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Re: F18A - Work If Socketed? (Answered my own question)

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  • Kchula-Rrit
    After posting (of course) I took out a TI99/4A I had killed years ago trying to install a memory expansion to check-out locations for the VGA connector. To my
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 14, 2012
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      After posting (of course) I took out a TI99/4A I had killed years ago trying to install a memory expansion to check-out locations for the VGA connector. To my surprise, I found that the 9918 chip is socketed-- cool!

      Makes installation a lot less painful.

      I'm assuming it would be a bad idea to leave off the metal shields so, get out the tin snips.

      K-R.

      --- In ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com, "Kchula-Rrit" <kchularrit@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > I'm getting ready to install the F18A into Tortise, my beloved Black/Aluminum TI99/4A. Rather than soldering it to the CPU board, I was thinking of mounting the F18A into a socket.
      >
      > Has anyone tried doing so, and did it work OK?
      >
      > It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?
      >
      > K-R.
      >
    • wmaalouli
      The metal shield is apparently not needed when you have an F18A in place, however it does no harm to keep it in place. In addition to acting as a heat sink to
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 14, 2012
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        The metal shield is apparently not needed when you have an F18A in place, however it does no harm to keep it in place. In addition to acting as a heat sink to the 9918 chip, it is also an RF interference barrier. Since CRT's are now long gone, and unless you are into some kind of radio hobby, they really have no good function at this point.
        As far as I'm concerned, the F18A is the coolest expansion ever for the TI.

        Walid

        --- In ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com, "Kchula-Rrit" <kchularrit@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > After posting (of course) I took out a TI99/4A I had killed years ago trying to install a memory expansion to check-out locations for the VGA connector. To my surprise, I found that the 9918 chip is socketed-- cool!
        >
        > Makes installation a lot less painful.
        >
        > I'm assuming it would be a bad idea to leave off the metal shields so, get out the tin snips.
        >
        > K-R.
        >
        > --- In ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com, "Kchula-Rrit" <kchularrit@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > I'm getting ready to install the F18A into Tortise, my beloved Black/Aluminum TI99/4A. Rather than soldering it to the CPU board, I was thinking of mounting the F18A into a socket.
        > >
        > > Has anyone tried doing so, and did it work OK?
        > >
        > > It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?
        > >
        > > K-R.
        > >
        >
      • Gregory McGill
        I left mine on, just bent out a bit for the ribbion cable to exit under it. As you found out the chip is socketed, there s info in the paper included with the
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 14, 2012
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          I left mine on, just bent out a bit for the ribbion cable to exit under it. As you found out the chip is socketed, there's info in the paper included with the F18A that explains that as well.

          Greg


          On Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 3:14 PM, Kchula-Rrit <kchularrit@...> wrote:

          After posting (of course) I took out a TI99/4A I had killed years ago trying to install a memory expansion to check-out locations for the VGA connector.  To my surprise, I found that the 9918 chip is socketed-- cool!

          Makes installation a lot less painful.

          I'm assuming it would be a bad idea to leave off the metal shields so, get out the tin snips.

          K-R.

          --- In ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com, "Kchula-Rrit" <kchularrit@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > I'm getting ready to install the F18A into Tortise, my beloved Black/Aluminum TI99/4A.  Rather than soldering it to the CPU board, I was thinking of mounting the F18A into a socket.
          >
          > Has anyone tried doing so, and did it work OK?
          >
          > It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?
          >
          > K-R.
          >




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        • Gregg Eshelman
          ... It s made to plug into a socket. Pull out the TMS9918A chip and plug the F18A in. I dunno if you have to remove the chunk of metal that s serving as a heat
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 14, 2012
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            ----- Original Message -----

            > From: Kchula-Rrit <kchularrit@...>
            > To: ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com
            > Cc:
            > Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 3:09 PM
            > Subject: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?
            >
            >
            > I'm getting ready to install the F18A into Tortise, my beloved
            > Black/Aluminum TI99/4A.  Rather than soldering it to the CPU board, I was
            > thinking of mounting the F18A into a socket.
            >
            > Has anyone tried doing so, and did it work OK?
            >
            > It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?

