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Short Tracks

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  • Chris Sharp
    All this talk of tiny tracks and not yet a mention for the pioneers of British Grindcore ! Nostalgics like me will fondly recall the 1987 / 1988 era when the
    Message 1 of 2 , May 2, 2000
      All this talk of tiny tracks and not yet a mention for the pioneers of British Grindcore !

      Nostalgics like me will fondly recall the 1987 / 1988 era when the prime movers in this frequently hilarious micro-scene seemed to be having some kind of hell-bent ultra-brevity contest.

      It all kicked off with "Scum" by Napalm Death, which had about 40 tracks on it. Other records, like "Reek Of Putrefaction" by Carcass and "The Only Good Punk Is A Dead One" by Electro-Hippies then joined the fray with very short songs about decaying body parts and flared trousers respectively.

      But the peaks of acheivement were (I think) a track by Napalm Death called "Mega Armageddon Death" which was released as a 7" by Earache and which clocked in at 0:01; and an album by Sore Throat, the title of which I'm afraid escapes me, which had no fewer than 100 tracks on one side. To make up for it, side two featured just one 20 minute-long magnum opus. It was, of course, bloody awful.

      Chris
    • David Doughman
      Worth checking out: Curd Duca s recent release Elevator 3 on Mille Plateaux. Below is a decent summation of its content on behalf of the good folks at Other
      Message 2 of 2 , May 4, 2000
        Worth checking out: Curd Duca's recent release Elevator 3 on Mille
        Plateaux.

        Below is a decent summation of its content on behalf of the good folks at
        Other Music (www.othermusic.com) in NYC:

        CURD DUCA "Elevator 3" (Mille Plateaux, Germany) CD/LP $14.99/$11.99
        RealAudio: http://userweb.interactive.net/~tomc/curdduca.ram
        RealAudio: http://userweb.interactive.net/~tomc/curduca.ram
        Duca's work has long been the most coherent and structured of any
        electronic artist on Mille Plateaux (yet); "Elevator 3" is no exception.
        And this is probably due to the origins of his music--rather than generate
        them from scratch or strip them down to near-nothingness, he tries to
        retain the sonic qualities of the samples he uses, even as he fragments
        them exaggeratedly. Decontextualized and de-textured, the he takes
        formerly
        lush muzak sounds down to a dull chill. As he grays music which formerly
        had vibrant color, he's purposefully softening and muffling the impact.
        This album does this even more than the two previous "Elevator"
        collections
        of miniatures (there are 48 tracks in 38 minutes here), and adds a
        vocalist, the wraithlike, vaporous Carin Feldschmidt. Like a journey
        through Times Square, blindfolded. [RE]
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