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Re: [TBG] RE: Rigpa Glimpse of the Day

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  • veronica maas
    I agree - I even told the predikant in my christian church that I am a budhist. But I talk a lot about christianity because that is the cultural heritage here
    Message 1 of 11 , May 29, 2006
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      I agree - I even told the predikant in my christian church that I am a budhist.

      But I talk a lot about christianity because that is the cultural heritage here - everybody knows the content of the bible - so this is the easiest way here to talk about religion - when you are just meeting people in the street or in church.

      Anyway, frankly I do not feel I know enough about budhism to talk a lot about it. You see I was raised here in the r.k. religion - I only came into contact with budhism in 1993 or so.

      In the life before this I was married to a moslim - and we lived among very poor people - somewhere in afrika.

      I am glad I am married to a poor african moslim again in this life - I must have liked the life before this. I would like to go back to africa - but my husband says I should stay here.

      I also do not know much about islam - as in islam religion is the job of the man - the only job of the woman is to raise the children and help and support her husband as best as she can.
      That is fine with me - I like it that way.

      So I only know quite a lot about the r.k. religion as I got a lot of sacraments in that church.

      I am very interested in budhism and islam. But you know a lot more about is than I do I am sure.

      All the best,

      Veronica

      Namdrol Tsepal <tenzin111@...> wrote:
      Tashi Deleg!

      Dear Veronica,

      I have no knowledage of what christian's believe. If you were to look at how
      both try to benefit others it does looks the same.

      The only thing I can tell the different between both are in Buddhism we
      respect no only the human right but also the animal as well. We should not
      to kill another beings just because we like the taste of their meat, I
      understand to some Christan's some animal are "made" to be human's food.

      As for your question on the psysical suffering the Budha endured when he
      meditated to end all suffering in the world for all beings.

      It do not sound strange to me at all first due to our past cause and
      condition which will not make it easy for us to practice on our path
      suffering maybe expected.

      If you do not understand why Buddha endured the suffering, the only thing I
      can tell you is that he love us more then himself, like a mother would
      endured any suffering for her child.


      Sarwa Mangalam
      May all be Auspicious!
      Namdrol Tsepal





      >From: veronica maas
      >Reply-To: tibetanbuddhistgroup@yahoogroups.com
      >To: tibetanbuddhistgroup@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: Re: [TBG] RE: Rigpa Glimpse of the Day
      >Date: Thu, 18 May 2006 05:40:16 -0700 (PDT)
      >
      >Am I stupid or does this sound like it comes directly from the r.k. church.
      >
      > With the Budha being God of course
      > Dharma being the true rules and cathegesis of christianity - what
      >christianity is all about.
      > Sangha would stand for the fact that you have to pay back all the
      >christians (budha's) that came and went before you to give you this
      >religion and all other material and spiritual things that you can use.
      > You have to pay for that with your blood and your body - like in the
      >christion communion. You have to work untill your back brakes and you are
      >so pale you feel you have no blood left in yourself.
      >
      > How strange it sounds like the psysical suffering the Budha endured when
      >he meditated to end all suffering in the world for all beings.
      >
      > Does anybody see the link - or is it just me?
      >
      >Namdrol Tsepal wrote:
      > Going for Refuge to the Three Jewels
      >
      >....a buddha is someone who has attained full enlightenment through the
      >cultivation of compassion and the wisdom of no-self, the absence of
      >self-existence. From our discussion we also saw how the Dharma jewel is to
      >be understood as the path by which we can gradually accomplish the same
      >result as the fully awakened Buddha. Likewise, the Sangha jewel is the
      >community of sincere practitioners who have directly realised emptiness,
      >the
      >ultimate nature of reality.
      >
      >
      >For those of us who consider ourselves to be practising Buddhists, it is
      >crucial to have this kind of deeper understanding of the Three Jewels when
      >we go for refuge to the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha.
      >
      >
      >-- by The Dalai Lama, from "Lighting the Way" published by Snow Lion
      >Publications
      >
      >
      >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      >
      >
      >If you are sitting, and your mind is not wholly in tune with your body—if
      >you are, for instance, anxious or preoccupied with something—your body will
      >experience physical discomfort, and difficulties will arise more easily.
      >Whereas if your mind is in a calm, inspired state, it will influence your
      >whole posture, and you can sit much more naturally and effortlessly. So it
      >is very important to unite the posture of your body and the confidence that
      >arises from your realization of the nature of your mind.
      >
      >
      >Sogyal Rinpoche
      >
      >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      >
      >What is the View? It is nothing less than seeing the actual state of things
      >as they are; it is knowing that the true nature of mind is the true nature
      >of everything; and it is realizing that the true nature of mind is the
      >absolute truth.
      >
      >Dudjom Rinpoche says: “The View is the comprehension of the naked
      >awareness,
      >within which everything is contained: sensory perception and phenomenal
      >existence, samsara and nirvana. This awareness has two aspects: ‘emptiness’
      >as the absolute, and ‘appearances’ or ‘perception’ as the relative.”
      >
      >
      >
      >Sogyal Rinpoche
      >
      >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      >More than twenty-five hundred years ago, a man who had been searching for
      >the truth for many, many lifetimes came to a quiet place in northern India
      >and sat down under a tree. He continued to sit under the tree, with immense
      >resolve, and vowed not to get up until he had found the truth.
      >
      >At dusk, it is said, he conquered all the dark forces of delusion; and
      >early
      >the next morning, as the planet Venus broke in the dawn sky, the man was
      >rewarded for his age-long patience, discipline, and flawless concentration
      >by achieving the final goal of human existence: enlightenment.
      >
      >At that sacred moment, the earth itself shuddered, as if “drunk with
      >bliss,”
      >and, as the scriptures tell us: “No one anywhere was angry, ill or sad; no
      >one did evil, none was proud; the world became quite quiet, as though it
      >had
      >reached full perfection.” This man became known as Buddha.
      >
      >
      >Sogyal Rinpoche
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >http://www.rigpaus.org/Glimpse/Glimpse.php - "Glimpses" by Sogyal Rinpoche
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      >http://www.rigpaus.org/Glimpse/Glimpse.php - "Glimpses" by Sogyal Rinpoche
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >





