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Re: [ticket2write] Advice requested

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  • tlsanders66@aol.com
    In a message dated 2/1/2004 12:24:14 AM Central Standard Time, phoenix743@yahoo.com writes: Should I look for an agent? Should I start contacting publishers?
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 31, 2004
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      In a message dated 2/1/2004 12:24:14 AM Central Standard Time, phoenix743@... writes:
      Should I look for an agent?
      Should I start contacting publishers?
      Do I want to write the entire book before I try to
      sell it?
       
      Buy Michael Larsen's book "How to Write A Book Proposal."
       
      I found it infinitely helpful when writing my first non-fiction proposal--it was the only resource I used--and I've recommended it to several new writers since who have also found it very helpful.
       
      And good luck!
       
      Tiffany
    • Jon Wood
      ... and check out or inter-library loan the book: HOW TO WRITE A BOOK PROPOSAL by Mike Larsen.Mike says that non-fiction books are sold mostly via a book
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 31, 2004
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        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, Audrey <phoenix743@y...> wrote:
        Should I look for an agent?
        Should I start contacting publishers?
        Do I want to write the entire book before I try to
        sell it?

        Thank you very much.

        Audrey

        =====
        Audrey, before going any further, I'd suggest you go to your local library,=
        and check out or inter-library loan the book: "HOW TO
        WRITE A BOOK PROPOSAL" by Mike Larsen.

        Mike says that non-fiction books are sold mostly via a book proposal. Once=
        you read the book, pick up a current copy of the
        WRITER'S MARKETSÂ…most libraries have a copy you can use either in the libra=
        ry like a reference book, or perhaps allow you to
        check it out for a week or two.

        Find houses that publish books like this one is going to be. Make a list o=
        f them: Editors name, their snail mail address, their email
        address, and first request their writer's guidelines. You may also want to=
        browse thru writer's agents. You can find them thru a
        search on the Internet, or, often can find a book of them in your library. =
        Keep in mind that even Writer's Markets book is one year
        behind the times as Editors often leave after the book is published, so bef=
        ore sending a query, try to discover for sure the persons
        name who your query will go to.

        I'd first query to see if the agent or editor is interested in such a book =
        idea as what you have. If they're not interested, there's no use
        to put the book proposal together. At least, not to the person you picked =
        out. Keep sending queries until you find an agent or a
        publisher that is interested in seeing such a book proposal as you named in=
        your query. Once you have that go ahead, THEN put
        your book proposal together, and submit it. It never hurts to double check=
        with the editor or agent before sending out that proposal in
        case their address has changed, or the editor has changed. In which case y=
        ou'll want to get the new editors name, and clip a copy of
        the go ahead from the previous editor along with the book proposal you subm=
        it.

        I'd never write the complete book without an agent or an editor who indicat=
        ed an interest in your book proposal query. Once you read
        that book, you will understand why not to. Of course, there are exceptions=
        to all rules.

        Like you said, fiction books are different. And Mike explains about that, =
        too, in his book.

        There's more to a book proposal than just what your book's about.

        Jon Wood-Author
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