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Re: Glimpse of the day, November 22nd

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  • kyabdro
    O love, O pure deep love, be here, be now Be all; worlds dissolve into your stainless endless radiance, Frail living leaves burn with you brighter than cold
    Message 1 of 15 , Nov 22, 2002
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      O love, O pure deep love, be here, be now
      Be all; worlds dissolve into your stainless endless radiance,
      Frail living leaves burn with you brighter than cold stars:
      Make me your servant, your breath, your core.

      RUMI

      -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

      Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
    • kyabdro
      We may say, and even half-believe, that compassion is marvelous, but in practice our actions are deeply uncompassionate and bring us and others mostly
      Message 2 of 15 , Nov 24, 2002
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        We may say, and even half-believe, that compassion is marvelous, but
        in practice our actions are deeply uncompassionate and bring us and
        others mostly frustration and distress, and not the happiness we are
        all seeking.

        Isn't it absurd that we all long for happiness, yet nearly all our
        actions and feelings lead us directly away from that happiness?

        What do we imagine will make us happy? A canny, self-seeking,
        resourceful selfishness, the selfish protection of ego, which can as
        we all know, make us at moments extremely brutal. But in fact the
        complete reverse is true: Self-grasping and self-cherishing are seen,
        when you really look at them, to be the root of all harm to others,
        and also of all harm to ourselves.

        -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

        Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
      • kyabdro
        Sometimes people think that when they meditate there should be no thoughts and emotions at all; and when thoughts and emotions do arise, they become annoyed
        Message 3 of 15 , Nov 25, 2002
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          Sometimes people think that when they meditate there should be no
          thoughts and emotions at all; and when thoughts and emotions do
          arise, they become annoyed and exasperated with themselves and think
          they have failed. Nothing could be further from the truth. There is a
          Tibetan saying: "It's a tall order to ask for meat without bones, and
          tea without leaves." As long as you have a mind, you will have
          thoughts and emotions.

          -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

          Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
        • kyabdro
          Confined in the dark, narrow cage of our own making that we take for the whole universe, very few of us can even begin to imagine another dimension of mind.
          Message 4 of 15 , Nov 26, 2002
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            Confined in the dark, narrow cage of our own making that we take for
            the whole universe, very few of us can even begin to imagine another
            dimension of mind. Patrul Rinpoche tells the story of an old frog who
            had lived all his life in a dank well. One day a frog from the sea
            paid him a visit.

            "Where do you come from?" asked the frog in the well.
            "From the great ocean," he replied.
            "How big is your ocean?"
            "It's gigantic."
            "You mean about a quarter of the size of my well here?"
            "Bigger."
            "Bigger? You mean half as big?"
            "No, even bigger."
            "Is it . . . as big as this well?"
            "There's no comparison." "That's impossible! I've got to see this for
            myself."

            They set off together. When the frog from the well saw the ocean, it
            was such a shock that his head just exploded into pieces.

            -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

            Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
          • kyabdro
            Whatever our lives are like, our buddha nature is always there. And it is always perfect. We say that not even the buddhas can improve it in their infinite
            Message 5 of 15 , Nov 27, 2002
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              Whatever our lives are like, our buddha nature is always there. And
              it is always perfect. We say that not even the buddhas can improve it
              in their infinite wisdom, nor can sentient beings spoil it in their
              seemingly infinite confusion.

              Our true nature could be compared to the sky, and the confusion of
              the ordinary mind to clouds. Some days the sky is completely obscured
              by clouds. When we are down on the ground, looking up, it is very
              difficult to believe that there is anything else there but clouds.
              Yet we have only to fly in a plane to discover above the clouds a
              limitless expanse of clear blue sky. From up there, the clouds we
              assumed were everything seem so small and so far away down below.

              We should always try to remember: The clouds are not the sky and do
              not "belong" to it. They only hang there and pass by in their
              slightly ridiculous and nondependent fashion. And they can never
              stain or mark the sky in any way.

              -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

              Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
            • kyabdro
              Action is being truly observant of your own thoughts, good or bad, looking into the true nature of whatever thoughts may arise, neither tracing the past nor
              Message 6 of 15 , Nov 28, 2002
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                'Action' is being truly observant of your own thoughts, good or bad,
                looking into the true nature of whatever thoughts may arise, neither
                tracing the past nor inviting the future, neither allowing any
                clinging to experiences of joy, nor being overcome by sad situations.
                In so doing, you try to reach and remain in the state of great
                equilibrium, where all good and bad, peace and distress, are devoid
                of true identity.

                DUDJOM RINPOCHE

                -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
              • kyabdro
                You can think of the nature of mind like a mirror, with five different powers or wisdoms. Its openness and vastness is the wisdom of all-encompassing
                Message 7 of 15 , Nov 29, 2002
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                  You can think of the nature of mind like a mirror, with five
                  different powers or "wisdoms." Its openness and vastness is
                  the "wisdom of all-encompassing space," the womb of compassion. Its
                  capacity to reflect in precise detail whatever comes before it is
                  the "mirrorlike wisdom." Its fundamental lack of any bias toward any
                  impression is the "equalizing wisdom." Its ability to distinguish
                  clearly, without confusing in any way the various different phenomena
                  that arise, is the "wisdom of discernment." And its potential of
                  having everything already accomplished, perfected, and spontaneously
                  present is the "all-accomplishing wisdom."

                  -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                  Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
                • kyabdro
                  For meditation to happen, calm and auspicious conditions have to be created. Before we have mastery over our minds, we need first to calm their environment. At
                  Message 8 of 15 , Nov 30, 2002
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                    For meditation to happen, calm and auspicious conditions have to be
                    created. Before we have mastery over our minds, we need first to calm
                    their environment.

