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RE: Rigpa Glimpse of the Day

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  • Namdrol Tsepal
    Question: What should you say to a loved one who is talking about a third person with hatred or anger? On the one hand, you want to show compassion for the
    Message 1 of 785 , Jul 14, 2007
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      Question: What should you say to a loved one who is talking about a third
      person with hatred or anger? On the one hand, you want to show compassion
      for the feelings being experienced by the loved one. On the other hand, you
      don't want to reinforce or lend approval to that hatred. What might one say?

      Dalai Lama: Here I would like to tell a story. Once there was a Kadampa
      master called Gampowa who had many responsibilities. One day he complained
      to the Kadampa master Dromtonpa that he had hardly any time for his
      meditation or for his Dharma practice. So Dromtonpa responded by agreeing
      with him, "Yes, that's right. I don't have any time either." Then once an
      immediate affinity was established, Dromtonpa skillfully said, "But, you
      know what I am doing is for the service of the Dharma. Therefore, I feel
      satisfied." Similarly, if you find one of your beloved ones speaking against
      someone out of anger or hatred, maybe your initial reaction should be one of
      agreement and sympathy. Then once you have gained the person's confidence,
      you can say, "But...."

      --from "Healing Anger: The Power of Patience from a Buddhist Perspective" by
      the Dalai Lama, translated by Geshe Thupten Jinpa, published by Snow Lion
      Publications



      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      There are those who look on death with a naive, thoughtless cheerfulness,
      thinking that for some unknown reason death will work out all right for
      them, and that it is nothing to worry about. When I think of them, I am
      reminded of what one Tibetan master says: �People often make the mistake of
      being frivolous about death and think, �Oh well, death happens to everybody.
      It�s not a big deal, it�s natural. I�ll be fine.�� That�s a nice theory
      until one is dying.

      Sogyal Rinpoche

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      From a Buddhist point of view, the actual experience of death is very
      important. Although how or where we will be reborn is generally dependent on
      karmic forces, our state of mind at the time of death can influence the
      quality of our next rebirth. So at the moment of death, in spite of the
      great variety of karmas we have accumulated, if we make a special effort to
      generate a virtuous state of mind, we may strengthen and activate a virtuous
      karma, and so bring about a happy rebirth.


      THE DALAI LAMA



      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Even within the human realm, all of us have our own individual karma. Human
      beings look much the same, but we perceive things utterly differently, and
      we each live in our own unique, separate, individual world. As Kalu Rinpoche
      says:

      �If a hundred people sleep and dream, each of them will experience a
      different world in his dream. Everyone�s dream might be said to be true, but
      it would be meaningless to ascertain that only one person�s dream was the
      true world and all others were fallacies. There is truth for each perceiver
      according to the karmic patterns conditioning his perceptions.�


      Sogyal Rinpoche


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Rest in natural great peace
      This exhausted mind
      Beaten helpless by karma and neurotic thought,
      Like the relentless fury of the pounding waves
      In the infinite ocean of samsara.
      Rest in natural great peace.

      NYOSHUL KHEN RINPOCHE




      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      To contemplate impermanence on its own is not enough: You have to work with
      it in your life. Let�s try an experiment. Pick up a coin. Imagine that it
      represents the object at which you are grasping. Hold it tightly clutched in
      your fist and extend your arm, with the palm of your hand facing the ground.
      Now if you let go or relax your grip, you will lose what you are clinging
      to. That�s why you hold on.

      But there�s another possibility: You can let go and yet keep hold of it.
      With your arm still outstretched, turn your hand over so that it faces the
      sky. Release your hand and the coin still rests on your open palm. You let
      go. And the coin is still yours, even with all this space around it.

      So there is a way in which we can accept impermanence and still relish life,
      at one and the same time, without grasping.

      Sogyal Rinpoche


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Above all else, we need to nourish our true self�what we can call our buddha
      nature�for so often we make the fatal mistake of identifying with our
      confusion, and then using it to judge and condemn ourselves, which feeds the
      lack of self-love that so many of us suffer from today.

      How vital it is to refrain from the temptation to judge ourselves or the
      teachings, and to be humorously aware of our condition, and to realize that
      we are, at the moment, as if many people all living in one person.

      And how encouraging it can be to accept that from one perspective we all
      have huge problems, which we bring to the spiritual path and which indeed
      may have led us to the teachings, and yet to know from another point of view
      that ultimately our problems are not so real or so solid, or so
      insurmountable as we have told ourselves.


      Sogyal Rinpoche

      _________________________________________________________________
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    • Analine Tsepal
      If this elephant of mind is bound on all sides by the cord of mindfulness,All fear disappears and complete happiness comes.All enemies: all the tigers, lions,
      Message 785 of 785 , Aug 6 7:34 PM
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        If this elephant of mind is bound on all sides by the cord of mindfulness,
        All fear disappears and complete happiness comes.
        All enemies: all the tigers, lions, elephants, bears, serpents (of our emotions);
        And all the keepers of hell; the demons and the horrors,
        All of these are bound by the mastery of your mind,
        And by the taming of that one mind, all are subdued,
        Because from the mind are derived all fears and immeasurable sorrows.


        SHANTIDEVA

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