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RE: [thewire] interesting article on 7" singles/good ban

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  • Hille, Per-Christian
    ... Yeah, the lab singles are always fun; these days they constitute almost 50% av my total 7 purchases. Knowing they ll have doubled in value 2 weeks after
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 28, 2000
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      > ...It's great fun coming home after a
      > Stereolab concert, throwing the colored tour vinyl on the turntable
      > and admiring the sleeve artwork while you listen to something
      > brand new that wouldn't have fit comfortably in context of an Lp.
      > Long live 7" singles
      >
      Yeah, the lab singles are always fun; these days they constitute almost 50%
      av my total 7" purchases. Knowing they'll have doubled in value 2 weeks
      after buying them is an added bonus. Not that I'd even consider selling
      them; it's just fun to know there are people out there who would glady part
      with a weeks (months?) wages for my pink vinyl "John Cage Bubblegum"
      including a stick of bubblegum. (But how to keep it from crumbling to
      pieces...?)
      But tour-singles: a valid entry to an artists discography, or a throwaway
      novelty item? Would they really "waste" their best stuff on a few 100
      devotees?
      Per-Christian
    • kevin king
      ... Yes! Though not in the same quantity as other media. Besides certain releases with exclusive tracks, the packaging itself is what often lures me.
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 28, 2000
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        > Is anyone still
        > buying 7"'s?

        Yes! Though not in the same quantity as other media. Besides
        certain releases with exclusive tracks, the packaging itself is what
        often lures me. Something that us vinyl lovers appreciate is the
        'object,' the thing that presents itself to be looked at and fondled
        while the music plays and which will disappear with the advent of
        mp3's (I like all media, but it's a shame that this part of the
        listening experience is soon to be lost). I buy the obvious
        collectibles from Stereolab and related (pram, lithops, broadcast),
        but also find an occasional vintage gem (proud owner of all three
        versions of The Man With The Golden Arm ep with the severe
        modern Saul Bass cover) ...It's great fun coming home after a
        Stereolab concert, throwing the colored tour vinyl on the turntable
        and admiring the sleeve artwork while you listen to something
        brand new that wouldn't have fit comfortably in context of an Lp.
        Long live 7" singles!

        ...coincidentally (I swear) listening to Sun Ra's "Singles"
      • kevin king
        ... Valid entry I d say (in particular with Stereolab, many do consider the singles to be their best material - though I don t agree with this). I d guess
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 28, 2000
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          > But tour-singles: a valid entry to an artists
          > discography, or a throwaway novelty item? Would they really "waste"
          > their best stuff on a few 100 devotees?

          Valid entry I'd say (in particular with Stereolab, many do consider
          the singles to be their best material - though I don't agree with
          this). I'd guess they do the singles for the love of it, and as another
          creative outlet. They're confessed vinyl fetishists themselves of
          course. The quantity pressed has increased over the years as
          they've realised fans can't have enough, and you can't say they're
          not generous as they regularly put out those compilations of
          rarities. It's a different medium. And with a prolific group like the
          lab, it's no surprise that after producing one of their meticulously
          constructed Lp's there's plenty of other material done out of context
          waiting to be recorded. Doesn't make it any less valid.
        • manny@telerama.com
          true there are much less 7 s coming out of standard indie rock, but you are fooling yourself (or not very informed) if you believe that the 7 is dead. in the
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 28, 2000
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            true there are much less 7's coming out of standard indie rock, but you
            are fooling yourself (or not very informed) if you believe that the 7"
            is dead. in the screamo/emo/crust/grind/core world, 7"s are still being
            issued and sold in large numbers, and in the experimental scene there are
            still a fair number of 7"s coming out, which i can see on sale in
            RRR & Anomalous catalogs etc (unfortunately some other experimental
            catalogs refuse to bother carrying 7"s anymore). what *is* unfair is
            the prices some of the experimental 7"s are going for - like that
            Brainwashed label which sells 7"s for $8 each, even though they are
            pressed in about the same quantity as any punk 7" which would still go
            for $3-$4. there's no excuse for that.
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