            It's made to plug into a socket. Pull out the TMS9918A chip and plug the F18A in. I dunno if you have to remove the chunk of metal that's serving as a heat sink for the old chip, if your TI has that attached to the RFI shield.
          • Gary Collins
            I used to deal with this type of chip all day long. The best way to get them out is push a 1/4 or 1/2 screwdriver under the end of the chip and force it
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 14, 2012
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              I used to deal with this type of chip all day long. The best way to get them out is push a 1/4'' or 1/2'' screwdriver under the end of the chip and force it down the middle prying up. This sounds brute but, be sure this is the best way to pull it, carefully of course prying up all the way. With a perfected method an assembly line worker  can pull 40 to 50 chips an hour and replace them. Then bend the pins on the new chip in by laying the chip on it's side and press down on a firm surface until the pins are parallel on both sides. Align the chip then push it into the socket. Watch the polarity the notch on the end of the chips should face the same direction. Hope this helps.
               
              Gary

              From: Gregg Eshelman <g_alan_e@...>
              To: "ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com" <ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 10:54 PM
              Subject: Re: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?

               
              ----- Original Message -----

              > From: Kchula-Rrit <kchularrit@...>
              > To: ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com
              > Cc:
              > Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 3:09 PM
              > Subject: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?
              >
              >
              > I'm getting ready to install the F18A into Tortise, my beloved
              > Black/Aluminum TI99/4A.  Rather than soldering it to the CPU board, I was
              > thinking of mounting the F18A into a socket.
              >
              > Has anyone tried doing so, and did it work OK?
              >
              > It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?

              It's made to plug into a socket. Pull out the TMS9918A chip and plug the F18A in. I dunno if you have to remove the chunk of metal that's serving as a heat sink for the old chip, if your TI has that attached to the RFI shield.



            • Gary Collins
                Gary ________________________________ From: Gary Collins To: ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday,
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 14, 2012
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                Gary

                From: Gary Collins <technopeasant42@...>
                To: "ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com" <ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 11:21 PM
                Subject: Re: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?

                 
                I used to deal with this type of chip all day long. The best way to get them out is push a 1/4'' or 1/2'' screwdriver under the end of the chip and force it down the middle prying up. This sounds brute but, be sure this is the best way to pull it, carefully of course prying up all the way. With a perfected method an assembly line worker  can pull 40 to 50 chips an hour and replace them. Then bend the pins on the new chip in by laying the chip on it's side and press down on a firm surface until the pins are parallel on both sides. Align the chip then push it into the socket. Watch the polarity the notch on the end of the chips should face the same direction. Hope this helps.
                 
                Gary

                From: Gregg Eshelman <g_alan_e@...>
                To: "ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com" <ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 10:54 PM
                Subject: Re: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?

                 
                ----- Original Message -----

                > From: Kchula-Rrit <kchularrit@...>
                > To: ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com
                > Cc:
                > Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 3:09 PM
                > Subject: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?
                >
                >
                > I'm getting ready to install the F18A into Tortise, my beloved
                > Black/Aluminum TI99/4A.  Rather than soldering it to the CPU board, I was
                > thinking of mounting the F18A into a socket.
                >
                > Has anyone tried doing so, and did it work OK?
                >
                > It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?

                It's made to plug into a socket. Pull out the TMS9918A chip and plug the F18A in. I dunno if you have to remove the chunk of metal that's serving as a heat sink for the old chip, if your TI has that attached to the RFI shield.





              • Tursi
                ... Yep, that s all it takes. I believe I read once Matthew recommending removal of the chunk of heat sink metal -- if you leave it it must NOT touch the F18A.
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 14, 2012
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                  >> It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?
                  >It's made to plug into a socket. Pull out the TMS9918A chip and plug the
                  >F18A in. I dunno if you have to remove the chunk
                  >of metal that's serving as a heat sink for the old chip, if your TI has
                  >that attached to the RFI shield.

                  Yep, that's all it takes. I believe I read once Matthew recommending removal
                  of the chunk of heat sink metal -- if you leave it it must NOT touch the
                  F18A. I removed it from mine but kept the metal shell. I routed the ribbon
                  cable out through the hole already present for the A/V jack (then mounted
                  the connector above and to the side of that). This way I still use the
                  original A/V connector for audio. It's not as fragile as you may think, I
                  probably treated mine pretty roughly during the testing periods (including
                  tugging it out of the socket by accident via the cable, and across the
                  floor), and it's still fine. I wouldn't /recommend/ abuse, but it's pretty
                  darn solid. :)

                  Some machines it's harder for -- the ColecoVision is not socketted for
                  example, but we have it good and easy on the TI. :)
                • Insane Multitasker
                  Some similar tricks I learned doing repairs... If you gently turn the screwdriver a very small amount (clockwise then counter) as you slowly push the
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 14, 2012
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                    Some similar tricks I learned doing repairs...
                     
                    If you gently 'turn' the screwdriver a very small amount (clockwise then counter) as you slowly push the screwdriver from one end to the other along the long axis, the rocking motion will help to release the legs.  It also helps to "start" both ends to relieve the tension and reduce the force required to remove the chip.  A wider chip may require a wider blade.
                     
