Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

A Tip to Make You Better at the Business of Writing

Expand Messages
  • geffy1
    Build a portfolio before you start hitting the major newspapers/magazines/publishers. Mind you, I m not even remotely suggesting that you work for free. I m
    Message 1 of 2 , May 5, 2003
      Build a portfolio before you start hitting the major
      newspapers/magazines/publishers. Mind you, I'm not even
      remotely suggesting that you work for free. I'm really not. In fact, I
      insist on writers ALWAYS getting paid at least something for their
      hard work. What I am saying is this: You can't expect to be
      published in the New York Times or sell a book for a $400,000
      advance or get a major assignment from Sports Illustrated or
      People Magazine with little or no experience. You must pay your
      dues, like any other profession. You won't go from singing in the
      shower to headlining in Vegas. That's not realistic and you'll be
      hitting your head against a brick wall if you try. Instead, moving
      up the publishing ladder a step at a time, for more and more
      money, you should get at least 5-8 clips together, sizeable ones
      that show off your writing ability, before considering the "big
      boys." Begin with local papers or small magazines or trade
      publications. Make your "bones" there, where the competition
      isn't too stiff and where you'll have the freedom—and
      opportunities—to develop your own voice. And consider each
      story you write an audition for something better and higher
      paying. In other words, write the heck out of it. Make it brilliant!

      Best,

      Mike Geffner
      http://www.Keen.com/Writermike
    • Susan Donahue
      Dear Mike: It s great to hear from you again. Thank you for this excellent advice. For some reason, a lot of writers forget that writing is a business and
      Message 2 of 2 , May 6, 2003
        Dear Mike: It's great to hear from you again. Thank you for this
        excellent advice. For some reason, a lot of writers forget that
        writing is a business and that the ususal business practices
        employed by any entrepenuer should be applied. That includes
        marketing, self-promotion, a little record keeping for tax
        purposes, and making it clear to friends and family that you are
        not at their disposal when you are writing. When I was teaching
        writing, I would hear tales of how spouses and children would
        sabbotage writing efforts with demands for making snack,
        driving children to activities, etc. My students who worked for
        wages in offices would not have thought of dropping everything
        to do little domestic chores during working hours, but the ones
        who wrote at home had a difficult time establishing boundries.
        Writing is a career, even if we can do it at home at odd hours.

        Thanks again for the words of wisdom,

        Suzianne
        suzianne411@...
        http://suzianne.tripod.com

        --- In ticket2write@yahoogroups.com, "geffy1" <mgeffner@e...>
        wrote:
        > Build a portfolio before you start hitting the major
        > newspapers/magazines/publishers. Mind you, I'm not even
        > remotely suggesting that you work for free. I'm really not. In fact,
        I
        > insist on writers ALWAYS getting paid at least something for
        their
        > hard work. What I am saying is this: You can't expect to be
        > published in the New York Times or sell a book for a $400,000
        > advance or get a major assignment from Sports Illustrated or
        > People Magazine with little or no experience. You must pay
        your
        > dues, like any other profession. You won't go from singing in
        the
        > shower to headlining in Vegas. That's not realistic and you'll be
        > hitting your head against a brick wall if you try. Instead, moving
        > up the publishing ladder a step at a time, for more and more
        > money, you should get at least 5-8 clips together, sizeable
        ones
        > that show off your writing ability, before considering the "big
        > boys." Begin with local papers or small magazines or trade
        > publications. Make your "bones" there, where the competition
        > isn't too stiff and where you'll have the freedom—and
        > opportunities—to develop your own voice. And consider each
        > story you write an audition for something better and higher
        > paying. In other words, write the heck out of it. Make it brilliant!
        >
        > Best,
        >
        > Mike Geffner
        > http://www.Keen.com/Writermike
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.