Now rare. In the 17th century, smock
                    began
                    > to be displaced by shift as a more delicate expression; in the 19th
                    > century the latter has, from the same motive, given place to
                    chemise
                    > From the Webster's Unabridged International Dictionary
                    > Shift n
                    > a woman's slip or chemise
                    > I could blame the confusion on my mother's generation. In the late
                    > 60's and early 70's, the fashion industry used the word "shift" as
                    a
                    > loose fitting woman's house dress. No goddess in her right mind
                    would
                    > be caught wearing something called a kaftan or worse, a mumu!!
                    > Anyway, the images you conjured with your poem are lovely and
                    > rejuvenating.
                    > Always,
                    > Carol
                    >
                    > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jerry5849@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hello dear friends,
                    > >
                    > > I would like to thank everyone for all of the input and
                    suggestions
                    > > made concerning my poem. As for my choice of the word `shift' I
                    was
                    > > trying to bring back from a previous age of the world the
                    goddess of
                    > > spring in her splendor, a time when there were no such clothing
                    items
                    > > as bras, thongs or blue jeans.
                    > >
                    > > Some of the other suggestions I received were well founded and I
                    will
                    > > seriously consider changing some parts of the poem, but I shall
                    leave
                    > > in the word `shift' for previously stated reasons.
                    > >
                    > > It is my hope that the poem was able to evoke certain dreamy
                    visions
                    > > of this grand season of the year. If I have accomplished that,
                    then I
                    > > will feel it was successful. Thanks again to everyone who
                    responded.
                    > >
                    > > As always,
                    > > Jerry
                    > >
                    >
                  • Jerry
                    Dear Wings, I could not agree with you more. The delightful agony of anticipation is every bit as much fun as holding the unwrapped gift in your hands. Just
                    Message 9 of 16 , Apr 5, 2006
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                      Dear Wings,
                      I could not agree with you more. The delightful agony of
                      anticipation is every bit as much fun as holding the unwrapped gift
                      in your hands. Just beware...holding a goddess may have a higher
                      price than you can afford. Then again, we all must lay down this
                      mortal shell eventually, and what better reason than to please the
                      one you love. (smile)
                      As always,
                      Jerry


                      --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "wings081" <wings081@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Dear Carol and Jerry
                      >
                      > Now this has always been my understanding of a 'Shift':
                      >
                      > It is a diaphanous article of ladies attire which is/was used in
                      the
                      > same way as a farmer would used barbed wire.
                      > To protect the property from the invasion of uninvited visitors,
                      > without obscuring the view of the landscape.
                      >
                      > OH! bring back the good old days of shifts and shortie nighties.
                      > Au naturel is OK if you are a little short of time and have a
                      train
                      > to catch, but on receiving a present there is so much ﷯fun﷯ in
                      > unwrapping the parcel.
                      >
                      > As always
                      >
                      > Wings
                      >
                      > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Carol" <carol_emt87@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Dear Jerry,
                      > > Okay, you got me. I went up to the college library and browsed
                      > through
                      > > the FOUR pages of definitions for the word "shift." You were
                      > right, of
                      > > course. It's the perfect word to describe the delicate garment
                      of
                      > the
                      > > goddess.
                      > > I'll share with you and the others what I learned.
                      > > From the Oxford English Dictionary
                      > > Shift n
                      > > 10. A body garment of linen, cotton, or the like; in early use
                      > applied
                      > > indifferently to men's and women's underclothing; subsequently a
                      > > woman's `smock' or chemise. Now rare. In the 17th century, smock
                      > began
                      > > to be displaced by shift as a more delicate expression; in the
                      19th
                      > > century the latter has, from the same motive, given place to
                      > chemise
                      > > From the Webster's Unabridged International Dictionary
                      > > Shift n
                      > > a woman's slip or chemise
                      > > I could blame the confusion on my mother's generation. In the
                      late
                      > > 60's and early 70's, the fashion industry used the word "shift"
                      as
                      > a
                      > > loose fitting woman's house dress. No goddess in her right mind
                      > would
                      > > be caught wearing something called a kaftan or worse, a mumu!!
                      > > Anyway, the images you conjured with your poem are lovely and
                      > > rejuvenating.
                      > > Always,
                      > > Carol
                      > >
                      > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jerry5849@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Hello dear friends,
                      > > >
                      > > > I would like to thank everyone for all of the input and
                      > suggestions
                      > > > made concerning my poem. As for my choice of the word `shift'
                      I
                      > was
                      > > > trying to bring back from a previous age of the world the
                      > goddess of
                      > > > spring in her splendor, a time when there were no such
                      clothing
                      > items
                      > > > as bras, thongs or blue jeans.
                      > > >
                      > > > Some of the other suggestions I received were well founded and
                      I
                      > will
                      > > > seriously consider changing some parts of the poem, but I
                      shall
                      > leave
                      > > > in the word `shift' for previously stated reasons.
                      > > >
                      > > > It is my hope that the poem was able to evoke certain dreamy
                      > visions
                      > > > of this grand season of the year. If I have accomplished
                      that,
                      > then I
                      > > > will feel it was successful. Thanks again to everyone ﷯who﷯
                      > responded.
                      > > >
                      > > > As always,
                      > > > Jerry
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Susan Donahue
                      Dear Carol...This is one of the things I love about t2w. It is probably the only place in cyberspace where a discussion of women s undergarments can be done
                      Message 10 of 16 , Apr 6, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Dear Carol...This is one of the things I love about t2w. It is
                        probably the only place in cyberspace where a discussion of women's
                        undergarments can be done with such seriousness. It's quite
                        refreshing!