                    Keeping some pressure on the chip with your free thumb helps to ensure the chip doesn't pop out prematurely, often the cause of bent legs or a damaged socket.
                     
                    If prying, careful not to pry at an angle that could scrape or damage traces on the board underneath the chip.  Those are a real bear to find later ;)
                     
                     

                    To: ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com
                    From: technopeasant42@...
                    Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2012 20:21:37 -0700
                    Subject: Re: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?



                    I used to deal with this type of chip all day long. The best way to get them out is push a 1/4'' or 1/2'' screwdriver under the end of the chip and force it down the middle prying up. This sounds brute but, be sure this is the best way to pull it, carefully of course prying up all the way. With a perfected method an assembly line worker  can pull 40 to 50 chips an hour and replace them. Then bend the pins on the new chip in by laying the chip on it's side and press down on a firm surface until the pins are parallel on both sides. Align the chip then push it into the socket. Watch the polarity the notch on the end of the chips should face the same direction. Hope this helps.
                     
                    Gary

                    From: Gregg Eshelman <g_alan_e@...>
                    To: "ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com" <ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 10:54 PM
                    Subject: Re: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?

                     
                    ----- Original Message -----

                    > From: Kchula-Rrit <kchularrit@...>
                    > To: ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com
                    > Cc:
                    > Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 3:09 PM
                    > Subject: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?
                    >
                    >
                    > I'm getting ready to install the F18A into Tortise, my beloved
                    > Black/Aluminum TI99/4A.  Rather than soldering it to the CPU board, I was
                    > thinking of mounting the F18A into a socket.
                    >
                    > Has anyone tried doing so, and did it work OK?
                    >
                    > It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?

                    It's made to plug into a socket. Pull out the TMS9918A chip and plug the F18A in. I dunno if you have to remove the chunk of metal that's serving as a heat sink for the old chip, if your TI has that attached to the RFI shield.





                  • Gary Collins
                    He s right the twist is a nice twist. It works even better with a 1/2 screwdriver.   Gary ________________________________ From: Insane Multitasker
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 14, 2012
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                      He's right the twist is a nice twist. It works even better with a 1/2'' screwdriver.
                       
                      Gary

                      From: Insane Multitasker <insane_m@...>
                      To: ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2012 12:02 AM
                      Subject: RE: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?

                       
                      Some similar tricks I learned doing repairs...
                       
                      If you gently 'turn' the screwdriver a very small amount (clockwise then counter) as you slowly push the screwdriver from one end to the other along the long axis, the rocking motion will help to release the legs.  It also helps to "start" both ends to relieve the tension and reduce the force required to remove the chip.  A wider chip may require a wider blade.
                       
                      Keeping some pressure on the chip with your free thumb helps to ensure the chip doesn't pop out prematurely, often the cause of bent legs or a damaged socket.
                       
                      If prying, careful not to pry at an angle that could scrape or damage traces on the board underneath the chip.  Those are a real bear to find later ;)
                       
                       

                      To: ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com
                      From: technopeasant42@...
                      Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2012 20:21:37 -0700
                      Subject: Re: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?



                      I used to deal with this type of chip all day long. The best way to get them out is push a 1/4'' or 1/2'' screwdriver under the end of the chip and force it down the middle prying up. This sounds brute but, be sure this is the best way to pull it, carefully of course prying up all the way. With a perfected method an assembly line worker  can pull 40 to 50 chips an hour and replace them. Then bend the pins on the new chip in by laying the chip on it's side and press down on a firm surface until the pins are parallel on both sides. Align the chip then push it into the socket. Watch the polarity the notch on the end of the chips should face the same direction. Hope this helps.
                       
                      Gary

                      From: Gregg Eshelman <g_alan_e@...>
                      To: "ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com" <ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 10:54 PM
                      Subject: Re: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?

                       
                      ----- Original Message -----

                      > From: Kchula-Rrit <kchularrit@...>
                      > To: ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com
                      > Cc:
                      > Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 3:09 PM
                      > Subject: [TI-99/4A] F18A - Work If Socketed?
                      >
                      >
                      > I'm getting ready to install the F18A into Tortise, my beloved
                      > Black/Aluminum TI99/4A.  Rather than soldering it to the CPU board, I was
                      > thinking of mounting the F18A into a socket.
                      >
                      > Has anyone tried doing so, and did it work OK?
                      >
                      > It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?

                      It's made to plug into a socket. Pull out the TMS9918A chip and plug the F18A in. I dunno if you have to remove the chunk of metal that's serving as a heat sink for the old chip, if your TI has that attached to the RFI shield.







