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RE: Rigpa Glimpse of the Day

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  • Namdrol Tsepal
    It wouldn t be bad if you didn t have statues, but it has become indispensable to have Buddhist texts which deal with the structured path to train our mind. If
    Message 1 of 785 , Feb 13, 2007
      It wouldn't be bad if you didn't have statues, but it has become
      indispensable to have Buddhist texts which deal with the structured path to
      train our mind. If you have Buddhist texts, read them for yourselves and to
      friends who visit. That way you can help others to understand Buddhist
      ideas. For instance, it is interesting to read Milarepa's life story and
      songs. We find in them many enlightening lessons. Buddha's image alone will
      not purify us of karmic obscuration.... It is very important to study the
      scriptures. They are not to be just stacked up on the altar. They must be
      cultivated in our mind. ...[we] take great interest in having the symbolic
      representations of Buddha's body, speech and mind. I feel it is more
      important to acquire and read scriptures, the symbolic representations of
      his speech. You can pay homage to them, you can make offerings to them;
      above all, you should study them.

      --from "Generous Wisdom: Commentaries by H.H. the Dalai Lama XIV on the
      Jatakamala" translated by Tenzin Dorjee edited by Dexter Roberts



      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Is karma really so hard to see in operation? Don�t we only have to look back
      at our own lives to see clearly the consequences of some of our actions?
      When we upset or hurt someone, didn�t it rebound on us? Were we not left
      with a bitter and dark memory, and the shadows of self-disgust? That memory
      and those shadows are karma. Our habits and our fears too are also due to
      karma, the results of our past actions, words, and thoughts. If we examine
      our actions, and become really mindful of them, we will see that there is a
      pattern that repeats itself. Whenever we act negatively, it leads to pain
      and suffering; whenever we act positively, it eventually results in
      happiness.


      Sogyal Rinpoche

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Meditation is bringing the mind back home, and this is first achieved
      through the practice of mindfulness.

      Once an old woman came to Buddha and asked him how to meditate. He told her
      to remain aware of every movement of her hands as she drew water from the
      well, knowing that if she did, she would soon find herself in that state of
      alert and spacious calm that is meditation.



      Sogyal Rinpoche




      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Evoking the power of compassion in us is not always easy. I find myself that
      the simplest ways are the best and the most direct. Every day, life gives us
      innumerable chances to open our hearts, if we can only take them. An old
      woman passes you with a sad and lonely face and two heavy plastic bags full
      of shopping she can hardly carry. Switch on a television, and there on the
      news is a mother in Beirut kneeling above the body of her murdered son, or
      an old grandmother in Moscow pointing to the thin soup that is her only
      food. . . .

      Any one of these sights could open the eyes of your heart to the fact of
      vast suffering in the world. Let it. Don�t waste the love and grief it
      arouses. In the moment you feel compassion welling up in you, don�t brush it
      aside, don�t shrug it off and try quickly to return to �normal,� don�t be
      afraid of your feeling or be embarrassed by it, and don�t allow yourself to
      be distracted from it. Be vulnerable: Use that quick, bright uprush of
      compassion�focus on it, go deep into your heart and meditate on it, develop
      it, enhance and deepen it. By doing this you will realize how blind you have
      been to suffering.

      All beings, everywhere, suffer; let your heart go out to them all in
      spontaneous and immeasurable compassion.


      Sogyal Rinpoche


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Open people ask me: �How long should I meditate? And when? Should I practice
      twenty minutes in the morning and in the evening, or is it better to do
      several short practices during the day?� Yes, it is good to meditate for
      twenty minutes, though that is not to say that twenty minutes is the limit.
      I have not found in the scriptures any reference to twenty minutes; I think
      it is a notion that has been contrived in the West, and I call it Meditation
      Western Standard Time.

      The point is not how long you meditate; the point is whether the practice
      actually brings you to a certain state of mindfulness and presence, where
      you are a little open and able to connect with your heart essence. And five
      minutes of wakeful sitting practice is of far greater value than twenty
      minutes of dozing!


      Sogyal Rinpoche

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Because in our culture we overvalue the intellect, we imagine that to become
      enlightened demands extraordinary intelligence. In fact, many kinds of
      cleverness are just further obscurations. There is a Tibetan saying: �If you
      are too clever, you could miss the point entirely.�

      Patrul Rinpoche said: �The logical mind seems interesting, but it is the
      seed of delusion.� People can become obsessed with their own theories and
      miss the point of everything. In Tibet we say: �Theories are like patches on
      a coat, one day they just wear off.�


      Sogyal Rinpoche

      _________________________________________________________________
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    • Analine Tsepal
      If this elephant of mind is bound on all sides by the cord of mindfulness,All fear disappears and complete happiness comes.All enemies: all the tigers, lions,
      Message 785 of 785 , Aug 6, 2011

        If this elephant of mind is bound on all sides by the cord of mindfulness,
        All fear disappears and complete happiness comes.
        All enemies: all the tigers, lions, elephants, bears, serpents (of our emotions);
        And all the keepers of hell; the demons and the horrors,
        All of these are bound by the mastery of your mind,
        And by the taming of that one mind, all are subdued,
        Because from the mind are derived all fears and immeasurable sorrows.


        SHANTIDEVA

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