                        Suzianne


                        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Carol" <carol_emt87@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Dear Jerry,
                        > Okay, you got me. I went up to the college library and browsed
                        through
                        > the FOUR pages of definitions for the word "shift." You were
                        right, of
                        > course. It's the perfect word to describe the delicate garment of
                        the
                        > goddess.
                        > I'll share with you and the others what I learned.
                        > From the Oxford English Dictionary
                        > Shift n
                        > 10. A body garment of linen, cotton, or the like; in early use
                        applied
                        > indifferently to men's and women's underclothing; subsequently a
                        > woman's `smock' or chemise. Now rare. In the 17th century, smock
                        began
                        > to be displaced by shift as a more delicate expression; in the 19th
                        > century the latter has, from the same motive, given place to
                        chemise
                        > From the Webster's Unabridged International Dictionary
                        > Shift n
                        > a woman's slip or chemise
                        > I could blame the confusion on my mother's generation. In the late
                        > 60's and early 70's, the fashion industry used the word "shift" as
                        a
                        > loose fitting woman's house dress. No goddess in her right mind
                        would
                        > be caught wearing something called a kaftan or worse, a mumu!!
                        > Anyway, the images you conjured with your poem are lovely and
                        > rejuvenating.
                        > Always,
                        > Carol
                        >
                        > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jerry5849@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Hello dear friends,
                        > >
                        > > I would like to thank everyone for all of the input and
                        suggestions
                        > > made concerning my poem. As for my choice of the word `shift' I
                        was
                        > > trying to bring back from a previous age of the world the
                        goddess of
                        > > spring in her splendor, a time when there were no such clothing
                        items
                        > > as bras, thongs or blue jeans.
                        > >
                        > > Some of the other suggestions I received were well founded and I
                        will
                        > > seriously consider changing some parts of the poem, but I shall
                        leave
                        > > in the word `shift' for previously stated reasons.
                        > >
                        > > It is my hope that the poem was able to evoke certain dreamy
                        visions
                        > > of this grand season of the year. If I have accomplished that,
                        then I
                        > > will feel it was successful. Thanks again to everyone who
                        responded.
                        > >
                        > > As always,
                        > > Jerry
                        > >
                        >
                      • Susan Donahue
                        Dear Carol...This is one of the things I love about t2w. It is probably the only place in cyberspace where a discussion of women s undergarments can be done
                        Message 11 of 16 , Apr 6, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Dear Carol...This is one of the things I love about t2w. It is
                          probably the only place in cyberspace where a discussion of women's
                          undergarments can be done with such seriousness. It's quite
                          refreshing!

