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Re: [TRA Yahoo Group] My 'Giant' Problem

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  • Elliot Freeman
    Try any of your solutions .....but just work on one of your ideas and see if your timing /position and success gets better! sensei
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 1, 2013
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      Try any of your solutions .....but just work on one of your ideas and see if your timing /position and success gets better!
      sensei
      On Feb 21, 2013, at 10:18 PM, akridge1997@... wrote:

       

      "My Giant Problem"

      I have a `giant' problem that I am seeking to solve. My first inclination is to get lower and the next is to attack the attack. What I am facing is an uke who is 7 foot tall (seemingly that tall when I get low, he gets a half foot taller). So when I want him to grab my wrist katate to lead into sumi otoshi, I receive a downward thrust on my wrist. His arm is unbendable as he stomps into stance.

      Of course, I have options to inflict pain since the forward knee is exposed as well as the groin and ribs. Looking back at the attack, I believe that I remained `on line' too long. Even though I initiated the connection, he was able to channel me down his line. Keep in mind there is a forceful grip from a larger person that I am trying to move.

      I was thinking an arimi step sooner would make him abandon his line. I tried entering early to catch him in an off-step, but I was still on his line. I did not try to back up which might have altered the target of his ki.

      Another thing I failed to do was thrust my arm as he targeted my wrist. Since he locked onto my wrist, I was unable to roll his hand back to his forearm to exert pain and take balance.

      Is this a question of one person's gedan vs another's chudan? Is one inherently stronger? Any thoughts on harmonizing 'Giants'?

      Kevin


    • conwayletitia
      Kevin, My 2 cents. To me, everyone is a giant. So, this is generally what I do when an uke gives me a very good grab that locks me down and not choosing to
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 5, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Kevin,

        My 2 cents.

        To me, everyone is a giant.

        So, this is generally what I do when an uke gives me a very good grab that locks me down and not choosing to move to another technique following the path of least resistance. I say "Excuse me, could we try that again...I'm not getting the technique right." Then repeat it slower with less strength involved so that you can actually feel where the paths of least resistance are. Once you have this, then speed up.

        Concerning sumi otoshi against a giant, you don't need necessarily to go lower. Rather, you want to move his center of gravity lower and "outside" the frame of his body. So, if he's grabbing your left wrist (katate tori), make a bigger sideways front foot "cheating" irimi step before the zig. Now zig quickly and more sideways. Quickly follow this first step with a "cheating" rear step before the zag and executing of the throw. This allows your arm to be extended several more inches than you normally do and be able to take the balance of a larger person for sumi otoshi. Obviously, this modification needs to be practiced a lot to make the timing work.

