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Re: [thrower] throwing tools

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  • brknfthr@aol.com
    Hi Firebringer I know there are a lot of folks on here who throw a lot more than knives and hawks, personally I ll throw anything that even remotely looks like
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 1, 2006
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      Hi Firebringer
      I know there are a lot of folks on here who throw a lot more than knives
      and hawks, personally I'll throw anything that even remotely looks like it will
      stick!
      I'm also a member of a Blowgun club which is for another list but you
      might want to check out NSBA (National Sport Blowgun Assoc.) dot com of course.
      As a result of a lot of bad equipment out there to throw with (at the time
      Olsen OK Throwers) I started making my own, I've been at it for some time now
      and can and will make just about anything you can dream up.
      I make knives, axes, throwing cards in steel and titanium, some swords,
      dart's, spikes and various Martial Art's type items but as a hobby business can
      barely keep up with the demand.
      Anyway some of the best throwers in the world are on this list and willing
      to help anyone for the asking, check out the www.throwzini.com site for as
      much info as you can handle and welcome!


      Joe Darrah
      BROKENFEATHER
      Custom Knives
      (Stick With It!)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • sasquatchmachinist
      Hey Joe: This may sound stupid, but what other materials might work for edged weapons~ glass mixture, ceramic, zirconium[probably too pricy]. Would like to
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 1, 2006
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        Hey Joe:

        This may sound stupid, but what other materials might work for
        edged weapons~ glass mixture, ceramic, zirconium[probably too pricy].

        Would like to hear your thoughts on it.

        Your friend, Jon.




        --- In thrower@yahoogroups.com, brknfthr@... wrote:
        >
        > Hi Firebringer
        > I know there are a lot of folks on here who throw a lot more
        than knives
        > and hawks, personally I'll throw anything that even remotely looks
        like it will
        > stick!
        > I'm also a member of a Blowgun club which is for another list
        but you
        > might want to check out NSBA (National Sport Blowgun Assoc.) dot
        com of course.
        > As a result of a lot of bad equipment out there to throw with
        (at the time
        > Olsen OK Throwers) I started making my own, I've been at it for
        some time now
        > and can and will make just about anything you can dream up.
        > I make knives, axes, throwing cards in steel and titanium, some
        swords,
        > dart's, spikes and various Martial Art's type items but as a hobby
        business can
        > barely keep up with the demand.
        > Anyway some of the best throwers in the world are on this list
        and willing
        > to help anyone for the asking, check out the www.throwzini.com
        site for as
        > much info as you can handle and welcome!
        >
        >
        > Joe Darrah
        > BROKENFEATHER
        > Custom Knives
        > (Stick With It!)
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Ed
        Hey Jon, Kyocera makes probably the sharpest knives on the planet out of a secret ceramic mixture. The edge is sharper than steel can be worked and lasts
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 2, 2006
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          Hey Jon,

          Kyocera makes probably the sharpest knives on the planet out of a secret
          ceramic
          mixture. The edge is sharper than steel can be worked and lasts longer than
          steel
          edges. Just don't drop the thing - it can shatter like glass :)

          Knives have been made from almost everything you can think of. The South
          American
          natives of Aztec and Mayan ancestry used knapping (knocking of flakes of
          materials)
          to make knife edges from natural outcroppings of obsidian glass. These
          edges are still
          sharper than anything mankind can mechanically produce.

          Almost any kind of rock can be knapped or ground to a blade but it breaks
          fairly easily.
          Lexan could be used, but it will dull or bend since it gets its strength
          from "giving" like
          liquid even though it's a solid. Metals of course are all fair game, but
          the toughness and
          durability of many would be bad. Titanium would be a great blade source but
          it's way too
          light for my taste.

          I personally am going to experiment with kinds of wood. I'm a woodworker
          and I know many
          of our ancestors used wood for spears and blades. They hardened it by
          slightly charring
          the surface which makes it denser since it turns it into carbon. It would
          still be brittle but
          you could make some incredible show pieces to wear.