                    At the moment, our minds are like a candle flame: unstable,
                    flickering, constantly changing, fanned by the violent winds of our
                    thoughts and emotions. The flame will burn steadily only when we can
                    calm the air around it; so we can only begin to glimpse and rest in
                    the nature of mind when we have stilled the turbulence of our
                    thoughts and emotions. On the other hand, once we have found a
                    stability in our meditation, noises and disturbances of every kind
                    will have far less impact.

                    -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                    Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
                  • kyabdro
                    The beginner s mind is an open mind, an empty mind, a ready mind, and if we really listen with a beginner s mind, we might really begin to hear. For if we
                    Message 9 of 15 , Dec 1, 2002
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                      The beginner's mind is an open mind, an empty mind, a ready mind, and
                      if we really listen with a beginner's mind, we might really begin to
                      hear. For if we listen with a silent mind, as free as possible from
                      the clamor of preconceived ideas, a possibility will be created for
                      the truth of the teachings to pierce us, and for the meaning of life
                      and death to become increasingly and startlingly clear.

                      My master Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche said: "The more and more you
                      listen, the more and more you hear; the more and more you hear, the
                      deeper and deeper your understanding becomes."

                      -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                      Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
                    • kyabdro
                      Gradually, as you remain open and mindful, and use a technique to focus your mind more and more, your negativity will slowly be defused; you begin to feel well
                      Message 10 of 15 , Dec 2, 2002
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                        Gradually, as you remain open and mindful, and use a technique to
                        focus your mind more and more, your negativity will slowly be
                        defused; you begin to feel well in your own skin, or, as the French
                        say, ĂȘtre bien dans sa peau ("well in your own skin"). From this
                        comes release and a profound ease. I think of this practice as the
                        most effective form of therapy and self-healing.


                        -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                        Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
                      • kyabdro
                        Every single negative thing we have ever thought or done has ultimately arisen from our grasping at a false self, and our cherishing of that false self, making
                        Message 11 of 15 , Dec 3, 2002
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                          Every single negative thing we have ever thought or done has
                          ultimately arisen from our grasping at a false self, and our
                          cherishing of that false self, making it the dearest and most
                          important element in our lives. All those negative thoughts,
                          emotions, desires, and actions that are the cause of our negative
                          karma are engendered by self-grasping and self-cherishing. They are
                          the dark, powerful magnet that attracts to us, life after life, every
                          obstacle, every misfortune, every anguish, every disaster, and so
                          they are the root cause of all the sufferings of samsara.

                          -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                          Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
                        • kyabdro
                          It is important to reflect calmly, again and again, that death is real and comes without warning. Don t be like the pigeon in the Tibetan proverb: He spends
                          Message 12 of 15 , Dec 4, 2002
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                            It is important to reflect calmly, again and again, that death is
                            real and comes without warning.

                            Don't be like the pigeon in the Tibetan proverb: He spends all night
                            fussing about, making his bed, and dawn comes up before he has even
                            had time to go to sleep.

                            -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                            Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
                          • kyabdro
                            Realizing the View subtly but completely transforms your vision of everything. More and more, I have come to realize how thoughts and concepts are all that
                            Message 13 of 15 , Dec 5, 2002
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                              Realizing the View subtly but completely transforms your vision of
                              everything. More and more, I have come to realize how thoughts and
                              concepts are all that block us from always being, quite simply, in
                              the absolute. Now I see clearly why the masters so often say: "Try
                              hard not to create too much hope and fear," for they only engender
                              more mental gossip. When the View is there, thoughts are seen for
                              what they truly are: fleeting and transparent, and only relative. You
                              see through everything directly, as if you had X-ray eyes. You do not
                              cling to thoughts and emotions or reject them; you welcome them all
                              within the vast embrace of Rigpa. The things you took so seriously
                              before - ambitions, plans, expectations, doubts, and passions - no
                              longer have any deep and anxious hold on you, for the View has helped
                              you to see the futility and pointlessness of them all, and born in
                              you a spirit of true renunciation.

                              -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                              Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
                            • kyabdro
                              Devotion is the purest, quickest, and simplest way to realize the nature of mind and all things. As we progress in it, the process reveals itself as
                              Message 14 of 15 , Dec 6, 2002
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                                Devotion is the purest, quickest, and simplest way to realize the
                                nature of mind and all things. As we progress in it, the process
                                reveals itself as wonderfully interdependent: We, from our side, try
                                continually to generate devotion, which itself generates glimpses of
                                the nature of mind, and these glimpses only enhance and deepen our
                                devotion to the master who is inspiring us. So in the end devotion
                                springs out of wisdom: devotion and the living experience of the
                                nature of mind become inseparable and inspire each other.

                                -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                                Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
                              • kyabdro
                                What is our life but a dance of transient forms? Isn t everything always changing? Doesn t everything we have done in the past seem like a dream now? The
                                Message 15 of 15 , Dec 7, 2002
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                                  What is our life but a dance of transient forms? Isn't everything
                                  always changing? Doesn't everything we have done in the past seem
                                  like a dream now? The friends we grew up with, the childhood haunts,
                                  those views and opinions we once held with such single-minded
                                  passion: We have left them all behind. Now, at this moment, reading
                                  this book seems vividly real to you. Even this page will soon be only
                                  a memory.

                                  -SOGYAL RINPOCHE in the book the Book: "Glimpse After Glimpse"

                                  Glimpses in your mail: http://www.rigpa.org/cgi-local/mojo.cgi
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