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RE: Rigpa Glimpse of the Day

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  • Namdrol Tsepal
    Question: What is the relationship of the mind and afflictive emotions? DL: The very entity of the mind, its nature of mere luminosity and knowing, is not
    Message 1 of 785 , Aug 11, 2006
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      Question: What is the relationship of the mind and afflictive emotions?

      DL: The very entity of the mind, its nature of mere luminosity and knowing,
      is not polluted by defilements; they do not abide in the entity of the
      mind. Even when we generate afflictive emotions, the very entity or nature
      of the mind is still mere luminosity and knowing, and because of this we
      are able to remove the afflictive emotions. If you agitate the water in a
      pond, it becomes cloudy with mud; yet the very nature of the water itself
      is not dirty. When you allow it to become still again, the mud will settle,
      leaving the water pure. How are defilements removed? They are not removed
      by outside action, nor by leaving them as they are; they are removed by the
      power of antidotes, meditative antidotes.

      --from "The Dalai Lama, A Policy of Kindness: An Anthology of Writings By
      and About the Dalai Lama" compiled and edited by Sidney Piburn, published
      by Snow Lion Publications




      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


      There would be no chance at all of getting to know death if it happened only
      once. But fortunately, life is nothing but a continuing dance of birth and
      death, a dance of change. Every time I hear the rush of a mountain stream,
      or the waves crashing on the shore, or my own heartbeat, I hear the sound of
      impermanence. These changes, these small deaths, are our living links with
      death. They are death�s pulses, death�s heartbeat, prompting us to let go of
      all the things we cling to.



      Sogyal Rinpoche



      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Sit for a short time; then take a break, a very short break of about thirty
      seconds or a minute. But be mindful of whatever you do, and do not lose your
      presence and its natural ease. Then alert yourself and sit again. If you do
      many short sessions like this, your breaks will often make your meditation
      more real and more inspiring; they will take the clumsy, irksome rigidity,
      solemnity, and unnaturalness out of your practice and bring you more and
      more focus and ease.

      Gradually, through this interplay of breaks and sitting, the barrier between
      meditation and everyday life will crumble, the contrast between them will
      dissolve, and you will find yourself increasingly in your natural pure
      presence, without distraction.

      Then, as Dudjom Rinpoche used to say: �Even though the meditator may leave
      the meditation, the meditation will not leave the meditator.�


      Sogyal Rinpoche


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Because the law of karma is inevitable and infallible, whenever we harm
      others, we are directly harming ourselves, and whenever we bring them
      happiness, we are bringing ourselves future happiness. The Dalai Lama says:

      �If you try to subdue your selfish motives�anger and so forth�and develop
      more kindness and compassion for others, ultimately you yourself will
      benefit more than you would otherwise. So sometimes I say that the wise
      selfish person should practice this way. Foolish selfish people are always
      thinking of themselves, and the result is negative. Wise selfish people
      think of others, help others as much as they can, and the result is that
      they too receive benefit.�



      Sogyal Rinpoche
    • Analine Tsepal
      If this elephant of mind is bound on all sides by the cord of mindfulness,All fear disappears and complete happiness comes.All enemies: all the tigers, lions,
      Message 785 of 785 , Aug 6, 2011
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        If this elephant of mind is bound on all sides by the cord of mindfulness,
        All fear disappears and complete happiness comes.
        All enemies: all the tigers, lions, elephants, bears, serpents (of our emotions);
        And all the keepers of hell; the demons and the horrors,
        All of these are bound by the mastery of your mind,
        And by the taming of that one mind, all are subdued,
        Because from the mind are derived all fears and immeasurable sorrows.


        SHANTIDEVA

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