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Re: Creator of the GIF image file format receives a lifetime achievement award.

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  • Eric
    GIF was a stunning achievement back in 1987. I remember being able to view exchange and view images with 256 colors on my Myarc Geneve 9640 with IBM PCs and
    Message 1 of 5 , May 26, 2013
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      GIF was a stunning achievement back in 1987. I remember being able to view exchange and view images with 256 colors on my Myarc Geneve 9640 with IBM PCs and Amigas!

      Because of bandwidth and storage problems problems, it quickly overtook BMP & TIFF images and the method to send, receive, and store images.

      Not until compression methods devised by the Joint Photography Experts Group (JPG) did it fall out of fashion again mainly due to bandwidth and storage problems.

      Once dynamic access memory and virtual memory became very inexpensive and formats like Portable Networks Graphics (PNG) became the 'standard' because they could display much more detail in the images that didn't take up so much file space as BMP & TIFF images.

      Now GIF and its animated form has made a comeback over smartphone networks again because of its use of less bandwidth to exchange rather detailed images.



      --- In ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com, Richard Twyning <richardtwyning@...> wrote:
      >
      > http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/21/an-honor-for-the-creator-of-the-gif/
      > --
      > Sent from my Galaxy Note with K-9 Mail.
      >
    • Richard Twyning
      For me though just standard GIF images were always my preferred format because you don t lose any quality. They re always better for creating icons. I just
      Message 2 of 5 , May 27, 2013
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        For me though just standard GIF images were always my preferred format
        because you don't lose any quality. They're always better for creating
        icons.
        I just started a new job this year and they have a piece of software
        that's used worldwide that's written in VB6. It is being phased out
        now, but there's still things being added to it, so I had to create some
        GIF's last week, mainly because of the transparency.


        On 26/05/13 15:17, Eric wrote:
        > GIF was a stunning achievement back in 1987. I remember being able to view exchange and view images with 256 colors on my Myarc Geneve 9640 with IBM PCs and Amigas!
        >
        > Because of bandwidth and storage problems problems, it quickly overtook BMP & TIFF images and the method to send, receive, and store images.
        >
        > Not until compression methods devised by the Joint Photography Experts Group (JPG) did it fall out of fashion again mainly due to bandwidth and storage problems.
        >
        > Once dynamic access memory and virtual memory became very inexpensive and formats like Portable Networks Graphics (PNG) became the 'standard' because they could display much more detail in the images that didn't take up so much file space as BMP & TIFF images.
        >
        > Now GIF and its animated form has made a comeback over smartphone networks again because of its use of less bandwidth to exchange rather detailed images.
        >
        >
        >
      • Charles Richmond
        My memory is... the GIF format fell out of favor because of the Software Patent on LZW compression used to compress the bitmap. ... --
        Message 3 of 5 , May 27, 2013
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          My memory is... the GIF format "fell out of favor" because of the
          Software Patent on LZW compression used to compress the bitmap.

          On May 27, 2013, at 5:54 AM, Richard Twyning wrote:

          > For me though just standard GIF images were always my preferred format
          > because you don't lose any quality. They're always better for
          > creating
          > icons.
          > I just started a new job this year and they have a piece of software
          > that's used worldwide that's written in VB6. It is being phased out
          > now, but there's still things being added to it, so I had to create
          > some
          > GIF's last week, mainly because of the transparency.
          >
          >
          > On 26/05/13 15:17, Eric wrote:
          >> GIF was a stunning achievement back in 1987. I remember being able
          >> to view exchange and view images with 256 colors on my Myarc
          >> Geneve 9640 with IBM PCs and Amigas!
          >>
          >> Because of bandwidth and storage problems problems, it quickly
          >> overtook BMP & TIFF images and the method to send, receive, and
          >> store images.
          >>
          >> Not until compression methods devised by the Joint Photography
          >> Experts Group (JPG) did it fall out of fashion again mainly due to
          >> bandwidth and storage problems.
          >>
          >> Once dynamic access memory and virtual memory became very
          >> inexpensive and formats like Portable Networks Graphics (PNG)
          >> became the 'standard' because they could display much more detail
          >> in the images that didn't take up so much file space as BMP & TIFF
          >> images.
          >>
          >> Now GIF and its animated form has made a comeback over smartphone
          >> networks again because of its use of less bandwidth to exchange
          >> rather detailed images.
          >>
          >>
          >>

          --
          +----------------------------------------+
          |.....Charles and Francis Richmond.......|
          |........................................|
          |..plano dot net at aquaporin4 dot com...|
          +----------------------------------------+
        • Gregg Eshelman
          ... GIF also only supports 8 bit color, a maximum of 256 colors, though they can be *any* 256 colors, optionally including one transparent color. There s two
          Message 4 of 5 , May 28, 2013
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            --- On Mon, 5/27/13, Charles Richmond <old_computers@...> wrote:

            > My memory is... the GIF format "fell
            > out of favor" because of theĀ 
            > Software Patent on LZW compression used to compress the
            > bitmap.

            GIF also only supports 8 bit color, a maximum of 256 colors, though they can be *any* 256 colors, optionally including one transparent color.

            There's two GIF formats. The original from 1987 and GIF89a which was (obviously) introduced in 1989.

            GIF89a has options for storing data within the image file. The first software to use the GIF89a format was FractINT, a mathematical fractal image generating program that could store the formula and (for some fractals) the progress of the image generation so it could be paused and resumed. Quite useful back when people were using PCs with 12 or 16 Mhz 80286 CPUs for this and dreaming of owning a 20 or 25 Mhz 80386 so they could make fractal images in a few hours instead of a few days. ;-)
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