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Aquinas, thomism and the human person

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  • jamesmiguez
    Dear Everyone, One of the most fascinating topics of discussion in the intellectual arena today is the status of of the human person; what is his or her
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 16, 2009
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      Dear Everyone,

      One of the most fascinating topics of discussion in the intellectual
      arena today is the status of of the human person; what is his or her
      freedom, rights and responsibilities?

      Aquinas does specifically address the issue of human person, although
      not in a thorough manner; more frequently he addresses the issue of
      person from a more abstract position, that of Boethius, which was
      common in the era.

      However today, especially in the Catholic Church, theology, etc, and
      in conjunction with a widespread affirmation of many people across the
      globe in regard to human rights and the dignity of the human person in
      the face of totalitarian tyranny, there is an intense focus upon the
      very reality of the human person and its place in creation and
      salvation history. What then is the human person? Or more accurately,
      who is the human person? And how does this reality, without par in
      the universe of creation, fit in the thomist theological and
      philosophical synthesis?

      These are the questions I hope to address in the main.

      Sincerely,

      James Miguez
    • pamela werrbach
      A wonderful idea!  I know little about this, but have learned most from the famous French Thomist philosopher Jacques Maritain.  What do you all think of his
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 18, 2009
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        A wonderful idea!  I know little about this, but have learned most from the famous French Thomist philosopher Jacques Maritain.  What do you all think of his work?---P. Proietti

        --- On Fri, 1/16/09, jamesmiguez <jamesmiguez@...> wrote:
        From: jamesmiguez <jamesmiguez@...>
        Subject: [thomism] Aquinas, thomism and the human person
        To: thomism@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, January 16, 2009, 8:00 AM

        Dear Everyone,

        One of the most fascinating topics of discussion in the intellectual
        arena today is the status of of the human person; what is his or her
        freedom, rights and responsibilities?

        Aquinas does specifically address the issue of human person, although
        not in a thorough manner; more frequently he addresses the issue of
        person from a more abstract position, that of Boethius, which was
        common in the era.

        However today, especially in the Catholic Church, theology, etc, and
        in conjunction with a widespread affirmation of many people across the
        globe in regard to human rights and the dignity of the human person in
        the face of totalitarian tyranny, there is an intense focus upon the
        very reality of the human person and its place in creation and
        salvation history. What then is the human person? Or more accurately,
        who is the human person? And how does this reality, without par in
        the universe of creation, fit in the thomist theological and
        philosophical synthesis?

        These are the questions I hope to address in the main.

        Sincerely,

        James Miguez


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      • jamesmiguez
        ... from the famous French Thomist philosopher Jacques Maritain. What do you all think of his work?---P. Proietti Maritain was a great thomist philosopher and
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 18, 2009
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          --- In thomism@yahoogroups.com, pamela werrbach <pwproietti@...> wrote:
          >
          > A wonderful idea!  I know little about this, but have learned most from the famous French Thomist philosopher Jacques Maritain.  What do you all think of his work?---P. Proietti

          Maritain was a great thomist philosopher and I have read him often.  Maritain well understood the dignity of the human person and his rights vis a vis political institutions.  This French thomist also understood the importance of the degrees of knowledge, intuition of being, contemplation, etc.  He was influenced greatly by John of St. Thomas and his philosophy of transitive sign in relation to concept.  He was also holy, and colaborated with Garrigou-Lagrange on the necessity of supernatural contemplation for salvation, and as the normal course of the spiritual life.  His understanding of being and analogy, I find apropos.

          But I will discuss thomism and the human person from both a theological and philosophical perspective, and this does not rule out Maritain.

          I hope this helps,

          James
           

          >
          > --- On Fri, 1/16/09, jamesmiguez jamesmiguez@... wrote:
          > From: jamesmiguez jamesmiguez@...
          > Subject: [thomism] Aquinas, thomism and the human person
          > To: thomism@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Friday, January 16, 2009, 8:00 AM
          >
          > Dear Everyone,
          >
          > One of the most fascinating topics of discussion in the intellectual
          > arena today is the status of of the human person; what is his or her
          > freedom, rights and responsibilities?
          >
          > Aquinas does specifically address the issue of human person, although
          > not in a thorough manner; more frequently he addresses the issue of
          > person from a more abstract position, that of Boethius, which was
          > common in the era.
          >
          > However today, especially in the Catholic Church, theology, etc, and
          > in conjunction with a widespread affirmation of many people across the
          > globe in regard to human rights and the dignity of the human person in
          > the face of totalitarian tyranny, there is an intense focus upon the
          > very reality of the human person and its place in creation and
          > salvation history. What then is the human person? Or more accurately,
          > who is the human person? And how does this reality, without par in
          > the universe of creation, fit in the thomist theological and
          > philosophical synthesis?
          >
          > These are the questions I hope to address in the main.
          >
          > Sincerely,
          >
          > James Miguez
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
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