                    • Kchula-Rrit
                      My thanks to everyone for their advice. I used to build computers for a living, back when they were fun, as I tend to say. My favorite chip-extraction tool
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 15, 2012
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                        My thanks to everyone for their advice. I used to build computers for a living, "back when they were fun," as I tend to say. My favorite chip-extraction tool was needle-nose pliers. Several spectacular failures, like the dead TI console I have, sort of shattered my confidence in building stuff. I'll see what I can do.

                        I'm thinking of lining the RF shield with some red plastic tape (it's like 2-inch wide contact paper) to reduce the probability of shorting-out anything.

                        K-R.

                        --- In ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com, "wmaalouli" <wmaalouli@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > The metal shield is apparently not needed when you have an F18A in place, however it does no harm to keep it in place. ...
                        > As far as I'm concerned, the F18A is the coolest expansion ever for the TI.
                        >
                        > Walid
                      • VICTOR STEERUP
                        Finally got my F-18 installed and running.  A little more complicated as I used the console I bring to the monthly Chicago meetings that has TI Extended Basic
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 19, 2012
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                          Finally got my F-18 installed and running.  A little more complicated as I used the console I bring to the monthly Chicago meetings that has TI Extended Basic hard-wired to the motherboard, with an enable-disable switch and a console reset button wiring to get in the way.  Used a small cutting wheel to make an opening the size of the F-18 in the top metal cover, and bent up the back edge and taped it where the cable comes through.  The big metal plate the connector is mounted to got epoxied to the back of the top of the console.  Very similar, but smaller, installation to the T.I.M.  Used a dab of silicone sealer in each corner of the F-18 to stabilize it, what I should have done with the T.I.M. so it wouldn't have shaken loose during my monthly trips to Evanston.   Works good, clear, distinct image.  No 9938 specific program works with it. I had some graphics demos that ran in XB with assembly links, would like to rewrite them in Turboforth, unless someone comes up with Assembly language links that can be called in XB like X80 and XHI could.  Yeah, I know F-18 dosen't have the 128 k extra VDP the T.I.M had, don't know if it is possible...  I think the program Sound FX could use that memory area...  as well as Y.A.P.P.   Boot works flawlessly with "W" for widescreen to get into 80 col. mode, loads and reads text fine.   Funnelweb 4.31 gets into DiskReview 80, but  has problems. Dang, that was nice, being able to sector edit in asci and hex at the same time.  Well, the F-18 accomplishes its stated task, to produce a crisp display on modern monitors that are inexpensive & easily available.  Highly recommend it to
                        • VICTOR STEERUP
                          Sorry about my last post. I ran out of ink . The last word should have been everyone Victor
                          Message 12 of 14 , Aug 20, 2012
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                            Sorry about my last post. I "ran out of ink".

                            The last word should have been "everyone"
                          • Matthew
                            ... As you have already discovered, the 99/4A has a socket already in place for the VDP. The F18A was designed to be used in a socket and not directly
                            Message 13 of 14 , Aug 24, 2012
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                              --- In ti99-4a@yahoogroups.com, "Kchula-Rrit" <kchularrit@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > I'm getting ready to install the F18A into Tortise, my beloved Black/Aluminum TI99/4A. Rather than soldering it to the CPU board, I was thinking of mounting the F18A into a socket.
                              >
                              > Has anyone tried doing so, and did it work OK?
                              >
                              > It looks pretty fragile, so any ideas on how to secure it?
                              >
                              > K-R.
                              >

                              As you have already discovered, the 99/4A has a socket already in place for the VDP. The F18A was designed to be used in a socket and not directly soldered to a motherboard (although it would work fine, the F18A is wider than the 600-mil package of the original VDP). The socket allows the F18A to be up and out of the way of surrounding components.

                              While the board itself is pretty durable, the PCB pins bend easily so proper handling is recommended.

                              I also recommend removing the original 9918A heat-sink from the top metal shield. I usually remove the two screws holding the heat-sink to the shield *before* removing the shield so the heat-sink stays attached to the 9918A.

                              Most of the F18A components are thinner than the original 9918A, but the jumpers make the F18A taller than the 9918A and the heat-sink will definitely interfere with the F18A's jumpers if left attached to the top metal shield.

                              Whether to put the metal shield back on is up to you, but it should not be a problem. As others have noted, there are plenty of ways to do the case mod, and everyone will probably do it a little bit differently. Eventually I'll have some photos and detailed instructions on my website for all the various systems I have put the F18A into.

                              Matthew
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