        Conway

        --- In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, "akridge1997@..." <akridge1997@...> wrote:
        >
        > Many here have said that a benefit to training with a beginning aikido student is the unconditioned responses to our motions. Let me say up front, we were speaking in general. I will say directly that I will train with you, Jourdan, any day of the week.
        >
        > There are students who get contrary, but as we have shared previously it is best to get several repetitions. The first attempt at a new technique, there will be faults in timing, balance, entry, stance, connection, control, etc. Being contrary should happen only after the movements are understood. Otherwise, nothing is learned and both partners have stood in place shaking their heads during the alotted time for the drill.
        >
        > By posing this 'giant' problem as a group discussion, I may have been perceived as lamenting my aikido. But by sharing, I wanted others to think of how they manage a similar disadvantage.
        >
        > I don't have the "Wha-Bam!!!", (lol, Sempai Mike and Sempai Dan), but I can maim and destroy. This is why I am training in Aikido so that I may use control as another option. Being grabbed by a giant falling timber who has advanced training in other arts posed a personal challenge of how to maneuver (control)the larger person whose axis, angles and reach differ from mine.
        >
        > I'm visualizing two tops spinning; one larger than the other. When they clash together the result is different than two of the same size.
        >
        > What I have gained from the discussion is the understanding of shikaku. Not that it means only for me to be behind the uke taking center, but to be hehind the movement. When my wrist was grabbed and locked down, it was in front. If I had jabbed my arm to get myself grabbed on the lower forearm, then my hand could have rotated behind the attacking wrist (in shikaku). This would have provided options to control instead of being controlled.
        >
        > I look forward to training tonight. I shoveled my driveway and sidewalks four times on Thursday so my ukenagashi should be strong along with my bum shoulder.
        >
        > Kevin
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, "dravendetta" <dravendetta@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I think that unless you are the "cankerous giant" often perceived to be a non compliant Uke, in this instance i had not been able to train in Aikido for 35+ days. I drove 43 miles to attend class to try to get back in the flow of the chosen art. I train in other arts..Everyday of the week. This is because I cannot come to class on that night. If i am doing a flow drill that i have not done in a long time or never done, and I am being grabbed for a technique, and Im not sure if I am supposed to resist, stand there, or break fall on the mat, I just do what seems to be the natural human response without striking or anything, being humble, and wait to see if am doing it wrong or right.al I think that if its brought to my attention during the drill, and let me try again, it might be beneficial. What may seem like resistance may actually be me standing there, however being a giant has downfalls.. If you have never had your head caught in a ceiling fan, asked no less than 100 times if I play basketball in one day, or genuine lines such as how is the weather up there, which usually results in a response I enjoy. Just because I hold Dan ranks in an art that may not seem to work, if used properly it can be destructive, the Krav Maga training is so barbaric it cant be practiced hardly, so i come to TRA. I trust that those higher ranked will understand the size, strength, and training i do, and help me develop my aikido. Just my two sense as the giant.....Sorry for any perceived arrogant stance and lack of cooperation.
        > >
        > > JOURDAN....IKAZUCHI UKEMI
        > >
        > > --- In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, Dan <danwoods.gm@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I'm still learning the Wha-Bam!!!
        > > >
        > > > Dan Woods
        > > >
        > > > On Feb 22, 2013, at 7:15 PM, Akridge <akridge1997@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > Thanks Sempai Mike,
        > > > >
        > > > > I agree the uke knows what is coming so only has to figure out what works best against the technique. There is also the potential that I make a mistake and get caught. So while I lost the opportunity to get repetitions during training, I did get a wake-up on the what-if I get locked down. The uke only got to stand and hold a wrist. I think 'shikaku in my movement' will help me flow and complete the technique or the one which next presents itself. I appreciate your insight. Kevin
        > > > >
        > > > > From: Shur-Way <shur-way@>
        > > > > To: threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com
        > > > > Sent: Fri, February 22, 2013 3:08:43 PM
        > > > > Subject: RE: [TRA Yahoo Group] Re: My 'Giant' Problem
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > From: threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com [mailto:threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of akridge1997@
        > > > > Sent: Friday, February 22, 2013 12:40 PM
        > > > > To: threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com
        > > > > Subject: [TRA Yahoo Group] Re: My 'Giant' Problem
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Thats part of the problem; no flow. Being locked at that fixed location it seems that I should get way low so that my elbow is below my wrist but then I have a 10 ft giant and I could get stomped. Basically don't stop the flow. I might have gotten lower to begin with and have my sword hand above my elbow.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Kevin,
        > > > >