                          Suzianne


                          --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Carol" <carol_emt87@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Dear Jerry,
                          > Okay, you got me. I went up to the college library and browsed
                          through
                          > the FOUR pages of definitions for the word "shift." You were
                          right, of
                          > course. It's the perfect word to describe the delicate garment of
                          the
                          > goddess.
                          > I'll share with you and the others what I learned.
                          > From the Oxford English Dictionary
                          > Shift n
                          > 10. A body garment of linen, cotton, or the like; in early use
                          applied
                          > indifferently to men's and women's underclothing; subsequently a
                          > woman's `smock' or chemise. Now rare. In the 17th century, smock
                          began
                          > to be displaced by shift as a more delicate expression; in the 19th
                          > century the latter has, from the same motive, given place to
                          chemise
                          > From the Webster's Unabridged International Dictionary
                          > Shift n
                          > a woman's slip or chemise
                          > I could blame the confusion on my mother's generation. In the late
                          > 60's and early 70's, the fashion industry used the word "shift" as
                          a
                          > loose fitting woman's house dress. No goddess in her right mind
                          would
                          > be caught wearing something called a kaftan or worse, a mumu!!
                          > Anyway, the images you conjured with your poem are lovely and
                          > rejuvenating.
                          > Always,
                          > Carol
                          >
                          > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jerry5849@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hello dear friends,
                          > >
                          > > I would like to thank everyone for all of the input and
                          suggestions
                          > > made concerning my poem. As for my choice of the word `shift' I
                          was
                          > > trying to bring back from a previous age of the world the
                          goddess of
                          > > spring in her splendor, a time when there were no such clothing
                          items
                          > > as bras, thongs or blue jeans.
                          > >
                          > > Some of the other suggestions I received were well founded and I
                          will
                          > > seriously consider changing some parts of the poem, but I shall
                          leave
                          > > in the word `shift' for previously stated reasons.
                          > >
                          > > It is my hope that the poem was able to evoke certain dreamy
                          visions
                          > > of this grand season of the year. If I have accomplished that,
                          then I
                          > > will feel it was successful. Thanks again to everyone who
                          responded.
                          > >
                          > > As always,
                          > > Jerry
                          > >
                          >
                        • Manfred
                          That s easy for you to say Suzianne. I ll bet Carol didn t get ANY funny looks while researching Shift ... When I researched Moonbeams I got the wierdest
                          Message 12 of 16 , Apr 6, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            That's easy for you to say Suzianne. I'll bet Carol didn't get ANY
                            funny looks while researching 'Shift' ... When I 'researched'
                            "Moonbeams" I got the wierdest looks standing in the Women's Hygine
                            section of the supermarket ... I know one old biddy wanted to flail me
                            with her brolly!

                            <sighs>

                            Manfred.



                            --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue" <suzianne411@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > Dear Carol...This is one of the things I love about t2w. It is
                            > probably the only place in cyberspace where a discussion of women's
                            > undergarments can be done with such seriousness. It's quite
                            > refreshing!
                            >
                            > Suzianne
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Carol" <carol_emt87@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Dear Jerry,
                            > > Okay, you got me. I went up to the college library and browsed
                            > through
                            > > the FOUR pages of definitions for the word "shift." You were
                            > right, of
                            > > course. It's the perfect word to describe the delicate garment of
                            > the
                            > > goddess.
                            > > I'll share with you and the others what I learned.
                            > > From the Oxford English Dictionary
                            > > Shift n
                            > > 10. A body garment of linen, cotton, or the like; in early use
                            > applied
                            > > indifferently to men's and women's underclothing; subsequently a
                            > > woman's `smock' or chemise. Now rare. In the 17th century, smock
                            > began
                            > > to be displaced by shift as a more delicate expression; in the 19th
                            > > century the latter has, from the same motive, given place to
                            > chemise
                            > > From the Webster's Unabridged International Dictionary
                            > > Shift n
                            > > a woman's slip or chemise
                            > > I could blame the confusion on my mother's generation. In the late
                            > > 60's and early 70's, the fashion industry used the word "shift" as
                            > a
                            > > loose fitting woman's house dress. No goddess in her right mind
                            > would
                            > > be caught wearing something called a kaftan or worse, a mumu!!
                            > > Anyway, the images you conjured with your poem are lovely and
                            > > rejuvenating.
                            > > Always,
                            > > Carol
                            > >
                            > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jerry5849@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Hello dear friends,
                            > > >
                            > > > I would like to thank everyone for all of the input and
                            > suggestions
                            > > > made concerning my poem. As for my choice of the word `shift' I
                            > was
                            > > > trying to bring back from a previous age of the world the
                            > goddess of
                            > > > spring in her splendor, a time when there were no such clothing
                            > items
                            > > > as bras, thongs or blue jeans.
                            > > >
                            > > > Some of the other suggestions I received were well founded and I
                            > will
                            > > > seriously consider changing some parts of the poem, but I shall
                            > leave
                            > > > in the word `shift' for previously stated reasons.
                            > > >
                            > > > It is my hope that the poem was able to evoke certain dreamy
                            > visions
                            > > > of this grand season of the year. If I have accomplished that,
                            > then I
                            > > > will feel it was successful. Thanks again to everyone who
                            > responded.
                            > > >
                            > > > As always,
                            > > > Jerry
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • wings081
                            Dear Suzi Manfred in 27424 relates having a hard time researching Moonbeams . I would willingly have undertaken the task, because I have a propensity for
                            Message 13 of 16 , Apr 6, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Dear Suzi

