Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Dojo Thoughts

Expand Messages
  • threeriversaikido-owner@yahoogroups.com
    in response to mikes wonderful thoughts... ultimately after you get past the technical part of the techniques and even when you get past the fear of multiple
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 16, 2013
      in response to mikes wonderful thoughts...
      ultimately after you get past the technical part of the techniques and even when you get past the fear of multiple attackers or even larger size opponents...or ukes: when you transcend the physical challenges of Aikido you eventually develop your aikido for the pure asththic ,then you truly become the (martial)artist.

      Sensei
    • Mike Swederska
      I would like to talk about a question that has been asked me over the years of teaching aikido that keeps coming up. The question seems to follow after a class
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 3, 2014

        I would like to talk about a question that has been asked me over the years of teaching aikido that keeps coming up. The question seems to follow after a class of focusing on blending “Awase” with ukes attack. The idea of blending with ones opponent is frequently used by teachers such as myself for explaining the mechanics of working inside ukes attack to match the speed, energy and direction of the attack. When this is accomplished the nage will avoided the attack and take uke balance and end with a commanding technique.  

         

        Actually this is just a simple explanation of what the idea of blending is. In the act of naga being attacked and then reacting with a blend.  Uke is always leading the attack. Because of that, nage is always trying to stay out in front with what they hope is the correct reaction in body or hand. If you were up against a skilled uke with really good quick rapid fire movements. I don’t think anyone can continually react correctly that fast every time. So how should an aikidoka survive in a fight? That is just what everyone is thinking right now.

         

         

        Let me say this first before I go any farther. In a situation that two people are about to do battle their sense are turned all the way up. Now that the stage is set I will continue.

         

        Well, if the nage was to seize the moment just before the uke committed to their attack the uke would then be reacting the nage. Now who has to keep up to survive? Nage can do this with so many different things. Let me give you some examples. The nage could simply shift a little in their stance or move gently in an encroaching manor to signal to uke something is about to happen. Nage could even just blink or start to breath differently. I once had an opponent smile every time he was about to throw a punch. I know that i have consistently corrected students for not making eye contact “metsuke”. By staying connected “mitsube” this way your uke will really feel those subtle signals that you are wanting them to react too. All these things and many more are to attack the mind of uke. I know now your thinking of Atemi and Kiai because I am always mentioning how those items attack the mind of uke. Think about where and when you would use these two tools.  Believe me the founder used atemi and kiai all the time.

         

         

        On a note about atemi and kiai. You may think I am now getting off my original subject but I feel these two items need to be addressed in a important note. Because they are an iatrical part of aikido and major part of the answer to the original question.

         

        I have been adding the atemi to my techniques in class but with caution. I was once told that the attemi was slowly being removed from aikido training because people were getting hurt. I am finding out that atemi is a key component of aikido and must not be left out but practiced with caution. I don’t know where the idea of not using kiai in aikido comes from but there are plenty of pictures of the founder with  facial expressions showing the act of kiai.

         

        Mike Swederska

        Shin Gane Aikido

         

         

      • Shur-Way
        I was reading an article the other day in a martial arts mag. The article was about the new at that time 3D computer generated videos being presented on
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 13, 2015

          I was reading an article the other day in a martial arts mag. The article was about the new “at that time” 3D computer generated videos being presented on YouTube. I read the article because it seems that everyone has spent time with U-tube sensei. I have been noticing over the many years of being in a brick and mortar dojo that students spend their time viewing the multitude of video on the web to get their personal incites on all martial arts.

          I personally applaud everyone that is that interested in looking at all ways to fulfill the want of knowledge in the martial arts. I personally have found that reading about the ideas of martial arts is a fun way to stay connected when I am not on the mat.

