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HH Dalai Lama quote

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  • Federica Mastropaolo
    From: Snow Lion Publications Newletter Dalai Lama Quote of the Week The reason why we find so much discussion of epistemology, or how
    Message 1 of 785 , Jun 1, 2007
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      From: Snow Lion Publications Newletter <weblion@...>
       
      Dalai Lama Quote of the Week
       
      The reason why we find so much discussion of epistemology, or how to define something as a valid cognition, in Buddhist writings is because all our problems, suffering and confusion derive from a misconceived way of perceiving things. This explains why it is so important for a practitioner to determine whether a cognitive event is a misconception or true knowledge. For it is only by generating insight which sees through delusion that we can become liberated.
      Even in our own experience we can see how our state of mind passes through different stages, eventually leading to a state of true knowledge. For instance, our initial attitude or standpoint on any given topic might be a very hardened misconception, thinking and grasping at a totally mistaken notion. But when that strong grasping at the wrong notion is countered with reasoning, it can then turn into a kind of lingering doubt, an uncertainty where we wonder: "Maybe it is the case, but then again maybe it is not". That would represent a second stage. When further exposed to reason or evidence, this doubt of ours can turn into an assumption, tending towards the right decision. However, it is still just a presumption, just a belief. When that belief is yet further exposed to reason and reflection, eventually we could arrive at what is called 'inference generated through a reasoning process'. Yet that inference remains conceptual, and it is not a direct knowledge of the object. Finally, when we have developed this inference and constantly familiarized ourselves with it, it could turn into an intuitive and direct realization--a direct experience of the event. So we can see through our own experience how our mind, as a result of being exposed to reason and reflection, goes through different stages, eventually leading to a direct experience of a phenomenon or event.
       
      --from Dzogchen: The Heart Essence of the Great Perfection by the Dalai Lama, translated by Thupten Jinpa and Richard Barron, Foreword by Sogyal Rinpoche, edited by Patrick Gaffney, published by Snow Lion Publications



       


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    • Analine Tsepal
      If this elephant of mind is bound on all sides by the cord of mindfulness,All fear disappears and complete happiness comes.All enemies: all the tigers, lions,
      Message 785 of 785 , Aug 6, 2011
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        If this elephant of mind is bound on all sides by the cord of mindfulness,
        All fear disappears and complete happiness comes.
        All enemies: all the tigers, lions, elephants, bears, serpents (of our emotions);
        And all the keepers of hell; the demons and the horrors,
        All of these are bound by the mastery of your mind,
        And by the taming of that one mind, all are subdued,
        Because from the mind are derived all fears and immeasurable sorrows.


        SHANTIDEVA

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