      http://www.rigpaus.org/Glimpse/Glimpse.php - "Glimpses" by Sogyal Rinpoche
      Yahoo! Groups Links










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    • Steven Levey
      This was so interesting. His Holiness says, regarding the forming of the material Universe: Buddhists would say there is a condition which makes it possible,
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 5, 2007
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        This was so interesting. His Holiness says, regarding the forming of the material Universe:
         
        "Buddhists would say there is a condition which makes it possible,
        and we speak of that condition as the awareness of sentient beings."
         
        To me this says that the "condition" for such forming, or manvantara in Sanskrit, is based in the thought of sentient beings. Therefore we all have something to do with its formation, beauty, preservation and destruction. When one looks at photos from the Hubble, there are wonderful vistas of Galaxies, Nebulae, Gas Clouds, Novas, etc. and a great deal of what we are looking at are really forms of dissolution in huge circumstances, but which are beheld in their awesome beauty. Also, a great deal of what we see has already happened, in some cases, thousands of years agao, as it takes these images ages to travel at the speed of light to our eye in the form of the Hubble telescope. In a way I think we are not only looking at the past, but at timelessness in which it all takes place.
         
        Steve


        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Namdrol Tsepal <tenzin111@...>
        To: dechen@onelist.com; Highest_Yoga_Tantra@yahoogroups.com; NamdrolTsepal@yahoogroups.com; ngchingee@...; sc23jul@...; thekchen-choling@yahoogroups.com; tibetanbuddhistgroup@yahoogroups.com; womens-sangha@yahoogroups.com; youth@...
        Sent: Friday, March 2, 2007 6:48:57 AM
        Subject: [TBG] RE: Rigpa Glimpse of the Day

        ..when we ask, what is the substantial cause of the material universe way
        back in the early history of the universe, we trace it back to the space
        particles which transform into the elements of this manifest universe. And
        then we can ask whether those space particles have an ultimate beginning.
        The answer is no. They are beginningless. Where other philosophical systems
        maintain that the original cause was God, Buddha suggested the alternative
        that there aren't any ultimate causes. The world is beginningless. Then the
        question would be: Why is it beginningless? And the answer is, it is just
        nature. There is no reason. Matter is just matter.