          So this leads me to a conversation that I had the other night with some of my students at the end of class. Like I said earlier, I am for all students quenching their thirst for all that is martial art via books and video. Where I do draw the line is that all students need to understand that this kind of knowledge is not the same and never will be what you get in a brick and mortar dojo. To start with the one on one relationship that you get with the student and instructor can never be realized with U-tube sensei. The friendship of other students in and out of the dojo is not in a book.  The actual feeling of being the Uke in a technique can never be realized watching. The self confidence to know that you can truly perform the prescribed technique after the class is over.  None of these and plenty of other reason will not come from just reading books and watching videos.

          Something else I was mentioning and that is for every day that as a student does not train and substitute time on the mat for U-tube sensei or books can never be gotten back. So my message is; don’t give up one minute of real training in a brick and mortar dojo for U-tube sensei or books. You can never get back that time on the mat lost. ­­

          Swederska sensei

           

        • augheyj
          To followup and reinforce what Senpai said, I spend a lot of time watching videos, and over the years, what I get out of watching videos changes dramatically.
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 14, 2015
            To followup and reinforce what Senpai said, I spend a lot of time watching videos, and over the years, what I get out of watching videos changes dramatically.  In the beginning, it was wide-eyed wonderment - and over time evolved into something somewhat instructional with the big footnote that Senpai said so eloquently.

            While watching anything, what your brain imagines it can do and what you can actually achieve are often completely independent.  After watching an exciting movie like Star War or The Matrix, I feel as if I could actually perform those theatrical feats.  But the limitation of my body and the constraints of physics don't allow for that to happen.

            With something that isn't unrestricted by science fiction, reality is achievable, but only if your mind and body are in sync.  That's what locker room pep talks are all about.  Get the mental excitement and goals visualized, and with the corresponding training to support it you can achieve it.

            I can recall spending hours on weekend evenings combing through YouTube videos of Tissier, Bruno, and others; psyching myself out believing that I developed abilities by simply watching.  Why not, during most of my professional career I've been able to do this.  Monday morning training would deliver a healthy dose of reality when my perceived abilities did not materialize.

            One last story, I can recall during my first couple of months of training I came across the book "Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere".  I read that book from cover to cover, and came to class ready to show off my newly founded abilities.  Senpai Aida looked at me ready to do warmup tenkan, sighed, slumped her shoulders, and said, "Ok, let's fix your stance."  I'm thinking, "No no, just let me show you what I know."  I never did get to show her what I knew, because I never knew it anyway.

            John
          • Rob Lacy
            Sensei, I do agree that u tube will never take the place of a real Uke on the mat. Although I do believe They both have their place, Utube videos are fun to
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 15, 2015
              Sensei,

              I do agree that u tube will never take the place of a real Uke on the mat. Although I do believe They both have their place, Utube videos are fun to watch to see how others perform their techniques but they are to be taken with a grain of salt. Videos are just a reminder that there are many roads to the same destination. On the mat with your fellow students and Sensei you find your own way, you do learn more. You learn how your Sensei performs the technique although with how your fellow students do it and then you find out for yourself how to preform it. In short what I think is that yes mat time should always be your first option for training, along with self practice but when you are done training it is ok to watch a few videos to expand your knowledge. 

              Robert 

              Sent from my iPhone

              On Jan 13, 2015, at 5:35 PM, Shur-Way <shur-way@...> wrote:

              I was reading an article the other day in a martial arts mag. The article was about the new “at that time” 3D computer generated videos being presented on YouTube. I read the article because it seems that everyone has spent time with U-tube sensei. I have been noticing over the many years of being in a brick and mortar dojo that students spend their time viewing the multitude of video on the web to get their personal incites on all martial arts.

              I personally applaud everyone that is that interested in looking at all ways to fulfill the want of knowledge in the martial arts. I personally have found that reading about the ideas of martial arts is a fun way to stay connected when I am not on the mat.