          I hope this helps some - and Joe might might know of more cool materials
          you can play with
          but I was checking mail and working on my morning coffee so I jumped in :))

          Be well,

          SpEsHuL eD



          At 06:19 AM 4/2/2006 +0000, you wrote:

          >Hey Joe:
          >
          >This may sound stupid, but what other materials might work for
          >edged weapons~ glass mixture, ceramic, zirconium[probably too pricy].
          >
          >Would like to hear your thoughts on it.
          >
          >Your friend, Jon.


          --
          No virus found in this outgoing message.
          Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
          Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.4/299 - Release Date: 3/31/2006
        • brknfthr@aol.com
          Hi Jon Obviously Boker has been doing the ceramic thing for some time, Choate Machine & Tool out of California has been doing the glass/zytel thing for many
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 2, 2006
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            Hi Jon
            Obviously Boker has been doing the ceramic thing for some time, Choate
            Machine & Tool out of California has been doing the glass/zytel thing for many
            years with their Executive Letter Opener and Executive Ice Scraper so too has
            Cold Steel been using the glass/polymer resin type implements that they sell.
            As far as other material there ar a number of Flint Knappers who use old
            bottles and glass to make arrow point's and knife blades as well as Obsidian and
            variuos types of stone including Quartz and Flint.
            Also there are several makers including our own Jason Chasse who make
            knives from Carbon Fiber and G-10 but I think they fall into the glass/polymer
            category and obviously you can use wood and bone for blade/weapon making, I think
            anything else is going to fall into some other category that I am not familiar
            with.
            So in the Animal category you have Bone, Antler, Teeth in the Vegetable
            category you have various Woods, Thorns and Leaves and Mineral would cover all of
            your stone and natural metals and I even have a couple of knives in the
            process of being finished that are made of cut slabs of meteorites so anything
            other than that I don't know.
            I guess the only thing that can limit what you can come up with is
            imagination?

            Joe


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • david jester
            ed make me a set of your toothpick knives. are they legal? lol 1/2 spin d.f.jester@juno.com or d.f.jester@earthlink.net [Non-text portions of this message
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 2, 2006
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              ed make me a set of your toothpick knives. are they legal? lol 1/2 spin


              d.f.jester@... or d.f.jester@...

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • sasquatchmachinist
              TY Ed, I had known of lead and gold chrystal[sp], but was wondering about a Titanium/Zirconium chrystal[sp] combination. I thought I read somewhere that
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 4, 2006
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                TY Ed, I had known of lead and gold chrystal[sp], but was wondering
                about a Titanium/Zirconium chrystal[sp] combination.

                I thought I read somewhere that obsidian fractures down to one
                molecule wide on the edge?

                Food for thought, Jon.






                --- In thrower@yahoogroups.com, Ed <aslow@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Hey Jon,
                >
                > Kyocera makes probably the sharpest knives on the planet out of a
                secret
                > ceramic
                > mixture. The edge is sharper than steel can be worked and lasts
                longer than
                > steel
                > edges. Just don't drop the thing - it can shatter like glass :)
                >
                > Knives have been made from almost everything you can think of. The
                South
                > American
                > natives of Aztec and Mayan ancestry used knapping (knocking of
                flakes of
                > materials)
                > to make knife edges from natural outcroppings of obsidian glass.
                These
                > edges are still
                > sharper than anything mankind can mechanically produce.
                >
                > Almost any kind of rock can be knapped or ground to a blade but it
                breaks
                > fairly easily.
                > Lexan could be used, but it will dull or bend since it gets its
                strength
                > from "giving" like
                > liquid even though it's a solid. Metals of course are all fair
                game, but
                > the toughness and
                > durability of many would be bad. Titanium would be a great blade
                source but
                > it's way too
                > light for my taste.
                >
                > I personally am going to experiment with kinds of wood. I'm a
                woodworker
                > and I know many
                > of our ancestors used wood for spears and blades. They hardened it
                by
                > slightly charring
                > the surface which makes it denser since it turns it into carbon.
                It would
                > still be brittle but
                > you could make some incredible show pieces to wear.
                >
                > I hope this helps some - and Joe might might know of more cool
                materials
                > you can play with
                > but I was checking mail and working on my morning coffee so I
                jumped in :))
                >
                > Be well,
                >
                > SpEsHuL eD
                >
                >
                >
                > At 06:19 AM 4/2/2006 +0000, you wrote:
                >
                > >Hey Joe:
                > >
                > >This may sound stupid, but what other materials might work for
                > >edged weapons~ glass mixture, ceramic, zirconium[probably too
                pricy].
                > >
                > >Would like to hear your thoughts on it.
                > >
                > >Your friend, Jon.
                >
                >
                > --
                > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
                > Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.4/299 - Release Date:
                3/31/2006
                >
              • sasquatchmachinist
                Someone supposedly tried submarine metal, but wore-out their inserts/bits too quickly to make it cost effective[might all have been smokeNmirrors, all I had
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 4, 2006
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                  Someone supposedly tried submarine metal, but wore-out their
                  inserts/bits too quickly to make it cost effective[might all have
                  been smokeNmirrors, all I had was unreliable assertions]