        Now we have a problem: What accounts for the evolution of the universe as we
        know it? What accounts for the loose particles in space forming into the
        universe that is apparent to us? Why did it go through orderly processes of
        change? Buddhists would say there is a condition which makes it possible,
        and we speak of that condition as the awareness of sentient beings.

        --from "Consciousness at the Crossroads: Conversations with the Dalai Lama
        on Brain Science and Buddhism" edited by Zara Houshmand, Robert B.
        Livingston, and B. Alan Wallace, published by Snow Lion Publications

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        You can think of the nature of mind like a mirror, with five different
        powers or “wisdoms.” Its openness and vastness is the “wisdom of
        all-encompassing space,” the womb of compassion. Its capacity to reflect in
        precise detail whatever comes before it is the “mirrorlike wisdom.” Its
        fundamental lack of any bias toward any impression is the “equalizing
        wisdom.” Its ability to distinguish clearly, without confusing in any way
        the various different phenomena that arise, is the “wisdom of discernment.”
        And its potential of having everything already accomplished, perfected, and
        spontaneously present is the “all-accomplishing wisdom.”



        Sogyal Rinpoche

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        For meditation to happen, calm and auspicious conditions have to be created.
        Before we have mastery over our minds, we need first to calm their
        environment.
        At the moment, our minds are like a candle flame: unstable, flickering,
        constantly changing, fanned by the violent winds of our thoughts and
        emotions. The flame will burn steadily only when we can calm the air around
        it; so we can only begin to glimpse and rest in the nature of mind when we
        have stilled the turbulence of our thoughts and emotions. On the other hand,
        once we have found a stability in our meditation, noises and disturbances of
        every kind will have far less impact.



        Sogyal Rinpoche




        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        The beginner’s mind is an open mind, an empty mind, a ready mind, and if we
        really listen with a beginner’s mind, we might really begin to hear. For if
        we listen with a silent mind, as free as possible from the clamor of
        preconceived ideas, a possibility will be created for the truth of the
        teachings to pierce us, and for the meaning of life and death to become
        increasingly and startlingly clear.

        My master Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche said: “The more and more you listen, the
        more and more you hear; the more and more you hear, the deeper and deeper
        your understanding becomes.”



        Sogyal Rinpoche


        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        Gradually, as you remain open and mindful, and use a technique to focus your
        mind more and more, your negativity will slowly be defused; you begin to
        feel well in your own skin, or, as the French say, être bien dans sa peau
        (“well in your own skin”). From this comes release and a profound ease. I
        think of this practice as the most effective form of therapy and
        self-healing.


        Sogyal Rinpoche

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        Every single negative thing we have ever thought or done has ultimately
        arisen from our grasping at a false self, and our cherishing of that false
        self, making it the dearest and most important element in our lives. All
        those negative thoughts, emotions, desires, and actions that are the cause
        of our negative karma are engendered by self-grasping and self-cherishing.
        They are the dark, powerful magnet that attracts to us, life after life,
        every obstacle, every misfortune, every anguish, every disaster, and so they
        are the root cause of all the sufferings of samsara.


        Sogyal Rinpoche

        _________________________________________________________________
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      • Nguyen Minh Thu Nhien
        Dear my friends, Tomorrow 18-JULY-2007 is a Duchen Day = 10Mil. times multiplication of either positive or negative activities. Best, Nhien ... From: Namdrol
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 16, 2007
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          Dear my friends,
           
          Tomorrow 18-JULY-2007 is a Duchen Day = 10Mil. times multiplication of either positive or negative activities.

           

          Best,

           

          Nhien


           
           


          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Namdrol Tsepal <tenzin111@...>
          To: dechen@onelist.com; Highest_Yoga_Tantra@yahoogroups.com; NamdrolTsepal@yahoogroups.com; ngchingee@...; sc23jul@...; thekchen-choling@yahoogroups.com; tibetanbuddhistgroup@yahoogroups.com; womens-sangha@yahoogroups.com; youth@...
          Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2007 2:07:18 PM
          Subject: [TBG] RE: Rigpa Glimpse of the Day

          Question: What should you say to a loved one who is talking about a third
          person with hatred or anger? On the one hand, you want to show compassion
          for the feelings being experienced by the loved one. On the other hand, you
          don't want to reinforce or lend approval to that hatred. What might one say?