        > > > > Getting low is to take balance. Your flow should never stop. Like water over a rock. If you hit a wall flow around it. You will never go thru it. Your energy should always be flowing in the direction of least resistance. Always stay ahead “shikaku” of your opponent keeping him off balance in body and mind. The opponent should always be trying to figure out what your next movement is going to be. Not you trying to figure out what their next movement will be. Remember that shikaku is everywhere in side your movement. Not just behind your opponent as always referred to in class. Fixing this will come from consistently training with a great instructor like Freeman Sensei. Picking up on your little incorrect movements is what class with a great instructor is all about.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > One thing to always remember about training. You are learning specific movements and your uke is only there for the ride. To question your skill up against an opponent of large size during a specific movement in class due to your uke being cankerous is wrong on your part. Don’t, your fine. If it continues to happen change partners. If you notice it continuing with other nage. Please let the instructor know. Really when this is happening it is a sign that your uke has not learned how to learn aikido yet. They are still in the stage of their personal training that they have to prove to themselves aikido works. They are not learning the movement or allowing you too. I would hope that in the real scheme of things you would move in many different ways to achieve your goal when you run into a larger person (rock) go with the flow and use all the tools in your tool box that you have learned in aikido. Not just dwell on a singular movement. Have “mushin”.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > For me, I feel that I am learning my martial art for many more reasons than I can count and if I want to train to fight I will, Train To Fight. That is a all together different attitude in my opinion. I mentioned on Tuesday night that we are learning to have a choice in the matter of a confrontation. To avoid, control, maim or destroy - Wha-Bam!!! This martial art gives me all of these choices. Leaving it up to me and not the art itself for that decision. I also mentioned that I will always have to live with my decision to destroy if that time should ever happen. REGRETS of destruction. That is for a time of reflection.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Since I am posting on a group forum and not to Kevin and Stephen along. All of the thoughts above and below do not reflect the opinions of anyone else. They are opinions of where I am at in my training. Please don’t take them personally or law.
        > > > >
        > > > > Mike Swederska
        > > > >
        > > > > BTW this is a great bunch of questions. Thanks Kevin for starting this conversation.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen" wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > If they bear down on you, let them fall. If they push in, let them in and take their balance. From there, sumi otoshi should be a pretty easy result to get from them.
        > > > >
        > > > > Stephen,
        > > > >
        > > > > One of the coolest things I have read. It says it all.
        > > > >
        > > > > Mike Swederska
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, "akridge1997@" wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > "My Giant Problem"
        > > > >
        > > > > I have a `giant' problem that I am seeking to solve. My first inclination is to get lower and the next is to attack the attack. What I am facing is an uke who is 7 foot tall (seemingly that tall when I get low, he gets a half foot taller Great! Make them bend over.). Getting low is to take balance thru attacking their center to lead into a technique. It should not be the technique all by itself even if they just fall down you still follow with a technique. Even if it is just running away. So when I want him to grab my wrist katate to lead into sumi otoshi, I receive a downward thrust on my wrist. His arm is unbendable as he stomps into stance. Use his unbendable arm any time as a lever in you favor or simply go around it.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Of course, I have options to inflict pain since the forward knee is exposed as well as the groin and ribs. I mentioned on Tuesday night that you are learning to have a choice in the matter of a confrontation. To avoid, control, maim or destroy. Looking back at the attack, I believe that I remained `on line' too long. Even though I initiated the connection, he was able to channel me down his line. Keep in mind there is a forceful grip from a larger person that I am trying to move. you hit a wall flow around it.
        > > > >
        > > > > I was thinking an arimi step sooner would make him abandon his line. Only if he has committed fully in your original position. I tried entering early to catch him in an off-step, but I was still on his line. As he turns to stay with you, remember that his center is turning with you. Thus you are not taking his center. I did not try to back up which might have altered the target of his ki.
        > > > >
        > > > > Another thing I failed to do was thrust my arm as he targeted my wrist. Since he locked onto my wrist, I was unable to roll his hand back to his forearm to exert pain and take balance. You are not working inside the attack location. Learning to deal with that first will get you to taking their balance thru the arm to shoulder. The movement that you are referring to is taught by Freeman sensei with the hand down as if you are holding a sword. Upon that connection you raise your sword in the grip of uke thus giving the connection to the shoulder. Too soon and you are down. Too late and your hand does nothing but thrust up above the shoulder and not thru the shoulder as intended Is this a question of one person's gedan vs another's chudan? Is one inherently stronger? . Not really.
        > > > > Any thoughts on harmonizing 'Giants'? Smith & Wesson to the alkalis heel……………..Wha-Bam!!!! ;>) Sorry just got carried away.
        > > > >
        > > > > Kevin
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (6)
        > > > > RECENT ACTIVITY: New Members 2
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Jourdan Von Braun
        That does make sense and gives the giant a second time to try a new technique. I respond as instinct however truthfully sometimes what may appear to be
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 5, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          That does make sense and gives the giant a second time to try a new technique. I respond as instinct however truthfully sometimes what may appear to be resistance is just me standing there... Maybe I train too much in other arts while stuck on call or am just a mom compliant uke, although I don't feel I am...It's difficult to know sometimes when your supposed to comply and take Ukemi or resist and go with what seems to be right...

