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A Cynic Speaks! (was)Re: [thewire] Re: Bebop and minimalism

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  • John Everall
    ... Such labels appear to be useful in a limited way. The primary motivation for utilization of such labels appears closely linked to marketing strategy.
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 26, 1999
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      Rhys Chatham wrote:
      >
      > From: Rhys Chatham <Rhys.Chatham@...>

      > I think these labelling terms are important, because believe it or not,
      > they actually mean something to the people who really know the music! For
      > example, I'm sorry, but jungle is not the same as drum n bass.

      Such labels appear to be useful in a limited way. The primary motivation for utilization of
      such labels appears closely linked to marketing strategy. Although not always the case with
      artists, this certainly seems to be true with regard to a large number of record companies.
      These designations of genre are perhaps useful as indicators of content, but the ossification
      of genre conventions can obviously limit artistic development. "Thou Shalt Not" is etched in
      stone in certain cases, and this can be hugely problematic.
      I might be getting a little cynical, but I am inclined to agree with Lionel Snell that the
      development of *taste* in numerous cases is premised on what is currently fashionable. For
      instance, I adore Thomas Koner's earlier works, but feel that he bakes exceedingly bad techno.
      The cynic in me ("a cynic is a man who when he smells flowers looks around for a coffin" -
      Bierce) can't help but suspect that the limited sales potential of Koner's early works was at
      least tangentially related to the formation of Porter Ricks. I feel this is true in a number of
      cases, and with certain artists - who shall remain nameless, as I am feeling charitable today -
      I know this is true. Genre-hopping with the implicit aim of maximising sales is an indisputable
      fact of the current music *scene*.

      regards,

      John Everall.

      (Sentrax site: http://www.ndirect.co.uk/~john.sentrax/ )
    • Mark Coyle
      Hi ... It may not be now but back in 1991-to late 1992 when it was being created bit by bit no such distinction was made. Then DnB became the dub of the
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 27, 1999
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        Hi

        >> they actually mean something to the people who really know the music! For
        >> example, I'm sorry, but jungle is not the same as drum n bass.


        It may not be now but back in 1991-to late 1992 when it was being created
        bit by bit no such distinction was made. Then DnB became the dub of the
        Jungle scene. Jungle iteself mutated away from the ragga samples and so it
        went on. It was an exciting time because back then everybody hated it.
        Only a hardcore of hip-hop / house / techno / reggae kids getting together
        made it happen. However back then we could not get gigs, PAs or anything.
        We were seen as kind of outlaws. Even back then when it was just starting,
        in Nottingham we were working up at 145-160 BPM. Many people I knew turned
        their backs in disgust when about 1993 things started to turn. Goldie's
        "Terminator" got coverage beyond the usual and the house crowd started
        appearing. All of a sudden it was as though all the people involved were
        cast out and a new breed moved in. Of course they soon moved on to other
        things, happy hardcore, hardbag and so on. Caused a bitter taste at the
        time though. Anyway, it's all history now. It just made me reflect. The
        true heroes of the time were people like Dj SS and D'Cruze, Q-Bass, Darkman
        and others who released bone crushingly hard records for the time, very "out
        there" and I think even now many records of today don't approach the raw
        visceral limitless energy of those early records.

        cheers
        Mark
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