                  TY Joe, Jon.





                  --- In thrower@yahoogroups.com, brknfthr@... wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Jon
                  > Obviously Boker has been doing the ceramic thing for some time,
                  Choate
                  > Machine & Tool out of California has been doing the glass/zytel
                  thing for many
                  > years with their Executive Letter Opener and Executive Ice Scraper
                  so too has
                  > Cold Steel been using the glass/polymer resin type implements that
                  they sell.
                  > As far as other material there ar a number of Flint Knappers who
                  use old
                  > bottles and glass to make arrow point's and knife blades as well
                  as Obsidian and
                  > variuos types of stone including Quartz and Flint.
                  > Also there are several makers including our own Jason Chasse who
                  make
                  > knives from Carbon Fiber and G-10 but I think they fall into the
                  glass/polymer
                  > category and obviously you can use wood and bone for blade/weapon
                  making, I think
                  > anything else is going to fall into some other category that I am
                  not familiar
                  > with.
                  > So in the Animal category you have Bone, Antler, Teeth in the
                  Vegetable
                  > category you have various Woods, Thorns and Leaves and Mineral
                  would cover all of
                  > your stone and natural metals and I even have a couple of knives
                  in the
                  > process of being finished that are made of cut slabs of meteorites
                  so anything
                  > other than that I don't know.
                  > I guess the only thing that can limit what you can come up with
                  is
                  > imagination?
                  >

                  > Joe
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • brknfthr@aol.com
                  Have worked with some T-5 Army Tank metal and Dozer blade stuff, very hard but as I recently learned first from 1/2 Spin then later in Blade Magazine you can
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 4, 2006
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                    Have worked with some T-5 Army Tank metal and Dozer blade stuff, very hard
                    but as I recently learned first from 1/2 Spin then later in Blade Magazine you
                    can drill hardened metal with Masonry Bits and now 1/2 Spin tells me he's
                    using Glass/Ceramic bits to drill hardened metal.
                    He better watch it or he's going to become a knife maker!

                    Joe D.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • sasquatchmachinist
                    Might use Tugsten-Carbide, diamond-dust, or flamecut and grind???Jon. ... very hard ... Magazine you ... me he s
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 5, 2006
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                      Might use Tugsten-Carbide, diamond-dust, or flamecut and grind???Jon.


                      --- In thrower@yahoogroups.com, brknfthr@... wrote:
                      >
                      > Have worked with some T-5 Army Tank metal and Dozer blade stuff,
                      very hard
                      > but as I recently learned first from 1/2 Spin then later in Blade
                      Magazine you
                      > can drill hardened metal with Masonry Bits and now 1/2 Spin tells
                      me he's
                      > using Glass/Ceramic bits to drill hardened metal.
                      > He better watch it or he's going to become a knife maker!
                      >

                      > Joe D.
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
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