                              Manfred in 27424 relates having a hard time researching "Moonbeams".
                              I would willingly have undertaken the task, because I have a
                              propensity for winding up the ladies clocks and waiting for the
                              alarm bells to ring.
                              I must tell you this tale about a sourpuss of a doctor's receptionist
                              who thought she'd take a male down a peg.
                              She asked the man's name and when he replied she said in a loud
                              voice for all in the waiting room to hear:
                              "Oh yes, you're the man who wants to see the doctor about your
                              impotence"
                              Now many men would wish the floor to open up and swallow them.
                              Not this gentleman. He snapped back, quick as a flash:
                              No, actually I want to ask about a sex change, but I don't want the
                              same surgeon you had.

                              If I was dishing out medals, he would be first in the queue.

                              As Ever

                              Wings






                              --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Donahue"
                              <suzianne411@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Dear Carol...This is one of the things I love about t2w. It is
                              > probably the only place in cyberspace where a discussion of
                              women's
                              > undergarments can be done with such seriousness. It's quite
                              > refreshing!
                              >
                              > Suzianne
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Carol" <carol_emt87@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Dear Jerry,
                              > > Okay, you got me. I went up to the college library and browsed
                              > through
                              > > the FOUR pages of definitions for the word "shift." You were
                              > right, of
                              > > course. It's the perfect word to describe the delicate garment
                              of
                              > the
                              > > goddess.
                              > > I'll share with you and the others what I learned.
                              > > From the Oxford English Dictionary
                              > > Shift n
                              > > 10. A body garment of linen, cotton, or the like; in early use
                              > applied
                              > > indifferently to men's and women's underclothing; subsequently a
                              > > woman's `smock' or chemise. Now rare. In the 17th century, smock
                              > began
                              > > to be displaced by shift as a more delicate expression; in the
                              19th
                              > > century the latter has, from the same motive, given place to
                              > chemise
                              > > From the Webster's Unabridged International Dictionary
                              > > Shift n
                              > > a woman's slip or chemise
                              > > I could blame the confusion on my mother's generation. In the
                              late
                              > > 60's and early 70's, the fashion industry used the word "shift"
                              as
                              > a
                              > > loose fitting woman's house dress. No goddess in her right mind
                              > would
                              > > be caught wearing something called a kaftan or worse, a mumu!!
                              > > Anyway, the images you conjured with your poem are lovely and
                              > > rejuvenating.
                              > > Always,
                              > > Carol
                              > >
                              > > --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jerry5849@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Hello dear friends,
                              > > >
                              > > > I would like to thank everyone for all of the input and
                              > suggestions
                              > > > made concerning my poem. As for my choice of the word `shift'
                              I
                              > was
                              > > > trying to bring back from a previous age of the world the
                              > goddess of
                              > > > spring in her splendor, a time when there were no such
                              clothing
                              > items
                              > > > as bras, thongs or blue jeans.
                              > > >
                              > > > Some of the other suggestions I received were well founded and
                              I
                              > will
                              > > > seriously consider changing some parts of the poem, but I
                              shall
                              > leave
                              > > > in the word `shift' for previously stated reasons.
                              > > >
                              > > > It is my hope that the poem was able to evoke certain dreamy
                              > visions
                              > > > of this grand season of the year. If I have accomplished
                              that,
                              > then I
                              > > > will feel it was successful. Thanks again to everyone who
                              > responded.
                              > > >
                              > > > As always,
                              > > > Jerry
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
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