                     Jourdan


          On Mar 5, 2013, at 3:55 PM, "conwayletitia" <conwayletitia@...> wrote:

           

          Kevin,

          My 2 cents.

          To me, everyone is a giant.

          So, this is generally what I do when an uke gives me a very good grab that locks me down and not choosing to move to another technique following the path of least resistance. I say "Excuse me, could we try that again...I'm not getting the technique right." Then repeat it slower with less strength involved so that you can actually feel where the paths of least resistance are. Once you have this, then speed up.

          Concerning sumi otoshi against a giant, you don't need necessarily to go lower. Rather, you want to move his center of gravity lower and "outside" the frame of his body. So, if he's grabbing your left wrist (katate tori), make a bigger sideways front foot "cheating" irimi step before the zig. Now zig quickly and more sideways. Quickly follow this first step with a "cheating" rear step before the zag and executing of the throw. This allows your arm to be extended several more inches than you normally do and be able to take the balance of a larger person for sumi otoshi. Obviously, this modification needs to be practiced a lot to make the timing work.

          Conway

          --- In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, "akridge1997@..." wrote:
          >
          > Many here have said that a benefit to training with a beginning aikido student is the unconditioned responses to our motions. Let me say up front, we were speaking in general. I will say directly that I will train with you, Jourdan, any day of the week.
          >
          > There are students who get contrary, but as we have shared previously it is best to get several repetitions. The first attempt at a new technique, there will be faults in timing, balance, entry, stance, connection, control, etc. Being contrary should happen only after the movements are understood. Otherwise, nothing is learned and both partners have stood in place shaking their heads during the alotted time for the drill.
          >
          > By posing this 'giant' problem as a group discussion, I may have been perceived as lamenting my aikido. But by sharing, I wanted others to think of how they manage a similar disadvantage.
          >
          > I don't have the "Wha-Bam!!!", (lol, Sempai Mike and Sempai Dan), but I can maim and destroy. This is why I am training in Aikido so that I may use control as another option. Being grabbed by a giant falling timber who has advanced training in other arts posed a personal challenge of how to maneuver (control)the larger person whose axis, angles and reach differ from mine.
          >
          > I'm visualizing two tops spinning; one larger than the other. When they clash together the result is different than two of the same size.
          >
          > What I have gained from the discussion is the understanding of shikaku. Not that it means only for me to be behind the uke taking center, but to be hehind the movement. When my wrist was grabbed and locked down, it was in front. If I had jabbed my arm to get myself grabbed on the lower forearm, then my hand could have rotated behind the attacking wrist (in shikaku). This would have provided options to control instead of being controlled.
          >
          > I look forward to training tonight. I shoveled my driveway and sidewalks four times on Thursday so my ukenagashi should be strong along with my bum shoulder.
          >
          > Kevin
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, "dravendetta" wrote:
          > >
          > > I think that unless you are the "cankerous giant" often perceived to be a non compliant Uke, in this instance i had not been able to train in Aikido for 35+ days. I drove 43 miles to attend class to try to get back in the flow of the chosen art. I train in other arts..Everyday of the week. This is because I cannot come to class on that night. If i am doing a flow drill that i have not done in a long time or never done, and I am being grabbed for a technique, and Im not sure if I am supposed to resist, stand there, or break fall on the mat, I just do what seems to be the natural human response without striking or anything, being humble, and wait to see if am doing it wrong or right.al I think that if its brought to my attention during the drill, and let me try again, it might be beneficial. What may seem like resistance may actually be me standing there, however being a giant has downfalls.. If you have never had your head caught in a ceiling fan, asked no less than 100 times if I play basketball in one day, or genuine lines such as how is the weather up there, which usually results in a response I enjoy. Just because I hold Dan ranks in an art that may not seem to work, if used properly it can be destructive, the Krav Maga training is so barbaric it cant be practiced hardly, so i come to TRA. I trust that those higher ranked will understand the size, strength, and training i do, and help me develop my aikido. Just my two sense as the giant.....Sorry for any perceived arrogant stance and lack of cooperation.
          > >
          > > JOURDAN....IKAZUCHI UKEMI
          > >
          > > --- In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, Dan wrote:
          > > >
          > > > I'm still learning the Wha-Bam!!!
          > > >
          > > > Dan Woods
          > > >
          > > > On Feb 22, 2013, at 7:15 PM, Akridge wrote:
          > > >
          > > > > Thanks Sempai Mike,
          > > > >
          > > > > I agree the uke knows what is coming so only has to figure out what works best against the technique. There is also the potential that I make a mistake and get caught. So while I lost the opportunity to get repetitions during training, I did get a wake-up on the what-if I get locked down. The uke only got to stand and hold a wrist. I think 'shikaku in my movement' will help me flow and complete the technique or the one which next presents itself. I appreciate your insight. Kevin
          > > > >
          > > > > From: Shur-Way
          > > > > To: threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com
          > > > > Sent: Fri, February 22, 2013 3:08:43 PM
          > > > > Subject: RE: [TRA Yahoo Group] Re: My 'Giant' Problem
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > From: threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com [mailto:threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of akridge1997@
          > > > > Sent: Friday, February 22, 2013 12:40 PM
          > > > > To: threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com
          > > > > Subject: [TRA Yahoo Group] Re: My 'Giant' Problem