              So this leads me to a conversation that I had the other night with some of my students at the end of class. Like I said earlier, I am for all students quenching their thirst for all that is martial art via books and video. Where I do draw the line is that all students need to understand that this kind of knowledge is not the same and never will be what you get in a brick and mortar dojo. To start with the one on one relationship that you get with the student and instructor can never be realized with U-tube sensei. The friendship of other students in and out of the dojo is not in a book.  The actual feeling of being the Uke in a technique can never be realized watching. The self confidence to know that you can truly perform the prescribed technique after the class is over.  None of these and plenty of other reason will not come from just reading books and watching videos.

              Something else I was mentioning and that is for every day that as a student does not train and substitute time on the mat for U-tube sensei or books can never be gotten back. So my message is; don’t give up one minute of real training in a brick and mortar dojo for U-tube sensei or books. You can never get back that time on the mat lost. ­­

              Swederska sensei

               

            • Andrew James Maminta
              Senpai Swederska, I whole-heartedly agree. I ve never understood the self help approach with utubepedia. Most especially when it comes to physical endeavors
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 15, 2015
                Senpai Swederska,

                I whole-heartedly agree.  I've never understood the self help approach with "utubepedia." Most especially when it comes to physical endeavors that require tactile-kinesthetics.

                From my perspective, I think there is little "knowledge" to be gained by simply watching videos.  Watching videos may open your eyes to other perspectives in martial ways but that's merely a heightened awareness, not an instance of "knowledge" gained. True martial knowledge can only come from physical attempts to recreate what you've seen, adaptation to your personal body type, and enough repetition to commit technique(s) to your muscle memory.

                I say if you want full perspective of other arts, cross-train with your primary art in full focus. That is, cross-train in such a way to enhance your primary art and not conflict with it.

                Osu,

                -Andrew aka Kwon

                Sent from my iPhone

                On Jan 15, 2015, at 9:06 AM, Rob Lacy reishi.robato@... [threeriversaikido] <threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                 

                Sensei,

                I do agree that u tube will never take the place of a real Uke on the mat. Although I do believe They both have their place, Utube videos are fun to watch to see how others perform their techniques but they are to be taken with a grain of salt. Videos are just a reminder that there are many roads to the same destination. On the mat with your fellow students and Sensei you find your own way, you do learn more. You learn how your Sensei performs the technique although with how your fellow students do it and then you find out for yourself how to preform it. In short what I think is that yes mat time should always be your first option for training, along with self practice but when you are done training it is ok to watch a few videos to expand your knowledge. 

                Robert 

                Sent from my iPhone

                On Jan 13, 2015, at 5:35 PM, Shur-Way <shur-way@...> wrote:

                I was reading an article the other day in a martial arts mag. The article was about the new “at that time” 3D computer generated videos being presented on YouTube. I read the article because it seems that everyone has spent time with U-tube sensei. I have been noticing over the many years of being in a brick and mortar dojo that students spend their time viewing the multitude of video on the web to get their personal incites on all martial arts.

                I personally applaud everyone that is that interested in looking at all ways to fulfill the want of knowledge in the martial arts. I personally have found that reading about the ideas of martial arts is a fun way to stay connected when I am not on the mat.

                So this leads me to a conversation that I had the other night with some of my students at the end of class. Like I said earlier, I am for all students quenching their thirst for all that is martial art via books and video. Where I do draw the line is that all students need to understand that this kind of knowledge is not the same and never will be what you get in a brick and mortar dojo. To start with the one on one relationship that you get with the student and instructor can never be realized with U-tube sensei. The friendship of other students in and out of the dojo is not in a book.  The actual feeling of being the Uke in a technique can never be realized watching. The self confidence to know that you can truly perform the prescribed technique after the class is over.  None of these and plenty of other reason will not come from just reading books and watching videos.

                Something else I was mentioning and that is for every day that as a student does not train and substitute time on the mat for U-tube sensei or books can never be gotten back. So my message is; don’t give up one minute of real training in a brick and mortar dojo for U-tube sensei or books. You can never get back that time on the mat lost. ­­

                Swederska sensei

                 

              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.