          Dalai Lama: Here I would like to tell a story. Once there was a Kadampa
          master called Gampowa who had many responsibilities. One day he complained
          to the Kadampa master Dromtonpa that he had hardly any time for his
          meditation or for his Dharma practice. So Dromtonpa responded by agreeing
          with him, "Yes, that's right. I don't have any time either." Then once an
          immediate affinity was established, Dromtonpa skillfully said, "But, you
          know what I am doing is for the service of the Dharma. Therefore, I feel
          satisfied." Similarly, if you find one of your beloved ones speaking against
          someone out of anger or hatred, maybe your initial reaction should be one of
          agreement and sympathy. Then once you have gained the person's confidence,
          you can say, "But...."

          --from "Healing Anger: The Power of Patience from a Buddhist Perspective" by
          the Dalai Lama, translated by Geshe Thupten Jinpa, published by Snow Lion
          Publications



          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          There are those who look on death with a naive, thoughtless cheerfulness,
          thinking that for some unknown reason death will work out all right for
          them, and that it is nothing to worry about. When I think of them, I am
          reminded of what one Tibetan master says: “People often make the mistake of
          being frivolous about death and think, ‘Oh well, death happens to everybody.
          It’s not a big deal, it’s natural. I’ll be fine.’” That’s a nice theory
          until one is dying.

          Sogyal Rinpoche

          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          From a Buddhist point of view, the actual experience of death is very
          important. Although how or where we will be reborn is generally dependent on
          karmic forces, our state of mind at the time of death can influence the
          quality of our next rebirth. So at the moment of death, in spite of the
          great variety of karmas we have accumulated, if we make a special effort to
          generate a virtuous state of mind, we may strengthen and activate a virtuous
          karma, and so bring about a happy rebirth.


          THE DALAI LAMA



          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          Even within the human realm, all of us have our own individual karma. Human
          beings look much the same, but we perceive things utterly differently, and
          we each live in our own unique, separate, individual world. As Kalu Rinpoche
          says:

          “If a hundred people sleep and dream, each of them will experience a
          different world in his dream. Everyone’s dream might be said to be true, but
          it would be meaningless to ascertain that only one person’s dream was the
          true world and all others were fallacies. There is truth for each perceiver
          according to the karmic patterns conditioning his perceptions.”


          Sogyal Rinpoche


          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          Rest in natural great peace
          This exhausted mind
          Beaten helpless by karma and neurotic thought,
          Like the relentless fury of the pounding waves
          In the infinite ocean of samsara.
          Rest in natural great peace.

          NYOSHUL KHEN RINPOCHE




          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          To contemplate impermanence on its own is not enough: You have to work with
          it in your life. Let’s try an experiment. Pick up a coin. Imagine that it
          represents the object at which you are grasping. Hold it tightly clutched in
          your fist and extend your arm, with the palm of your hand facing the ground.
          Now if you let go or relax your grip, you will lose what you are clinging
          to. That’s why you hold on.

          But there’s another possibility: You can let go and yet keep hold of it.
          With your arm still outstretched, turn your hand over so that it faces the
          sky. Release your hand and the coin still rests on your open palm. You let
          go. And the coin is still yours, even with all this space around it.

          So there is a way in which we can accept impermanence and still relish life,
          at one and the same time, without grasping.

          Sogyal Rinpoche


          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          Above all else, we need to nourish our true self—what we can call our buddha
          nature—for so often we make the fatal mistake of identifying with our
          confusion, and then using it to judge and condemn ourselves, which feeds the
          lack of self-love that so many of us suffer from today.

          How vital it is to refrain from the temptation to judge ourselves or the
          teachings, and to be humorously aware of our condition, and to realize that
          we are, at the moment, as if many people all living in one person.

          And how encouraging it can be to accept that from one perspective we all
          have huge problems, which we bring to the spiritual path and which indeed
          may have led us to the teachings, and yet to know from another point of view
          that ultimately our problems are not so real or so solid, or so
          insurmountable as we have told ourselves.


          Sogyal Rinpoche

          _________________________________________________________________
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          http://www.rigpaus.org/Glimpse/Glimpse.php - "Glimpses" by Sogyal Rinpoche
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