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Thats part of the problem; no flow. Being locked at that fixed location it seems that I should get way low so that my elbow is below my wrist but then I have a 10 ft giant and I could get stomped. Basically don't stop the flow. I might have gotten lower to begin with and have my sword hand above my elbow.
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Kevin,
          > > > >
          > > > > Getting low is to take balance. Your flow should never stop. Like water over a rock. If you hit a wall flow around it. You will never go thru it. Your energy should always be flowing in the direction of least resistance. Always stay ahead “shikaku” of your opponent keeping him off balance in body and mind. The opponent should always be trying to figure out what your next movement is going to be. Not you trying to figure out what their next movement will be. Remember that shikaku is everywhere in side your movement. Not just behind your opponent as always referred to in class. Fixing this will come from consistently training with a great instructor like Freeman Sensei. Picking up on your little incorrect movements is what class with a great instructor is all about.
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > One thing to always remember about training. You are learning specific movements and your uke is only there for the ride. To question your skill up against an opponent of large size during a specific movement in class due to your uke being cankerous is wrong on your part. Don’t, your fine. If it continues to happen change partners. If you notice it continuing with other nage. Please let the instructor know. Really when this is happening it is a sign that your uke has not learned how to learn aikido yet. They are still in the stage of their personal training that they have to prove to themselves aikido works. They are not learning the movement or allowing you too. I would hope that in the real scheme of things you would move in many different ways to achieve your goal when you run into a larger person (rock) go with the flow and use all the tools in your tool box that you have learned in aikido. Not just dwell on a singular movement. Have “mushin”.
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > For me, I feel that I am learning my martial art for many more reasons than I can count and if I want to train to fight I will, Train To Fight. That is a all together different attitude in my opinion. I mentioned on Tuesday night that we are learning to have a choice in the matter of a confrontation. To avoid, control, maim or destroy - Wha-Bam!!! This martial art gives me all of these choices. Leaving it up to me and not the art itself for that decision. I also mentioned that I will always have to live with my decision to destroy if that time should ever happen. REGRETS of destruction. That is for a time of reflection.
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Since I am posting on a group forum and not to Kevin and Stephen along. All of the thoughts above and below do not reflect the opinions of anyone else. They are opinions of where I am at in my training. Please don’t take them personally or law.
          > > > >
          > > > > Mike Swederska
          > > > >
          > > > > BTW this is a great bunch of questions. Thanks Kevin for starting this conversation.
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen" wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > If they bear down on you, let them fall. If they push in, let them in and take their balance. From there, sumi otoshi should be a pretty easy result to get from them.
          > > > >
          > > > > Stephen,
          > > > >
          > > > > One of the coolest things I have read. It says it all.
          > > > >
          > > > > Mike Swederska
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, "akridge1997@" wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > "My Giant Problem"
          > > > >
          > > > > I have a `giant' problem that I am seeking to solve. My first inclination is to get lower and the next is to attack the attack. What I am facing is an uke who is 7 foot tall (seemingly that tall when I get low, he gets a half foot taller Great! Make them bend over.). Getting low is to take balance thru attacking their center to lead into a technique. It should not be the technique all by itself even if they just fall down you still follow with a technique. Even if it is just running away. So when I want him to grab my wrist katate to lead into sumi otoshi, I receive a downward thrust on my wrist. His arm is unbendable as he stomps into stance. Use his unbendable arm any time as a lever in you favor or simply go around it.
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Of course, I have options to inflict pain since the forward knee is exposed as well as the groin and ribs. I mentioned on Tuesday night that you are learning to have a choice in the matter of a confrontation. To avoid, control, maim or destroy. Looking back at the attack, I believe that I remained `on line' too long. Even though I initiated the connection, he was able to channel me down his line. Keep in mind there is a forceful grip from a larger person that I am trying to move. you hit a wall flow around it.
          > > > >
          > > > > I was thinking an arimi step sooner would make him abandon his line. Only if he has committed fully in your original position. I tried entering early to catch him in an off-step, but I was still on his line. As he turns to stay with you, remember that his center is turning with you. Thus you are not taking his center. I did not try to back up which might have altered the target of his ki.
          > > > >
          > > > > Another thing I failed to do was thrust my arm as he targeted my wrist. Since he locked onto my wrist, I was unable to roll his hand back to his forearm to exert pain and take balance. You are not working inside the attack location. Learning to deal with that first will get you to taking their balance thru the arm to shoulder. The movement that you are referring to is taught by Freeman sensei with the hand down as if you are holding a sword. Upon that connection you raise your sword in the grip of uke thus giving the connection to the shoulder. Too soon and you are down. Too late and your hand does nothing but thrust up above the shoulder and not thru the shoulder as intended Is this a question of one person's gedan vs another's chudan? Is one inherently stronger? . Not really.
          > > > > Any thoughts on harmonizing 'Giants'? Smith & Wesson to the alkalis heel……………..Wha-Bam!!!! ;>) Sorry just got carried away.
          > > > >
          > > > > Kevin
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (6)
          > > > > RE

        • akridge1997@att.net
          Thanks Sensei, more reps! AIKIDO is learned through rigorous repetition of Aikido techniques--the body will teach the mind - O Sensei (Great Teacher).
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 6, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks Sensei, more reps!

            "AIKIDO is learned through rigorous repetition of Aikido techniques--the body will teach the mind" - O'Sensei (Great Teacher).

            --- In threeriversaikido@yahoogroups.com, Elliot Freeman <freesensei@...> wrote:
            >
            > Try any of your solutions .....but just work on one of your ideas and see if your timing /position and success gets better!
            > sensei
            > On Feb 21, 2013, at 10:18 PM, akridge1997@... wrote:
            >
            > > "My Giant Problem"
            > >
            > > I have a `giant' problem that I am seeking to solve. My first inclination is to get lower and the next is to attack the attack. What I am facing is an uke who is 7 foot tall (seemingly that tall when I get low, he gets a half foot taller). So when I want him to grab my wrist katate to lead into sumi otoshi, I receive a downward thrust on my wrist. His arm is unbendable as he stomps into stance.
            > >
            > > Of course, I have options to inflict pain since the forward knee is exposed as well as the groin and ribs. Looking back at the attack, I believe that I remained `on line' too long. Even though I initiated the connection, he was able to channel me down his line. Keep in mind there is a forceful grip from a larger person that I am trying to move.
            > >
            > > I was thinking an arimi step sooner would make him abandon his line. I tried entering early to catch him in an off-step, but I was still on his line. I did not try to back up which might have altered the target of his ki.
            > >
            > > Another thing I failed to do was thrust my arm as he targeted my wrist. Since he locked onto my wrist, I was unable to roll his hand back to his forearm to exert pain and take balance.
            > >
            > > Is this a question of one person's gedan vs another's chudan? Is one inherently stronger? Any thoughts on harmonizing 'Giants'?
            > >
            > > Kevin
            > >
            > >
            >
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